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Voice that doesn't crack

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Consumingfire39
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It's not wrong for the voice to not crack in practice. It's always something to avoid doing, the ideal is to not crack because that means your technique is incorrect. But it just tends to happen if you are really challenging yourself and not quite getting it right. That being said I wouldn't be surprised if there are some people who have better natural vocal physiology where they almost never crack. I guess consider yourself lucky if you feel like you are challenging your voice and it has yet to fail on you.

The voice cracks whenever something in your technique is significantly "off". So either you have always had good technique, or are working below your means (e.g. a tenor misclassified as a baritone).

eggplantbren has a good point. Specifically glottal attacks, those tend to make people crack because they tend to configure the vocal apparatus to slam the folds shut and then try to push air through that, which is totally not how singing is supposed to work. The air flow should occur ever so slightly before the cord closure. The silent "h" is a great onset. You let out a teeny bit of silent air and then let the folds naturally come together and the resulting sound is a very quick and smooth ramp up to the phonation. Not "Aaaaah", not "HHHaaaah", but "(h)aaaaah".

Thanks for the response, it clears a lot up.

I have heard different instructors talk about getting to a place when you are about to break or crack when talking about finding a registration change or for finding my vocal fach and I don't know what they mean by it.

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My voice has never once cracked (As people on this forum explain) in my life. What does this mean? Does it mean I am not pushing the boundaries enough? What is actually happening when the voice cracks?

ConsumingFire: A 'crack' is nothing more than an audible difference in tone quality because of a sudden, uncontrolled change in the way the laryngeal muscles are coordinating. The uncontrolled change will affect the phonated wave-form, and that is what we hear. A crack can occur for many reasons, but the most common is a mis-balance between breath, adduction, registration and resonance.

If you have never cracked, then you are doing some things right. However, its possible for most guys to 'sing safely' and not crack when staying in the Octave-and-a-fifth range from A2 to E4. Cracking is much more likely when transitioning to the upper 1/3 of the vocal range, because the resonance adjustment and breath coordination become a bit trickier to accomplish and keep consistent.

I hope this is helpful.

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RJD's voice cracked while taping a song. It happens. Back up, re-group, take another stab at it. Producers be compin' vocals.

I can't find the video anymore but it was a behind the scenes look at the recording sessions for "We Are Stars." And during RJD's takes, he cracked and had to retake the bridge.

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RJD's voice cracked while taping a song. It happens. Back up, re-group, take another stab at it. Producers be compin' vocals.

I can't find the video anymore but it was a behind the scenes look at the recording sessions for "We Are Stars." And during RJD's takes, he cracked and had to retake the bridge.

ronws: Even in a solid voice, fatigue can be a factor.

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ConsumingFire: A 'crack' is nothing more than an audible difference in tone quality because of a sudden, uncontrolled change in the way the laryngeal muscles are coordinating. The uncontrolled change will affect the phonated wave-form, and that is what we hear. A crack can occur for many reasons, but the most common is a mis-balance between breath, adduction, registration and resonance.

If you have never cracked, then you are doing some things right. However, its possible for most guys to 'sing safely' and not crack when staying in the Octave-and-a-fifth range from A2 to E4. Cracking is much more likely when transitioning to the upper 1/3 of the vocal range, because the resonance adjustment and breath coordination become a bit trickier to accomplish and keep consistent.

I hope this is helpful.

Most things I sing are at or above E4 for much of the song. Mainly songs by artists like David Phelps, Geoff Tate, etc.

I do have a problem with getting my sound stuck in my throat a lot and not resonating properly.

I have chronic severe sinusitis and it is bad of a case as the ENT has ever seen. Do you have any suggestions for that? I know it is hurting some things in regards to my singing.

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Well, Owen, to be fair to me, google had nothing to do with it. I had found it on youtube before and tried to find it again, with no success. However, that is a result of me being stupid in thinking it would still be on youtube. So, I was an idiot, just not exactly in the way that one might think I was.

Anyway, thanks for finding it and proving my point.

So, what was my point? Voices sometimes crack. Even for the pros, the very voices we might idolize or admire. it's not the end of the world.

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