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I cant sing with my falsetto anymore.

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RHan
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I need help because i cant sing with falsetto anymore, and hardly to sing with my headvoice. Since then its hard, i mean i CANT hit any high note anymore.

All start when i had flu and sore throat like a month ago. Then i start coughing and stuffs, but while im still sick I still went for jamming session with my friends. But i think it will be just okay since i didnt strain too much. But after 2-3 days, i hardly can talk. I feel horseness with my voice and sounds so deep. But my friends said its normal and it will heal after few days. But now after a month, yes i have my normal chest voice again. But i still cant sing with falsetto and head voice. Why this happening? What can i do to get back my normal singing voice? We need to train for coming performance, but this sucks because i CANT sing. T_T

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Sang a jam session while you had the flu? Yes, you did strain yourself. Singing with a sore throat and the flu? You were just begging for it. Self-induced partial laryngitis. Don't think I am mad at you or making you seem silly. I did the same thing to myself while in perfect health, trying to do something that I shouldn't do. For myself, I reserve the name, idiot with a capital I.

Anyway, your friends don't know enough and I don't say that to hurt their feelings. I speak from harsh experience. I injured myself on one song one time. But I did it twice because I thought was doing a type of distortion the wrong way the first time, since I don't think I know everything, and the knowledge that I don't know everything separates me from a lot of people. Anyway, it took two weeks of speaking only when spoken to, no singing. And when I did start again, it was warm-ups only, light and soft.

So, I don't know when your gig is but you are stuck in recovery. Drink lots of water. It will flush out whatever flu bug you have. And it will keep your vocal folds hydrated and raise your basal metabolic rate, which should help healing.

And then, this is very important, don't do that again. Ever. I don't give a flying jump into the lake how excited you are. When your voice says "no," listen to it. You only have one voice. Your friends who think this will only last a few days, they have guitars on which they can replace strings and electronics. The drummer has extra head to replace the ones that he breaks. You only have one voice and it is irreplacable. Please, respect that fact.

I speak from harsh experience, I have broken every rule there is to break, including my own.

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And then, this is very important, don't do that again. Ever. I don't give a flying jump into the lake how excited you are. When your voice says "no," listen to it. You only have one voice. Your friends who think this will only last a few days, they have guitars on which they can replace strings and electronics. The drummer has extra head to replace the ones that he breaks. You only have one voice and it is irreplacable. Please, respect that fact.

+1 to that. I was a guitarist in my last band and was frustrated by how often our singer would get sick and cancel practice. In reality he should have taken even more days off to recover completely (as well as do some actually rehearsing at home while healthy to build stamina).

Even if a band functions as a democracy the singer is in some sort of priviliged position to the extent that minor illness affects his performance and/or longevity much more than the other instrumentalists.

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Everyone gets to party except the singer. The other instruments are external and can be re-built, re-finished, replaced.

The singing voice, to quote Pat Benatar, is "flesh, muscle, and psyche." And it cannot be replaced. of the muscles in the throat, you can tone them, to some extent, although singer training is more about coordination than it is strength training. And the actual source of the sound you make, singing or speaking is membrane. And membrane is NOT, I repeat, NOT muscle. There is now way to "grow" membrane, or to train "thicker" membrane. So help me God, I will repeat that until I have no more breath, flailing uselessly, no doubt, against those of the religious faith that the can somehow train membrane to be something other than it is.

Membrane is membrane. Here is what it can do. It can inflame, due to irritation, either through misuse or other irritation, such as sinus drainage, infection from various sources, including the systemic infection of influenza. There are plenty of articles saying that you can sing with a cold. For the love of all that is beautiful or power in your voice, please, DON'T. If it is a chest cold, your support is crap and you will build bad habits. If it is a head cold, you will have sinus drainage down the throat and on to the folds. Either way, don't do it.

So what if you have a gig. Even if you are lucky, most bands last for five years. A voice must last forever.

Here's what else membranes can do. They can build a callus known as a nodule or node, from repeated abrasion. It is a toughening of the surface to prevent further tearing. It is a defense mechanism and it will cause loss of range and tone. Other times, the strain can cause a blood blister, known as a polyp, though polyps can come about through genetic predisposition and I know some hate to hear about genetics. Sorry about your luck. Live with it. Genetics is a factor and now amount of positive thinking is going to change that.

Nodes caught early on are sometimes reduced or removed through voice therapy where, you guessed it, you learn to NOT do what got you the node in the first place.

Other times, surgery is needed and any scar can have a permanent effect.

Even Seinfeld from Biohazard has permanently damaged his voice. Even after surgery, he has less than an octave range and it is a hoarse growl. How bad do you want that rasp in your voice? Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it.

I know other band members hate it but a singer often completes the band. And without the singer, you have an instrumental group. Eric Johnson, from Texas, is a great instrumentalist. And he has never sold as many albums as a band with a singer. Life's not fair, live with it.

The singer has to conxerve his one true asset and it usually boils down to not overusing the voice in rehearsal and performance. That's why a singer should keep in his gig bag, a couple of mics, some throat spray, and a billy club to deal with the house engineer mixing the sound and the monitors. You need the billy club to first get the attention of the sound guy who has an infatuation with the guitars, and then drive your points home. I can offer lessons in the use of the billy club, if you need them.

:D

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Well said sir. I never knew the consequences of not taking care my voice is really bad. I even do some screams while i was sick, just to show to my friend that im so good even sick. Now all i can do is to seek for a specialist, and hoping he will diagnosed me that everything is fine and all i need is rest. I really hope that I will get second chance to use my voice at best again, and surely i will take note everything you've written.

Thank you sir.

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Well said sir. I never knew the consequences of not taking care my voice is really bad. I even do some screams while i was sick, just to show to my friend that im so good even sick. Now all i can do is to seek for a specialist, and hoping he will diagnosed me that everything is fine and all i need is rest. I really hope that I will get second chance to use my voice at best again, and surely i will take note everything you've written.

Thank you sir.

First off, yes, rest. If you try to sing right now, you will build bad habits compensating for what you could normally do. Go to an ENT that helps singers. With luck, you may not need surgery. From there, you may go to a voice therapist. Please, please, please, look up our fellow member Joanna Cazden for resources of specialists in your area, as well as general vocal health knowledge. She is the resident expert, bar none. And she has a generosity of spirit in giving information.

And get well. I would like to hear you sing, some time.

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