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Is posture over rated?

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gilad
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Ok, So my question is this. When it comes to posture, how important is it? I mean, yes, I won't sing with my hands way up in the air, while doing some where angles with my body. But if I relatively straight, does it really make a difference whether my knees are locked or bent, my back is arched or not, the head is slightly raised or lowered? I don't feel any difference if I do that, or go precisely as the books are calling for...

Would love some light on the subject.

Thanks

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Posture is important imo but the posture that you hear is the ideal may not work for you. During years I heard I should stay in a certain way and give room and have my feets a certain way and it never felt good at all. I sing much better now sitting down than I ever did in that posture. I've improved in other areas of my voice that certainly makes a difference but that awkward posture still feels awkward. My point is, get the basics down, support, breathing and placement then have the posture where these feel most natural. Imo that is the way to go.

cheers!

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I also have a feeling that breathing is also over rated. Does a singer really need to do breathing exercises or it will come with the vocal work outs anyway?

Forgive me for all my questions, I am just trying to understand what is it I am missing to get a nice vocal chord closure in the higher portion of my voice. Posture, Breathing, maybe something else... Also the fact that I cannot for the love of god do VOCAL FRY puzzles me...

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Its hard to say that breathing is overrated when most humans tend to die without it :-P jokes aside, I would say like with posture. You need the basics, you need to be able to make a relaxed deep breath. Training breathing at least for me is not really like going to the gym to get bigger muscles, I'm more looking for control and making it more and more automatic so I can sing without worrying about loosing support.

cheers!

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People give Bret Manning and SLS a hard time because of not focusing on support. Seth Riggs explains it this way. If you keep a good posture, breath low keep your ribs expanded and sternum up, and do not let too much air over the vocal folds,have good cord closure, you do not have to worry so much about support.

But guess what! All of those things describe support.

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i'll tell you this about support ...did you know this is one of the key ingredients for range? in some instances, as the voice ascends and the folds thin and get pulled or stretched more they require more sound wave pressure.

try it.... go up high with your voice and let off the support..then tell me what happens.

posture is all about alignment and efficiency, so the organs and muscles can work together without obstacles.

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Correct posture puts the body and vocal organs into the best biomechanical alignment. Subtle variations may not be audible to the listener, but they can be felt by the singer. As to whether the singer cares about the differences that result...

That is up to them. :-)

I hope this is helpful.

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To me, not just posture of the whole body, but also alignment of neck and head. I see where some tilt their heads back like a PEZ dispenser. Me, I keep my head level and let my jaw drop. It seems to help with both the stability and mobility of my larynx. But others might have structure that works better with head movement, I don't know.

I just can't get away from seeing the voice as a wind instrument, which requires a certain alignment.

My opinion and $1.70 USD will get you a 16.9 oz Diet Coke.

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At a local music charity workshop thing;

Our lady singer moved on last year but the guys wanted to jam on some lady-jazz type of tunes so I figured I'd sing 'em in head voice for a laugh. For full effect I even adopted a lady-jazz type of posture and I'll be damned if I didnt nearly nail the tune in what sounded like a full voice (in parts at least).

As Steven said - the biggest difference was in body sensations, when the notes rang out the best I felt the difference immediately, probably the closest I've come to feeling my way to notes rather than thinking about 'em (I overthink the overthought by habit, sigh).

Last week I didnt think about posture, now I'm thinking about how I can ring out the high notes without standing like a lady ;)

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At a local music charity workshop thing;

Our lady singer moved on last year but the guys wanted to jam on some lady-jazz type of tunes so I figured I'd sing 'em in head voice for a laugh. For full effect I even adopted a lady-jazz type of posture and I'll be damned if I didnt nearly nail the tune in what sounded like a full voice (in parts at least).

As Steven said - the biggest difference was in body sensations, when the notes rang out the best I felt the difference immediately, probably the closest I've come to feeling my way to notes rather than thinking about 'em (I overthink the overthought by habit, sigh).

Last week I didnt think about posture, now I'm thinking about how I can ring out the high notes without standing like a lady ;)

But the real question is did you wear an evening gown to complete the look?

:)

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I believe posture is a big deal, especially in the very beginning for many singers.

Proper posture is what allows proper support to develop. If the chest is dropped or caved, or the upper abs tensed, or the head out of alignment, many incorrect tensions will automatically make their way into the voice.

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First, I tried the posture of Eve in the Garden but everyone kept laughing.

Then I tried the posture of "The Thinker" by Rodin, but it crashed my breathing.

So, then, I tried the posture of the guy on the Rush album. That worked best.

:D

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