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True Powerful Dampening

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The video speaks for itself. I don't even understand what he is saying. But compared to the "uh" shading video that Robert Lunte put up you will notice a difference...

The voice is RINGING even with a dampened harmonic. There is no amplification (very old video) the voice is BOOMY yet resonant and maintains its beauty whilst having an open throat.

Now for the tenors in this forum who have accepted the "lightness" of their fach, don't bother posting. This man is a tenor yet his sound is stylistically very different than the "popish" sound of other light singers.

What is technically going on here? What can I do to achieve such beautiful dark sound without forcing the larynx down...

Hope some vocal enthusiasts enjoy this video! Old school!!! :cool:

- JayMC

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jay,

sing for many years!

if you research this, after years go by of classical training with appoggio or one voice singing, the inside of the phanrnx (throat) expands which contributes to the deeper sound.......like trumpeter dizzy gillespie's cheeks expanded after years of flexing. watch the video.

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The video speaks for itself. I don't even understand what he is saying. But compared to the "uh" shading video that Robert Lunte put up you will notice a difference...

The voice is RINGING even with a dampened harmonic. There is no amplification (very old video) the voice is BOOMY yet resonant and maintains its beauty whilst having an open throat.

Now for the tenors in this forum who have accepted the "lightness" of their fach, don't bother posting. This man is a tenor yet his sound is stylistically very different than the "popish" sound of other light singers.

What is technically going on here? What can I do to achieve such beautiful dark sound without forcing the larynx down...

Hope some vocal enthusiasts enjoy this video! Old school!!! :cool:

- JayMC

JayMC: Del Monaco was a world-class Operatic Lyric (perhaps even Spinto) tenor, at the height of his prowess when this recording was made. He is doing these things:

1) Significant, and consistent twang, which with his vowels and laryngeal positioning comes across as "Singer's Formant".

2) Expanded lower pharynx, which clusters formants 3,4 and 5 to intensify the twang.

3) Resonance-tunes every vowel perfectly for each note, the syllable he is singing, and modifies the correct amount every time. You see the varying amounts of jaw drop... that is part of it.

4) In the transition to the top, he closes the vowels through the passagio, but it sounds perfectly consistent with the upper part of his chest voice, which he is singing at less than full-power.

5) No wasted air. All of it is going into the sound.

If you want to learn to sing like this, then the techniques are all well known in the classical singing world. However, the natural dimensions of the spaces in the neck and head will determine where your tessitura will be. It is not necessary to 'force' the larynx down. The most advanced techniques in this area are for the singer to negate the laryngeal upward-pull habit, (which takes some time for certain voices) so that the larynx can be 'let' to go to the perfect low elevation.

I hope this is helpful.

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