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Singing Above Natural Limits

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Hey all, there are many of you on the forum who have insane ranges... well above 3 octaves. I firmly believe that even if you have 1 octave and use it well you can still be a good singer.

Throughout history we hear many teachers say to sing as nature intend. "If you are a tenor then sing like a tenor. If you are a bass sing like a bass." There are also rare cases of people who were able to surpass their limits through years of training (ie: baritone singing tenor).

Personally I don't care what vocal fach I am I just want to sing and let my voice be free. That means singing through the passaggio area.... however when this happens I feel like I am literally mixing various vocal faches. My speaking voice is somewhere in the baritone range but can freely sing some bass notes and my singing voice has always been like a tenor. I could never do all 3 together until I started working on bridging & connecting and now I feel like I can sing like a bass+baritone+tenor combined.

Is this normal? Is it really possible to have a completely flexible & usable vocal range without destroying your voice? Are sirens the best way to get that flexibility? Should I stick to my natural singing range or treat my entire voice as one unit?

By the way... this whole "feeling" started when I started working more on head voice and started viewing my voice as a very "small" thing.... I used to feel like my low notes were big and open and placed in my chest and high notes were small and up high... now it feels like everything is focused and in the mask... like a laser beam. Even if the note is 3 octaves apart I can still feel the resonance more forward than I did before. Playing with larynx dampening & twang has also helped make the sound more genuine.

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Well, I'm probably not much of a help on this one. I only have 3 octaves. So, not the largest range. But at least I have the range to occupy one fach. My problem usually arises from trying to sing below my natural limit and failing horribly, at least according to one.

However, Jay, I think it would be great to hear a sound sample of what you are doing. I don't feel the need to offer one of mine because there is already a cornucopia, yea, even a surfeit of my singing here, over the past 2.5 years.

So, when you talk about being able to sing some bass, some baritone, some tenor, it would be neat to hear that.

As far as natural limits, well that begs some definition. There is dynamic range, the range of noises your body could possibly make, from lowest to highest. Then there is the artistic range, the area where you have the greatest control of volume, tone, expression. I concern myself only with my artistic range, which happens to match my dynamic range. The highest note I have reached is a C6, and that's full voice, at least full voice such as I have. My lowest arstistic note is C3. I can go 1, sometimes 1 steps below that but it is greatly reduced in volume and I have no control over it and haven't really bothered to get better "ring" in an area where I don't really have a ring or ping. So, I live within the confines of my 3 octaves, fortunately of which encompass most songs I want to sing.

Just a suggestion from another amateur, stick with the mask thingy. It will do good things for you, regardless of what range you are singing. Though I have read that the lowest notes, especially if you are after bass extension is to limit resonance to the mouth and use a lowered larynx or covered sound.

I just don't have those low notes. It has been more worth my time to smooth out passagio (even light tenors have passagio) and make my paltry 3 octaves work seemlessly than to worry about extremes of range. That's why I prefaced this with me probably not being the best one to answer your question. However, there are baritones here who can also sing quite a bit of my range. Such as Benny. That dude has an unreal range. And he's just beginning with 4 Pillars, though I think he had some training, before.

Hey Benny, you want to give this a shot?

Happy New Year from Ron, the tall texan with a limited singing range.

:D

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And one more thing, I do agree with the 1 good octave, if that is all that you have. Make that one octave work. There's a new thread about the song "Hurt" as covered by Johnny Cash. His singing on that song is within one octave, about an octave below Reznor's original. But it is the definitive version. Because the song is believable. Cash sang the song like it was autobiographical, as if he wrote it. Johnny Cash is a singer. Not because of technique or range. But because he feels the song. It's that artistic "it" that is not definable so much as it can be felt.

Long live the Man in Black.

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you where never intended to sing or speak by nature, singing and speaking is something we learned. Nature never intended baritones or tenors... The main function of the vocalfolds is protecting the windpipe from food

Hence many people can sing very very low and very very high if trained...

Teachers who say sing like nature intended and such stuff dont have a clue and are probably teachers from the dinosaur age... These claims is also usually just an excuse for not being able to teach you what you want.

But sure we have natural sounds called primalsounds they can aid you in your singing but to sing with only primalsounds wont work.

I felt/feel like you my voice behaves much the same as yours, now when technique starts to get good i choose how i want to sound.

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Jens, you keep saying that recently. So, maybe you can answer the question no one else will answer no matter how many times I have asked it. Why does Steve Perry not sing bass?

tick, tock, tick, tock .....

finger tap, finger tap .....

ahem (throat clearing )....

(crickets chirping)

(snores, (I fell asleep waiting))

:)

I'd also ask why Steven Tyler does not sing bass or even speak in bass. But I have only so much time left on this Earth.

:D

I know, bad ron, bad ron ...

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you where never intended to sing or speak by nature, singing and speaking is something we learned. Nature never intended baritones or tenors... The main function of the vocalfolds is protecting the windpipe from food

Hence many people can sing very very low and very very high if trained...

Teachers who say sing like nature intended and such stuff dont have a clue and are probably teachers from the dinosaur age... These claims is also usually just an excuse for not being able to teach you what you want.

But sure we have natural sounds called primalsounds they can aid you in your singing but to sing with only primalsounds wont work.

I felt/feel like you my voice behaves much the same as yours, now when technique starts to get good i choose how i want to sound.

@Jens: I disagree completely... Common sense would dictate you are incorrect on all your points you just made without having to look deep into it....

Nature did intend for the human race to have speach and communitive abilities... Animals grunt, bark, roar, whatever, because they are not equiped (for a lack of proper medical terms) a VoiceBox..

We have this... Why?? If we are only 'intended' to grunt and use it as a means to not choke, do we have this, and they do not? So... do some scientific research before you make a statement of no merit...

Second point you made is how we were never meant to be a baritone or tenor, and whatnot..

Again.. I disagree.. that falls throughout all of nature... a cow does not sound like a pig, and a bear doesn't sound like a monkey....

So, yeah.. fold size, shape, flexability, placement, augmentation, development does dictate if you are going to be a bass, baritone or tenor..

Go ahead and sing a sample of you doing a Barry White song with the same colour and smoothness as him -- should be easy since you've claimed we have a choice...

Take as long as you want to practice..

I'll love to hear your version - which should be exactly like his (not same voice, but same "ease" at reaching his b1 notes for long, sustained implementation of words..

btw: you stated "many" people can sing veryveryvery low / high... Shouldn't you mean ALL PEOPLE can??

Anyway, not hear to fight with ya.. just wanted to point out that I think you need to educate yourself a bit more on points you claim to be factual before actually typing them in a forum that could potientially discourage new talent merging..

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^ hey guys thanks for replying, don't mean to start a war on vocal fach or anything. It is a FACT that ALL people can sing very high or low WITH training... just look across youtube there are hundreds of people with insane ranges. My question was specific towards that "USABLE" range we all are striving for.

A clear example is in pillars... when Lunte sings the exact same notes as me it seems much more powerful and boomy whereas my voice sounds brighter and more "tenory" unless I dampen the larynx. Can I sing low notes? YES but the color of my voice would be much different than that of a true bass.

@David thanks for your post as well but you are severely underestimating the human voice. I agree that we are all meant to sound a certain way. Even if I sing a low note I still sound like ME. But how do you explain transgenders who "change" their natural voice to the EXTENT that they can fool people into thinking they are the opposite gender. :lol: Is the voice really that flexible? Why on earth do we have a falsetto if it wasn't required by "nature" or why do we have the false folds to growl with.

Is it safe for people to sing outside what "nature intended?" I'm not sure but there's only one way to find out. :cool:

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@JayMC : I honestly don't think I am.. and this is why:

The transgender aspect of ones voice after manipulation of the vocals does change the chord signature , however, you will not get (as used prior) a Barry white sounding man, sounding like a female, because there is only so much you can do.. A male with a high voice (tenor) can pull it off because the placement will be there already - though in most cases, will be a "lower" female voice.. Of course there are exceptions to this, but there would be more transgenders that have a contrived voice and will sound off -- may sound female'ish, but off...

Indeed, it is true that we can all reach very high, or very low, that wasn't what I was referring to.. A baritone can sing in the tenor range, but it will never sound as bright and timbre as a true tenor.. The vocals are just placed higher for tens and lower for baritones..

We have the False folds as you mentioned, because after all we still are animals.. I didn't say we lacked what the they (animals) had, I said we have a voicebox which they do not..

Falsetto is a disconnection of the vocals Jay... it is when the chords are not completely together which allows air to flow through... Remember, the vocal folds are moving parts.. they spread apart and come together....

So, in short, you can grow your voice to sing high, or low... and you can make it sound awesome... but if you are in a different class you will never sound as natural as one that is... Barry white can sing whistle, but he can never pull off a Led Zeppelin or Sabastian Bach song in their key...

But we are also forgetting one important factor here.... Designation is not how HIGH you can sing.. it is how LOW you can sing... A Tenor can only "thicken" their vocals so much for example.

So which ever way you want to accept, is fine... I'm just stating the obvious (to me), or there would be more of it in the professional field - Michael Jackson, would have song Godsmack songs and Johnny Cash would have sung Bruno Marx material... SImply - they can not.. even in their own voice, they would have added it in for dynamics and emotion...

So, yeah, what ever your normal talking type of range is, combined with your lowest note you can reach, will determine your class (B,B,T)..

I know you mentioned that chest voice was booming and head was light, but now it seems to be all together... That's my point about this..

Tenors, when they sing a note that you are in head voice for - they are in chest voice.. Same if a bass sings a note in head voice, that note could be in a baritones Chest voice..

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@Jens: I disagree completely... Common sense would dictate you are incorrect on all your points you just made without having to look deep into it....

Nature did intend for the human race to have speach and communitive abilities... Animals grunt, bark, roar, whatever, because they are not equiped (for a lack of proper medical terms) a VoiceBox..

We have this... Why?? If we are only 'intended' to grunt and use it as a means to not choke, do we have this, and they do not? So... do some scientific research before you make a statement of no merit...

Second point you made is how we were never meant to be a baritone or tenor, and whatnot..

Again.. I disagree.. that falls throughout all of nature... a cow does not sound like a pig, and a bear doesn't sound like a monkey....

So, yeah.. fold size, shape, flexability, placement, augmentation, development does dictate if you are going to be a bass, baritone or tenor..

Go ahead and sing a sample of you doing a Barry White song with the same colour and smoothness as him -- should be easy since you've claimed we have a choice...

Take as long as you want to practice..

I'll love to hear your version - which should be exactly like his (not same voice, but same "ease" at reaching his b1 notes for long, sustained implementation of words..

btw: you stated "many" people can sing veryveryvery low / high... Shouldn't you mean ALL PEOPLE can??

Anyway, not hear to fight with ya.. just wanted to point out that I think you need to educate yourself a bit more on points you claim to be factual before actually typing them in a forum that could potientially discourage new talent merging..

Ok read this and really think this through cause it makes sense, and is also a big factor in how vocaltechnqiues actualy do work aswell as they do.

If nature intended something with our voice there would be only so much to learn, but it doesnt quite work this way :)

the human voice is perfectly able to mimic all animals including pigs,chickens,horses to name a few. I can do this personaly and yet im not a horse or pig...

However i think it's extremly funny you wanna make the similarity between fach and diffrent species of animals

a horse does not sound like a chicken(dooh) But a human sounds like a human... the diffrence between baritone and tenor is NOT comperable to the diffrence between a chicken and a horse...

Fachs are only for classical purposes, so yes a tenor can sound like a baritone and a baritone can sound like a tenor there are a million examples of this. Many classical singers started out as basses and bartiones then ended up as tenors Period... How come? isnt that impossible? Did the glorious cow turn into a chicken? ;)

Nature didnt intend speech it's something that we learned as our brains grew bigger, connecting enviromental things through sound. There's a theory that human speech evolved from the sounds we made whilst eating by the fires in the early days.

Isolate a child, dont teach him to speak and all you have is a child with primalsounds like the animals. Animals also have a voicebox. heck parrots can mimic italians last time i checked... where did you get that info from?:P

Im NOT stating there is no physical factor, but im stating that it's exxtremly low... Enviroment(how you grew up,your parents,people youve mimiced, personality) shapes the voice more than your physicality

Nor am I stating all people will have big range hence the "many" instead of all

Very few actualy has the personality to bust their ass and get to where they want to be...

No i cant do a perfect barry white right of the bat, First I havent trained for those sounds and im not that much into basso sounds. Hence my bass end is not good :) Do i belive i would be able to nail Barry White? No i dont think so. Im to far from him in to many ways...

Practice makes perfect, when you realise your voice is learnt(how you speak your timbre, dialect language ect ect) you start to realise the potential you have to work with...

for instance how would your voice be if you where italian? you would probably use loads of diffrent sounds than the one's you are using today, your speakingvoice wouldnt sound the same. Heck imagine we changed your personality and made you extremly Shy, your speakingvoice wouldnt be the same(probably you would have big problems with singing loudly)

and those are only two enviromental factors...

Edit: Ronws because then Barry White would be out of his job...

Cheers mates :cool:

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Indeed, it is true that we can all reach very high, or very low, that wasn't what I was referring to.. A baritone can sing in the tenor range, but it will never sound as bright and timbre as a true tenor.. The vocals are just placed higher for tens and lower for baritones..

I have to politely disagree. Check out the great Italian singer Carlo Bergonzi who started his operatic career as a Baritone, and then later re-trained as a tenor. When he became a Tenor he sounded like a "true" tenor. There are others who've switched too, including switching from Tenor to Baritone.

There seem to two camps here on the forum:

1) those who believe everyone has a "natural range" that they should learn and become proficient at, and

2) those who think you can shape your voice / range the way you want.

I'm in the second camp. I've done it myself. It's not easy and it takes a lot of work. However, I don't think it's bad if people don't expand their voices. Everyone has their own goals and I totally respect that. An expanded range doesn't make a good singer / musician. At the end of the day I have to agree with Jens. When it comes to singing - the sky is the limit.

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DOn't know who he is.. so can't comment on Carlo.. however, he may be an exception (as I originally stated there are)... However, I still truly believe that if you have a baritone that trains to be a tenor and hit a c7 note.. and a true tenor to hit a c7 note.. the tenor will sound fuller and more natural doing it...

I've noticed a lot of bari's that do high tenor , have a more covered sound then a pure tenor..

I agree in #2 as well. that's not what I'm saying.. just pointing out that there are limitations that we experience, or every person could sing from c1 to c8, have perfect tone and pitch, and cover every song created with perfect execution (even in their own voices).. but you can train all your life, there is a point.

A baritone may be able to hit the high C in a tenor range... however, they don't sound good singing at that tone, but they can reach it.... A tenor can reach it, and sing at it sounding good.... why??

Because the placement is different...

It like asking Metallica to sing Bruno Marx songs in Bruno's key, or bruno to sing metallica in their key...

They can practice all the want, and hit all the notes, but they will sound like crap... because it is not their natural range..

anyway.. subject on my end is getting dry.. kindof lost interest in it.. haha..

If i'm wrong.. so be it.. but that's the way I see it..

And oh.. Jens...

Parrots do not have vocal cords, so sound is accomplished by expelling air across the mouth of the bifurcated trachea. Different sounds are produced by changing the depth and shape of trachea. So, talking parrots are really whistling in different variations.

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Im not saying this to be rude, i belived otherwise when i started out(i was told i was a baritone)

these are deeper baritones than me, and they sing tenor better then well all tenors lol ;) atleast in my taste. But this has nothing to do with fach just extremly skilled singers with huge ranges

Jorn Lande

Roy Khan

David Coverdale

Daniel Gildenlow

Axl Rose

Anyways im not here to prove anyone wrong just think about this and let it sink in. train your voice and aim for what YOU want regardless of your fach and i bet you will be suprised.

Oh I didnt know parrots didnt have folds, All mammals have thatone I can say for sure.

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The reason i posted the above about speech not being natural was basicly to point out that many of the things we think are related to fach are infact things of the enviroment.

Wich hopefully make us change the way we look and expekt of our voice. I mean when i went to my first singing teacher she said your a baritone you will never be able to sing rocktenor. Even some really great vocalinstructors said that in my home town.

Now when i went to an instructor she was so amazed at my range and that i was a true tenor blablabla

Only thing that changed was my voice getting stronger and that i decided to use it in a diffrent way...

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Owen just listen to the baritones above, all of the carry chest up to C5. atleast they sound fuller than any tenor up on those notes :P

Sure lower is harder, since that is dependent on size of the vocaltract and folds, but highnotes are dependent on a Tension called the vocal flageolet. If you gain control over that tension you can get whistle basicly as high as you want

But i agree with most people wont ever hit a C8, but thats because in my mind

1. they are not that intrested in it

2. It takes alloooot of training thats booring

3. they dont have a personality that can cope with the training needed(i train perhaps 30% of what i would do if i was a proffessional singer and still ive seen amazing results)

4. notes up there are squeks :P

5. people dont think it's possible, caue when they start out they see no signs of that being possible ever

6. Other people tell them it's impossible

7. they understand what it takes, but then decides heck id get more quality in my voice if i just made it into better quality..

ect ect

I dont belive in limits, I belive in possibilities take the possibilities and see where they take you

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Fachs are only for classical purposes, so yes a tenor can sound like a baritone and a baritone can sound like a tenor

the ranges of those two fachs overlap. Some tenors do not have the folds and resonating ability to go to the bottom of baritone. The lower part of tenor is part of the baritone range. And no amount of theoretically "any animal can make any noise" will change that.

there are a million examples of this. Many classical singers started out as basses and bartiones then ended up as tenors

And, in some cases, they were mistyped to begin with. I am not talking about those who have great skill and dexterity to change from a low fach to a higher one. I mean guys who were expected to be baritones but never had the "right" sound until a new teacher had them try some tenor stuff, even as a lark, and then they grew into that. (No, I am not talking about myself.)

Nature didnt intend speech it's something that we learned as our brains grew bigger, connecting enviromental things through sound. There's a theory that human speech evolved from the sounds we made whilst eating by the fires in the early days.

So, it's a theory. Proven by what?

Isolate a child, dont teach him to speak and all you have is a child with primalsounds like the animals. Animals also have a voicebox.

Sounds like a human mimicking animal sounds, but it is not the same as those animal sounds. I make sounds similar to my pets but it does not sound like them. There's no mistaking my attempt to woof and my dog actually woofing. My dog does sing along with opera but I doubt he is getting a season at the Met. And it sounds like a dog howling in tune with the music, but it cannot be mistaken for actual opera singing.

:D

Very few actually has the personality to bust their ass and get to where they want to be...

Since no one will actually answer my question, I will appropriate this statement to be the answer as to why Steve Perry does not sing bass. Because he doesn't have the personality to work at it. I know I don't have the personality to work at being bass, so I guess that makes me and Steve similar. I mean, we're both human and if all humans are suppsed to be capable of singing really low, we just have not applied ourselves. At last, I finally have an answer.

:cool:

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Ronws im not saying all tenors can be baritones, but im saying all baritones and basses can learn to sing in tenorrange and with tenor type sounds. They have a harder time though

"Sounds like a human mimicking animal sounds, but it is not the same as those animal sounds. I make sounds similar to my pets but it does not sound like them. There's no mistaking my attempt to woof and my dog actually woofing. My dog does sing along with opera but I doubt he is getting a season at the Met. And it sounds like a dog howling in tune with the music, but it cannot be mistaken for actual opera singing"

Ofc i meant he would have HUMAN Primal sounds much like the animals(animals dont have anything but primal sounds) with some exeptions http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LBKVXyrHcw :)

Rowns i belive most can sing very low, even high tenors since you can always improve. If you would only lay all your focus 15 hours of the day singing low, and did so for 10 years. Dont you think you would be able to sing down way lower then the C3 you possess now?

A theory is not proven hence we dont know if it was by the fires or not. I belive ive read parts about in in Oren.L browns Discover your voice

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I have to agree again with Jens. When I joined this forum it was guys like Jens that opened up my mind. I truly thought there was no way in hell I would EVER be able to sing an Adam Lambert song up to G#5. I thought Adam was simply born with his incredible voice and I wasn't. He was lucky and I wasn't. Thankfully, because of this forum, I tested the theory that you don't have to be born with a particular voice do acheive goals never thought possible. And with hard work I proved myself wrong.

Maybe the two camps are pessimists and optimists. I've always been a "glass half full" guy. If there is a possibility I like to try it. I just don't like imposing limits on myself or anyone else.

By the way you can easily adjust the size / volume of our vocal tract by raising / lowering the larynx and widening or narrowing the "tube" and raising / lowering the soft pallet. You can also shorten / lengthen the folds and get them to morph into a wide range of depths / thicknesses. One limit is how far you can tilt - There is a physical limit to that which varies by the person. But you may have to be up around C7 to reach that limit.

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Ronws im not saying all tenors can be baritones, but im saying all baritones and basses can learn to sing in tenorrange and with tenor type sounds. They have a harder time though

I totally agree with that. Any number of lower fachs here, including yourself, are proof that baritones, and even some basses can sing notes in the tenor range, and quite well, such as your recent original song. And your cover of Robert's song. As you have mentioned, you are the perfect example of someone typed by a coach (and we've all been told find a coach) as a baritone, only to find that you are capable of more than that. And that "get a coach" is not nearly as helpful, though it is generically good advice. In fact, I would say that your self-directed study with programs (I think you have used 4 Pillars and CVT, yes?) has taken you to heights and awesomeness that would not be there if you stuck with the original type given you. Which doesn't mean that you are no longer a baritone or incapable anymore of baritone. In theater, they sometimes call someone like you a baritenor. I get that from someone in theater, that's not me making it up. And yes, outside of classical, it doesn't matter, as pop and rock music celebrate any useful sound, not just those that fall within the needs of any certain operatic role.

Rowns i belive most can sing very low, even high tenors since you can always improve. If you would only lay all your focus 15 hours of the day singing low, and did so for 10 years. Dont you think you would be able to sing down way lower then the C3 you possess now?

No, mostly. I might get what's called bass extension down to maybe A2. I cannot hold adduction together, not even falsetto at G2 and below. I can make a woof sound. A throaty growl, as it were. And in rock and pop, that's okay. And I sing rock and pop, not opera.

Definition of improvement may depend on desire. And focus. Please believe me, I am not using Anthony Frisell as an excuse to be lazy. He points out in his book, "The Tenor Voice," if you are a tenor, then you need to train as one. Start in tenor and stay there. And, in training, at least at the beginning, it is possible that you will lose some of the lowest possible notes that you can make. So be it. In most of the material for tenors, you will not be using those very low notes.

Which doesn't mean that I fancy myself to be an opera singer. I am not and I do not plan on singing opera, though I like to goof around with "Ave, Maria" and the art song "Time to say Goodbye." Occasionally, sing along with "Nessun Dorma." Not because I am good at it but because I like to have fun. I would be thrown out of any legit training program, I am sure. :lol:

But of all the critiques I have received, mostly, it has been about pitch control and legato. And so, I worry more about those things. Pitch control, legato, passagio, breath control.

I get what you are saying. What if I spent a decade working just the low end. Could I accomplish a full baritone, just from the training alone? I don't think so. Structure does have an effect. Shall I bring up the example of the castrati? Or how, without any specific training or attempts at voice mod, there are some women who speak lower than I do? Fundamental freq is fundamental freq. Can't get around that.

And, for years, I tried to speak lower, to sound more "manly." Didn't work. All I did was sound throaty. Kind of like Melissa Etheridge, though not as good -looking. :lol:

Granted, it was not singer training, but I was successful in detuning myself for a long time. Giving that up freed me up, a lot.

None of what I have said is to imply that others cannot sing above their nominal range, if you want to call that chest, or not. And really, the thread started out about singing above your "natural" range, whatever that is, not below it. So, in the end, I was probably wrong for introducing that.

So, above what, then? Most everyone, even tenors, have a resonance shift at about D5 that is inescapable. Generally speaking, tenor is approx c3 to c5. Does that mean, when I sing an a5, I am above my natural range? Is it a dynamic sound, rather than an artistic one?

And so, I might be agreeing with you. Limits are imposed as one defines them by desire and focus of repertoire. However, I think it is on the higher end, more than the lower end. I think the lower end is mostly a physical limit by means of structure.

You can flagelot much higher than I can sing full voice. And you can sing lower than I can, with volume and resonance. You are unique and awesome.

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We always seem to have this "fach" discussion.. There is no need to speak of this in popular music(pop, rock,r&b,jazz) Is is simply like Jens posted in post #13. I think many people get discouraged and think their range will be cut short if they are called a baritone and some people use it as an excuse. Don't limit yourselves.

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I am glad you all came to an agreement of sorts.

I have to admit that going higher than your normal range at least seems more attainable than going lower. You can get to a lower note but to have a deepness and richness in the voice that defines Bass or Baritone relys on having the proper thickness of cords to begin with.

I am also of the mind that the sound of your voice is a mixture of genetics and invironment. I imitate voices. Speaking not singing. But if I am using a southern accent (Geogia, Carolinas,Kentucky....) My voice naturally goes a little higher by 4 notes at least. Imitating French accent it goes lower by 2 notes...

I have learned to speak so only the person next to me can hear me talk, because others would take what I say and use it against me.( Lots of kids in my family). So I speak softly and carry a big stick.

My cousin learned to speak loudly almost shouting, because no one would hear him or pay any attention to him when he spoke(Lots of kids in his family). He intimidates through his voice and actions.

If we were speaking to you over the phone you would not be able to tell us apart. But while singing or in a crowd there is no similarities.

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