Jump to content

The Missing Link - Cord Closure

Rate this topic


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey all I would like to mention that after breathing, cord closure would be my 2nd go-to area when there is problems with my voice. Ie: head voice without cord closure = falsetto. The reason we use twang is not only for brightness but for cord closure as well.

But here's the issue... if you can't "feel" the cords close how do you know when your cord closure is good? Look at this is way if I say a well supported "EE" sound and hold it... the vocal cords are closing rapidly during that time but I don't FEEL them close.

Currently I'm using "eh, ah" on a 5 tone scale (Thanks Daniel Formica) and making "ah" feel like "eh" which is helping a great deal. My next plan of attack is to learn cord closure from the head register with closed vowels (oo oo ee ee)

How can I get a gauge on my cord closure? I can definitely feel things fall apart sometimes through the passaggio and into head voice.

If the feeling of good cord closure is almost "imaginary" how can I work towards achieving good closure in the undeveloped areas of my voice? I mentioned before how I could go ah ah fine in my speaking voice but really struggling with it in falsetto. I know the vocal cords are very small like a finger nail and even smaller the higher up I go.. so how can I learn to feel the closure of the vocal cords when everything is so small?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, Jay, it would be nice to hear a sample from you to hear what you are talking about. The description is not doing much for me.

Even if it's just a phone recording. Something even Felipe has done, from time to time. And Jonpall. Just recording on the phone and sending to their own email to be saved and then uploaded to any of half a dozen file sharing sites. I have no idea what your voice sounds like to even determine that what you are saying makes sense. It makes me want to pull a "Felipe" on you and advise getting coach. There is only so much we can do with the written word. When I first came to this forum, all I had was a $14 desk mic I bought at Office Depot. Granted, it didn't display my voice well, but it was something. Anyone with a computer capable of posting in this forum has some kind of sound capabilities and Windows has a sound recorder. It's what Videohere uses when he posts just a sample, as rare as that is.

Why is sound so important? Because I have sang a full voice clean note in "head" and even had someone else confirm it for me but, in recording, others here have thought it was falsetto. And I don't know if that is what it really sounded like to them or if falsetto is the only way they can sing as high as I do and they are then assuming that I must be using falsetto because they would have to.

I even shared a song and pointed out where in the song I used falsetto and where I used full voice that was clean. Chirping crickets was the reply.

So, maybe even a recording of you would not help. In which case, you need a live coach and could ignore us.

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is another nice excercise that gives you "a feel" for closed vocal cords. It is similar to resonant tracking, but forces the cord closure a little bit more effectively.

You basically do humming on an "MMMMMM", but while doing this you put the tip of the tongue between your lips and let it remain there while doing the humming.

While doing this imagine to sing right into your nose or "through your nose". You can also try to release into a vowel on certain pitches.

However, you have to know that this only induces "the best possible" cord closure, so at really high notes (falsetto, whistle) it will only close parts of your vocal folds. But I still believe (yes, limitations, I said it again) that there really is a physical limit in terms of full cord closure (and that also means a physical limit for full voice).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However, you have to know that this only induces "the best possible" cord closure, so at really high notes (falsetto, whistle) it will only close parts of your vocal folds. But I still believe (yes, limitations, I said it again) that there really is a physical limit in terms of full cord closure (and that also means a physical limit for full voice).

I like it when you talk dirty. The ugly elephant in the middle of the room. And limits are guides to discovering what it is that one's own unique voice can do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey all I would like to mention that after breathing, cord closure would be my 2nd go-to area when there is problems with my voice. Ie: head voice without cord closure = falsetto. The reason we use twang is not only for brightness but for cord closure as well.

But here's the issue... if you can't "feel" the cords close how do you know when your cord closure is good? Look at this is way if I say a well supported "EE" sound and hold it... the vocal cords are closing rapidly during that time but I don't FEEL them close.

Currently I'm using "eh, ah" on a 5 tone scale (Thanks Daniel Formica) and making "ah" feel like "eh" which is helping a great deal. My next plan of attack is to learn cord closure from the head register with closed vowels (oo oo ee ee)

How can I get a gauge on my cord closure? I can definitely feel things fall apart sometimes through the passaggio and into head voice.

If the feeling of good cord closure is almost "imaginary" how can I work towards achieving good closure in the undeveloped areas of my voice? I mentioned before how I could go ah ah fine in my speaking voice but really struggling with it in falsetto. I know the vocal cords are very small like a finger nail and even smaller the higher up I go.. so how can I learn to feel the closure of the vocal cords when everything is so small?

post a sample of you doing it so we can hear exactly what's going on Jay.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While we wait waiting for Jay to record a sample, I don't think one is actually going to "feel" better cord closure. You are going to hear it. Or, better yet, a coach or assistant is going to hear it, or something that sounds a lot like it. Then, again, I am not looking for strain or consciousness of the larynx but the absence of it.

For when we say "full cord closure," what does that mean? Everything zipped up except for the aperture? And what is the micrometer measured distance of that? And how do you explain Steven Tyler and his genetic defect, having two apertures or dos glotti? (Something you can't train, it just happens.)

I mean, something is happening and I am not trying to make light of it. But I have gone from a full voice sound to a falsetto sound on purpose (I do it at the end of "I Don't Believe in Love"). But I can't say that I move the adductor ratchet down two notches, or something like that. For me, actually, it felt like a shift from full resonant to not as much and a change from high pressure (relatively) to low pressure, though I could certainly be wrong.

Come on, Jay, make us a recording, pretty please ....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...