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At a loss of power

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DoverOs
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I've run into a wall. I can go from my chest, to my head mix, to my head, but I still can't bring my chest tone any higher than my head-mix. The thing is, I feel the connection, support, and power behind my head notes all the way through them, but they have no chest tones coming out of them. The moment I get past d5, my chesty tone goes away.

So I don't really know what to do. I'm already in a head voice which seems natural, pure, and connected and supported as much as possible, but I can't get the tone working past the mix.

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You can't bring the chest tone any higher than head-mix, because a pure head voice just has no chest quality in it that you could amplify using larynx dampening.

Getting a "chesty tone" in the head voice always implies taking a minimal amount of chest voice up there and then amplifying it using larynx tuning. If there is no chesty tone already present, there is nothing you could amplify.

That said, from what I know, at about E5 pure head voice starts for just about ANY male singer, even the higher tenors, so no more chest quality starting at around E5.

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Here's a link of me going up notes with may and la.

http://www.mediafire.com/?5poa7k11888a4bh or http://205.196.123.23/q2dj41bilheg/5poa7k11888a4bh/rangemayla.mp3

c5-Eb5 is the hardest area for me to have a natural sounding mix+head voice. I can get up to the c5-Eb5 area on single notes, but I don't perform well in very compact phrases.

Higher than Eb5 is obviously thinner than the previous voice, and has even less chest in it. I can sing them louder than it seems on the recording, but it's still very thin sounding regardless.

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Dover, once you hit your second bridge, you have to rely on amplifying certain frequencies (harmonics) in order for your tome to sound fuller - at least that's what I understand . I am not training that yet , so I can't tell you more.

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Keith, I was working on what you said, and I made an improvement. I believe I have a large lack of these formants and frequencies, and it seems to be helping now that I'm working on them. I've always had the tendency to stick to a singing approach where I want my muscles to do all the coloring/toning for me, but that seemed to have left me untrained with these formants.

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Dover, are you equating "chest" with "power"?

The reason I ask is that you mention the 2nd passagio, which is not really a passagio, it is a tonal shift, which I have mentioned a number of other times. But that tonal shift does not necessarily mean loss of power,as in volume. However, it may lack "chest" to the degree that you are used to having in notes lower than D5.

"Chest" and "power" are two different things, in my view.

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Dover, are you equating "chest" with "power"?

The reason I ask is that you mention the 2nd passagio, which is not really a passagio, it is a tonal shift, which I have mentioned a number of other times. But that tonal shift does not necessarily mean loss of power,as in volume. However, it may lack "chest" to the degree that you are used to having in notes lower than D5.

"Chest" and "power" are two different things, in my view.

Ya I would agree. I tend to use the term chest because that's the sound I want the head voice to emulate. I really mean power.

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You can have power above D5, and it will not be chest. Even for tenors, let alone baritones. Unless you want to follow the description of chest from Anthony Frisell, which a lot of people don't want to do. In his definition, what we call chest is really a matter of volume and resonance, which can happen anywhere, not just in the range of notes we normally associate with chest. But, for some reason, that definition and insight is rejected handily, and quite frequently. Not much I can do about that.

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dover, just with listening as an only guide, it's sounds to me like you have not engaged support from the onset. you started off with too little fold compression and the sound "may la" (never heard of that one before) will call for more involvement from your support to hold things together.

why not just try a nice, loud, crisp, "may"....nice and loud, with a little bit of a cry to the sound.....simple 5 tone scale.

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