Jump to content

Voice Lessons for Business Presentations (as opposed to singing)?

Rate this topic


Knah
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone;

I'm looking into taking voice lessons to enhance my ability to present in business settings. A good voice is more important than many people in business think. Strong tonality is especially crucial in sales.

Can anyone recommend a voice trainer who would be good for non-singing voice training? (or should I just practice with any good vocal teacher?)

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I found a college professor who'll charge me $40-$50 per hour for 1 on 1 sessions--is that a good deal?

Can anyone recommend a good trainer who does Skype lessons?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 to 50 dollars for an hour session is competitive. You probably won't find much better than that for a live coach standing right next to you.

Of the people here who can coach you via skype there is, of course, Robert Lunte, benefactor of this forum and author of the 4 Pillars of Singing.

Daniel Formica also does skype.

A number of modern voice teachers are able to consult and teach via skype, which, I guess, kind of takes the fire out of needing a coach standing right next you in the same room.

Another member, no longer in the forum pointed out that one can receive good local coaching such as you have found, for just about the price that you have mentioned and you can learn the basics of good singing that way.

And of the sources I have studied, very much so, good public speaking should come from the same place as singing. So, even if you never sing a song or a recital, it will help your public speaking. Though, often, public speakers who take singing training find that they enjoy it and get into singing, as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kate Devore is author of "The Voice Book" and might be of help.

Her homepage is http://www.totalvoice.net

Here is her bio:

Kate DeVore, M.A., CCC-SLP, is a Voice/Speech pathologist specialized in professional voice, a theatre voice. speech and dialect trainer, and a personal development coach. She has an M.A. in Speech Pathology (communication disorders) with an emphasis in professional voice, and a B.A. in Theatre with an emphasis in acting and voice. She is also a Reiki master teacher and is certified in Vibrational Healing.

Kate is co-author of The Voice Book: Caring For, Protecting, and Improving Your Voice (Chicago Review Press) and the Laryngeal Teaching Series DVDs showing endoscopic footage of the inside of the throat during speaking, singing, and other sound production (http://www.LoveYourVoice.com). She is also co-creator of downloadable dialect training materials (http://www.AccentHelp.com) and author of downloadable material for Accent Modification and clear American speech (http://www.GeneralAmericanAccent.com).

Kate has given numerous workshops and presentations on voice, speech, and healing arts and has authored many articles. She works with clients ranging from actors to executives on voice, speech, and personal development. She bridges the right and left brain by integrating scientific principles and theories with artistic and holistic training modalities.

Kate has worked at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School), The Voice Center at The University of Illinois Chicago Hospital, Roosevelt University, Columbia College, Wellesley College, Brandeis University, Emerson College, the Acting Studio Chicago, and many other theatre companies and training programs in Boston and Chicago. She also served on the board of directors of VASTA (Voice and Speech Trainers Association).

Whether working with voice, speech, dialect, personal development, or healing, her goal is to connect with the client and to synthesize information and its essence in an efficient, effective, and loving manner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The voice is very important. As my singing voice has steadily improved over the years, so has my speaking voice, and my confidence and relationships. The voice is literally what we use to bridge the gap between our self and another human being, so I believe it is very important and I wish you all the best in training and learning to improve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Though singing and talking can be similar in the vocal shape and even technique, the training and time involved of these, are, I estimate, vastly different. Singing frequently involves training to create a melodic and a rounded tonal sound, and these involve getting rid of various interfering vocal-speaking habits and tensions. Speaking communications, in sales (though perhaps not in seduction), involves more communicating clearly with one's existing vocal-speaking habits, which have been learned through a lifetime. So, Smokey said it well "You'd better shop around," and a good singing instructor may be inappropriate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I have read and believe, the speaking voice is inside the singing voice, not the other way around.

Speaking for most people involves less air control and lower pitch and all kinds of bad habits related to language, local dialect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...