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Brightness of tone

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Consumingfire39
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I'm no master at it, but this is how I discovered how to artificially brighten my voice:

Twang and a high larynx become the foundation of the sound. It's like I reset my voice's attractor state to be more like that of someone who naturally twangs and has more trouble getting the larynx down. It comes from a really bright place to begin with and then if you want you can tweak it slightly darker if you want.

Try it on a very light mass head voice...use an "aa" (as in cat) vowel and make it really well connected, all twang, no airiness. Make sure the aa is created by a raised larynx, without doing much with upper vocal tract. Then from there experiment with ways to add some more beef to it. I would then go on to "haa" and add that extra air behind it to fuel up some more support and musculature. Move it slightly toward an "eh" or "ah" vowel if you don't like it that quacky.

Allow the digastric muscle to tense up. I seem to really need it for this type of thing. But there is no constriction elsewhere really, just the muscles under the chin.

If you want to do with a little more airy tone like the singer in your link, I'd say just let go of the squeeze a bit and just keep a high larynx.

Keep in mind I am by no means good at this. I just figured out how to do it one day - I found this bright voice. But I rarely use it because it's much inferior to the way I normally sing. Rob has really tried to steer me away from this bright voice thing, it has a tendency to make the pitch squirl around, it doesn't sound pleasant, it's just kind of overall bad technique.

But just as an effect, it may have use. I don't know, I haven't tried that yet.

I feel like the more twang I use, the more my larynx stays down. I have done the "aa" is in cat and I can seem to get it very bright on vowels and while training but it drops significantly when I go to sing. I am sure it is already bright enough by I was very throaty for years and am trying to avoid that as much as possible.

Also, I can barely even tense my digastric muscle anymore. I trained myself out of even being able to tense it if I wanted to.

Do you think that is the technique that the artist in the video I linked is using?

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I have no technical comments, just wanted to add that I am a long time fan of Coheed and Cambria and Claudio's voice is just crazy. What an unusual, distinct tone he has! So much character and colour within his vocal performances; a lot of light and dark.

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I have no technical comments, just wanted to add that I am a long time fan of Coheed and Cambria and Claudio's voice is just crazy. What an unusual, distinct tone he has! So much character and colour within his vocal performances; a lot of light and dark.

Nice! I have been a huge fan for many years as well. I think he is better vocally right now than he has ever been and by a good margin. I think he actually took some lessons and really improved his technique. On the recent tour with Iron Maiden he was covering Dio's Heaven and Hell and getting huge props for it. He could have never done that until recently. "The Hard Sell" really shows how diverse he has become vocally.

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Then you must have not found twang. They are things that can be easily mistaken for twang, such as the upper harmonics created by increased TA activity, more compression, etc. But real twang naturally brings the larynx up so it is harder to twang with a lower larynx. Not to say that it is always going to be a struggle, but on any untrained singer they're going to have the most trouble combining the two, it's just how the musculature works.

I honestly don't think Claudio is doing what I described. He sounds to me like he is just a natural tenor. But the only way I would be able to get close to his tone is by raising my larynx.

You can barely tense the digastric muscle? Jeez, I can't even get the thing to relax fully on notes that feel easy to me. Are you sure, have you felt it while singing? You mean it's just totally fleshy and soft even on loud high notes?'

Did it get that way as a result of good support or did you actually do the thumbs under the chin thing?

I have probably just been using more upper harmonics instead of twang now that you say that, as well as more compression. Maybe I have never been twanging at all recently.

I trained out the tightening of the digastric muscle and yes it is through support. When I first started I would use thumbs under the chin and after a couple of days it completely went away, which might have also hurt my ability to twang. I have finally gotten my support to where I am actually overdoing it and restricting my ability to move through registers. The amount of support I use is perfect for doing anything classical but now I need to learn to lessen the support for other styles of singing. It is kind of hard to explain but I the right amount of Chiaroscuro and resonance for classical, while using that support but I don't want non-classical songs to sound the same way.

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I get what you mean, in fact I'm going to have to go check, I think there is a way I can sing, one of the darkest approaches I can handle in the head voice, where I may not be tensing the digastric muscle. I haven't checked it, but it sounds similar to what you're describing here. It makes bridging a little harder, makes those high harmonics seem to come from nowhere, etc. Rob would call it a more appoggio-based approach. And he recommends I stick with it and work through it, but I am finding it has some disadvantages. I don't know. It's definitely better than the artificially brightened way though. And there is a middle ground that I think I like best, it's a little of both - partly support, partly intrinsic anchoring.

It's almost like the brighter you get, the more the larynx has to do the work, the darker you get, the more the support has to do the work...sort of...

That makes a lot of sense as my whole approach is appoggio-based. I don't know if I should train both ways or if that is counter productive. I have had a ton of results from what I have been doing but then impatience gets the better of me.

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