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Vocal fatigue and how to deal with it.

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Jbrink07
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Hey everyone,

I'm pretty worried that I messed my voice up. I was trying to extend my range a few nights back, and I think I was using pretty bad form. I was singing a note that might have been to high for me at the top of my lungs over and over again.. It was stupid and ill never make that mistake again, but I have had vocal fatigue for the past few days where it almost gets tiring to talk. There is very minimal pain when I talk, and there is no hoarseness, so I am wondering if it will just go away in a week or so with rest? Who else has dealt with this, and what did you do? I'm worried that I won't be able to give my vocal cords the rest they need because I am a salesman and need to talk every day. Will my vocal cords be able to rest if I am talking and not singing at all? Thanks a lot

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- Ingo Titze's straw exercise

- Water

- Light humming

- Lip bubbles/trills

- PLENTY of rest

MAYBE some lozenges, get that anesthetic in your system. Numb the pain.

I'm getting less and less fatigue the more I sing, day in, day out. Maybe it's my vocal technique getting better.

Ever since I read Alan greene's book I've felt less tension in my tongue and digastric muscle.

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Hey everyone,

I'm pretty worried that I messed my voice up. I was trying to extend my range a few nights back, and I think I was using pretty bad form. I was singing a note that might have been to high for me at the top of my lungs over and over again.. It was stupid and ill never make that mistake again, but I have had vocal fatigue for the past few days where it almost gets tiring to talk. There is very minimal pain when I talk, and there is no hoarseness, so I am wondering if it will just go away in a week or so with rest? Who else has dealt with this, and what did you do? I'm worried that I won't be able to give my vocal cords the rest they need because I am a salesman and need to talk every day. Will my vocal cords be able to rest if I am talking and not singing at all? Thanks a lot

Speak only when you need to, speak in a volume that is easy for you. Otherwise, rest, hold off on the singing. Give it a couple of weeks. Then, when getting back into singing, don't start singing just yet. Do only warm-ups. Such as light volume descending slides, starting from only the highest comfortable note, even if that is not very high. Do it for only about 10 or 15 minutes at a time, no more than twice a day, maybe morning and evening.

This is what I did after injuring myself, twice because I am an idiot, trying to do "false vocal fold distortion."

After the second time and the second recovery, I also implemented the decision to not do the thing that injured me, ever, again.

So, when you re-approach singing, avoid that which injured you. Ancient chinese secret, some times the best way to avoid injury is to avoid doing that which can injure you.

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jbrinker,

While I agree with ronws and D. Starr, the LAST thing I would do is to use ANY products that would anesthetize, or numb your voice in ANYWAY !!! Doing so could cause you not to feel what you are doing while singing (or speaking excessively), and cause further damage without you even realizing it.....

Most importantly, get as much vocal rest as possible.

Just my two cents for what is it worth....

Regards,

Adolph

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jbrinker - Been there, done that...a bunch of times throughout my life. It will come back, but the length of time varies. The first time I discovered I could actually sing a C5 I sang way too much up there and was out of commission for a couple months. I doubt it will take you that long. Last summer I blew out my voice (inter arytenoids) and it took about 2 weeks to come back. The IR's get fatigued quickly - that could be what you did.

It's best to limit talking, but if that's a part of your job, you have no choice. Just try to limit your voice use when not on the job. While your talking though - make sure you support. Don't whisper or you'll make it worse. Only time can heal it now.

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Singing a lot will tire the voice. Out of commission for months even weeks shows me something was done very wrong. Out of commission for a few days is understandable. In my career it happened a few times. What I learned was lozenges of whatever kind have no direct effect on the vocal cords only placebo. Water is always good. But if you already dehydrated yourself and became horse it takes longer to get back the voice by drinking tons of water though it can't hurt. Steroids like dexamethasone can help with inflammation quickly but you don't need to do that if you can shut your mouth(use a note pad) for 36-72 hours it has the same effect. Been there done that. It's kind of cool to carry a note pad and you begin to realize you probably talk to much and should listen more:)

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- Ingo Titze's straw exercise

- Water

- Light humming

- Lip bubbles/trills

- PLENTY of rest

MAYBE some lozenges, get that anesthetic in your system. Numb the pain.

I'm getting less and less fatigue the more I sing, day in, day out. Maybe it's my vocal technique getting better.

Ever since I read Alan greene's book I've felt less tension in my tongue and digastric muscle.

This is really good advice. Really try to do the straw exercise.

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it you must talk because of your job, try to intersperse light humming, or some lip bubbles, in between speaking periods, like this:

spoke some, knock off a set of lip bubbles, spoke some, lip bubbles....humming...

and just remember...okay, i spoke a bunch, excuse yourself, go outside or wherever and just knock off a few lip bubbles, or a minute or two of humming.

remember to to be cognizant that you don't drop the voice down low when you speak, or speak too much with the throat...try to place it higher and brighter.

spoke some more?...follow up with a set of lip bubbles...no extremes of range!

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it you must talk because of your job, try to intersperse light humming, or some lip bubbles, in between speaking periods, like this:

This ^.

I saw a video of James Lugo recording patches for a vocal track. In between takes, he would lip bubble to stay limber and warm.

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Actually, Robert and Adolph have been gravious to allow this flagrant bit of advertising to happen. Although all systems are welcome to be discussed, it is polite to contact admin about advertising a specific product.

Even I wanted you to try Ron's fabulous smoked brisket, proper etiquette would be to pay for my own banner ad.

But it really is good brisket.

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