Jump to content

WEIGHT

Rate this topic


D.Starr
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey guys,

Just wondered if anyone had any good exercises for practicing losing weight of the cords as you scale up.

Pulling a lot of chest that's all around E4.

Short and sweet thread. You know my troubles, need to re-iterate.

Edit:

Edge staccato?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When ascending, think "smaller note." Because it is. The pitch of a note is frequency, which is the number of repeats of wave peaks within a second. A-440 is 440 Hz. That means whatever is vibrating is doing so with the repeat of the peak of the wave 440 times in one second. That will be a shorter wavelength than the distance between wave peaks for a G2, for example. It really is physics. Therefore, higher notes, shorter wavelengths, shorter resonating spaces.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^ you could try a lot of descending slides while attempting to keep that "headyness" all the way down to your speaking voice. You will notice your speaking voice will feel more flexible, now if only you could remember that feeling next time you go up :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Squeezing usually happens if your twang is ok, but you are pushing too much air through your larynx. Most of the time this means support is not good.

Do you learn with TVS? If you do here is what I use to induce support. Insted of using the "M"-buzzing-onset that is typically used in the TVS-lectures, I use an "N"-based onset. Just use the "N" as you know it from resonant tracking instead of the "M".

I then imagine some focal point just at the position where the tip of my tongue touches the hard palate (just behind the upper front teeth). This ist the point I "press against". Don't sing from that point. Imagine you sing "against" that point from down below. Use an 'eh'-vowel for trying this.

While doing this make sure that you still use the resonant track. So imagine, that, because you don't let the sound go past that focal point it has to take a detour and leave your head through the resonant pathway.

You can also use an N-G-EH for that exercise, which makes it a little easier to activate the resonant track. But remember to concentrate all your pressure on the tongue-point for the N, not for the G and aim for the root of your nose or a point "between your eyes".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys

I tend to squeeze a lot. The W is kinda helping early days so.

Any ideas on this?

d, it's critical to not confuse this thinning with lightening of the voice. you should be thinningbut that doesn't mean you always need to be lightening.

you still need support and proper fold adduction up high and you need to keep the larynx from jumping up by maintaining an open airway with a "yawn like" configuration....don't close down up high.

you will find that with "feel" and practise, you will figure out the correct level of compression and support you need as the voice ascends in pitch.

you never want to muscle up or punch or stab at high notes.....but you don't need to lighten either.

i know a lot of folks here will argue that, and it's just me talking from experience but again it all depends on the singer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob pointer is spot on.

The reason why you are squeezing can very well be simply because you are trying to let go of pressure when you should not. In this case, after you get around the initial discomfort of applying pressure in a way you are not used to, it will become considerably easier to do it.

Walking in this Squeeze/Try to lighten state is a dead end. Either you register out of the coordination and let the register change, or you stay on it. Dont try to walk between them because there is nothing to walk on, this thing the guy is demonstrating is just a tense squeak attempting to coordinate as full voice. Look at his neck, what is all that tension for? Voice comming all low, even creaks and a weird drive/rasp...

Its no wonder people get so suspicious when I tell them to get orientation. A teacher should be able to demonstrate exercises to do this like a breeze, and the worst thing is that he doesnt even get close to the ammount of energy necessary to do the proposed exercise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dstarr you are looking in to many places you need too pick a road and then don't look back for a while. I'm noticing a lot of questions and posts from all directions not a good way to train. To many opposing arguments.. Go with a path of least resistance. Sing as high as you can with the least amount of effort..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, what Felipe mentions is also a very important point. Many teachers will tell you that "pushing" is bad in general. But in fact "pushing" (in terms of pushing with your exhalation musculature) is absolutely neccessary, especially during passagio.

Of course, too much pushing is bad. But that can be said for any vocal technique. Too much twang is also bad, too much lightening or thinning is also bad.

This was something that has been confusing me for a long time too. If your passaggio is clunky, most of the time you think "I'm not lightening" enough, which is often because many teachers put the focus too much on "thinning, thinning, thinning" and won't tell you that you need to "push" or in other words "keep high body tension" during passaggio.

This is often a psychological thing. Robert sometimes talks about "the fear of singing in M2" in his lectures. But teachers that focus too much on removing "the fear of singing in M2" often cause another syndrome which is "the fear of belting" or "fear of pushing".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel as if I'm gripping and building pressure in my neck.

No matter how much I try I feel I'm taking up too much weight.

Tried a few more vocalises from Pillars today, think I'm over twanging. Cords are really grinding.

It's hard to translate the exercises to singing.

Lifting up and pulling back is proving strange because I tend to focus the sound forward in the mask. I feel like if I pull back it's going into the back of my throat and hollowing out rather than becoming brighter. If that makes sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's funny, because I have the same problem as you. For some songs I don't really know how to approach the louder parts, such as in Locked out of heaven by Bruno Mars. I tend to use the back of my throat way to much. When I'm singing like that I have no pain, but when I'm done with it, my throat feels overthightened.

I'd like to have a bit of help on this as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel as if I'm gripping and building pressure in my neck.

No matter how much I try I feel I'm taking up too much weight.

Tried a few more vocalises from Pillars today, think I'm over twanging. Cords are really grinding.

It's hard to translate the exercises to singing.

Lifting up and pulling back is proving strange because I tend to focus the sound forward in the mask. I feel like if I pull back it's going into the back of my throat and hollowing out rather than becoming brighter. If that makes sense.

Try this, see if it helps:

First, do an yawn, and try to notice the sensations it produces. Dont assume anything please, go from a real yawn. Notice that it usually has two sensations, one up on the direction of the soft palate, and another sensation is the one kinda related to "open throat". Eliminate that "open throat" feeling from the coordiation and use just the beginning of THIS partial yawn as the lift up.

So its a very gentle sensation, dont just open ALL the way, a small sensation on the soft palate is enough. Try aiming for a bit of nasality first to make sure that everything is relaxed.

If you exagerate the yawn, specially that lower sensation, it will make it hollow, and either it will become airy or you will be forced to register into falsetto.

If it works, check it on a mirror, you will see that what is really doing the work there is your tongue :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

all great points benny, felipe.....

d, the more you work the voice out, the easier it will become..as time goes on, you will have this power and resonance you can't foresee right now...trust me.

you won't need to push anything...you go from pushing to applying.

it's sort of analygous to if you work out with a 10 lb. weight and then you sense that 10 lbs. is too easy, you move up to 15 lbs. that 10 lbs. was once what the 15 lb. resistance is now.

damn, it's so hard to explain......let's try it this way..the stronger you get vocally the more you can pinpoint the vocal folds and engage them to do what they were designed to do.

all the extraneous musculature and tension starts to go away because your conditioning enables you to isolate and apply only those muscles that are required to sing.

does that help?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...