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PLEASE HELP: NEW TO SINGING BARRITONE

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I’m 28, and I am a songwriter/guitarist, I want to be a singer (I will be a singer.) For as long as I remember I thought I was a tenor. I could hit the notes but not very well at a higher volume and was very quiet when I would do open mics. So I decided to get some lessons and to my surprise I’ve been doing it all wrong. I had no idea I was a baritone and I was trying to force myself to sing tenor. Does anyone have any advice to work on my baritone singing? I feel as if I have to rewrite some songs and have to learn to sing in that range. I still find myself trying to go too high because of habit but it sounds awful. :D Any advice is appreciated.

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Don't lock yourself into a range just because someone tells you that you are a Bari and not a tenor. With practice and the right teacher, a Bari can sing well into then or range and above. Geoff Tate is a baritone. Roy Khan is a baritone. You get the idea. Try not to think of yourself as a baritone. Once you start limiting yourself, it's a bad habit to break .

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Hey Baritone! Just wanna second Keith's advice by adding my own experience - even though my journey is the reverse of yours in some respects we're learning the same lesson but from different sides.

I used to think I was a low voiced singer and my early investigations into singing technique backed up this impression as many of the older schools seem to use the classical terms to describe the different ranges (fach's is it ?). I honestly believe that for my style of music (alt rock/metal/folk kinda thing) it held me back from discovering the science behind the teaching.

As soon as I started to think of my low pitched voice as one that was naturally aligned / tuned to singing lower notes with the appropriate vowel colours rather than being rooted or stuck there I found my practice started to progress not only faster but also with greater understanding of what I was doing.

EDIT: For clarity - find out why you find the lower notes sound better / easier to sing. The answer will be somewhat unique to you rather than being something you can just read about. Listen out for the harmonic richness of sound and how it changes with pitch and vowel - this handily brings us right back to the point of it all, the words of the songs we sing.

It's an elaborate puzzle at first but stick with it!

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:DThank you for your responses; more than you know it is very helpful and gives me a unique insight. I know you can’t limit yourself to singing in a baritone range but I do find it helpful that I know what my range is and what my limits are until this point in this journey.

This is going to sound silly, but up until recently I never had an interest in learning the science behind singing and music theory. I didn’t even understand that I had a range to begin with. The reason I mention this is because this is all new to me.

I wrote a song in Spanish and when I sing it I feel comfortable because it’s well in my range. Another song I wrote in English is written with a tenor in mind because I wanted to sound like my some of my heroes that happen to be tenors. I didn’t understand there was a difference until now. When I sing in a key that’s at the high end of my range it limits where I can go and I don’t feel as comfortable. I think this is why I sing the Spanish song better, but than again I am new to this.

ENGLISH SONG:

SPANISH SONG: http://youtu.be/8avUBMy1OXQ

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Hmm it might be My ear but arent those Two songs Both around the same range, one being weaker and whispery(english) and the spanish song more supported(more energy).

With that Said, i liked the spanish song alot more, it felt more sincere even though i didnt understand the words :) well done

Dont worry about if your a baritone or tenor, it doesnt matter. Heck you can get so diffrent answears, your money and time is better spent going to a fortuneteller and asking what you are.

During My time ive sung

An extremly skilled logopeadic told me i was a bass

When i started most coaches Said baritone

Now all say tenor

If i continue for 9 more years il bet you il get alto and soprano from someone to... I does not matter, sing what you want to sing, and if you cant do it learn ;)

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Well I claim myself to be a Baritone and the english version is easy enough for me to sing.

Is your native tongue Spanish? Maybe that might be the thing. As crazy as it sounds.

Maybe just a few more singing lessons or working on your voice might help.

Here's my attempt, didn't warm up and bare in mind like I said, I claim myself to be a Baritone.

https://www.box.com/s/zq8msjl6wjkmxm03tc34

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Well I claim myself to be a Baritone and the english version is easy enough for me to sing.

Is your native tongue Spanish? Maybe that might be the thing. As crazy as it sounds.

Maybe just a few more singing lessons or working on your voice might help.

Here's my attempt, didn't warm up and bare in mind like I said, I claim myself to be a Baritone.

https://www.box.com/s/zq8msjl6wjkmxm03tc34

Thanks Jens I appreciate you listening, I think they are about the same range your right.

D. Starr, Wow man, you have a really nice voice & made it sound easy. Thank you for the help I never thought I would ever get someone to sing it in their own way just to help me out. The power of the internet! So yes my first language is Spanish and your right maybe that’s why I have an easier time singing it in that language.

So I know nothing about music theory so bare with me: you’re singing in the same key (hitting the same notes) but what you did was to sing it in three different pitches? Is that right?

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Thanks.

The second one I did felt a lot easier to sing. The higher one felt easy in places, if I'd have warmed up before hand I could have gone higher.

But like you said, all I did was keep going up in pitch. Adding a slight cry which I naturally do when I sing.

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Hey, Baritone, not to lock you into a range but you might benefit from "The Baritone Voice" by Anthony Frisell. I have not read it but I hear it's a good book. I think it costs $10 USD on Kindle.

I think I paid $10 for his other book, "The Tenor Voice."

Anyway, you say you have had some lessons, so you have already followed the popular advice around here to "get a coach."

If your coach thinks you are a baritone and you are comfortable with that, I would stick with that. And there are some baritones who are quite successful. Scott Stapp describes himself as a baritone and he did quite well for himself with Creed.

edited to add:

being baritone does not mean that you will not be able to sing high notes. And perhaps your teacher was not comfortable teaching you to sing high notes. So, like Jens, you may find yourself finding alternate teaching to learn that.

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Hmm it might be My ear but arent those Two songs Both around the same range, one being weaker and whispery(english) and the spanish song more supported(more energy).

With that Said, i liked the spanish song alot more, it felt more sincere even though i didnt understand the words :) well done

Dont worry about if your a baritone or tenor, it doesnt matter. Heck you can get so diffrent answears, your money and time is better spent going to a fortuneteller and asking what you are.

During My time ive sung

An extremly skilled logopeadic told me i was a bass

When i started most coaches Said baritone

Now all say tenor

If i continue for 9 more years il bet you il get alto and soprano from someone to... I does not matter, sing what you want to sing, and if you cant do it learn ;)

I want to second this advice. Especially early on during first lessons with a coach they might say one think, or be uncertain. I though I was a baritone due to the range fitting my untrained voice, but when I started taking voice lessons I was neither a baritone (deep notes) or a tenor (high notes). Voice coaches could have decided on either. Sometimes they still are uncertain. I think that I'm more tenor-material than anything else, but I'm not sure if that is a result of how I've trained and/or my personality, or physiological. Meaning; perhaps at one point I had a choice. Not sure!

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I dislike when teacher classify students too early... most likely the teacher is a fool. "Sing lower" isn't necessarily helping you achieve your dream voice. Things like cord-closure (non-breathiness) and twang will! Regardless of if you are a bass, baritone, tenor, or countertenor. I have found that people with good cord-closure and decent twang ususally lack it on a different part of the range and then limit themselves to what they are good at.

My approach... hit your weakest areas hard... and soft ;) everyday till they are no longer weak.

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I dislike when teacher classify students too early... most likely the teacher is a fool. "Sing lower" isn't necessarily helping you achieve your dream voice. Things like cord-closure (non-breathiness) and twang will! Regardless of if you are a bass, baritone, tenor, or countertenor. I have found that people with good cord-closure and decent twang ususally lack it on a different part of the range and then limit themselves to what they are good at.

My approach... hit your weakest areas hard... and soft ;) everyday till they are no longer weak.

And that, I can totally agree with. And I would say the experience of Jens bears that out.

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I dislike when teacher classify students too early... most likely the teacher is a fool. "Sing lower" isn't necessarily helping you achieve your dream voice. Things like cord-closure (non-breathiness) and twang will! Regardless of if you are a bass, baritone, tenor, or countertenor. I have found that people with good cord-closure and decent twang ususally lack it on a different part of the range and then limit themselves to what they are good at.

My approach... hit your weakest areas hard... and soft ;) everyday till they are no longer weak.

That's great advice, I should of been clear (I'm new to this terminology so bare with me), my vocal coach never said I was a baritone or tenor or anything like that we simply went up and down the scales and she told me my range from low note to high.

I don't see my self stuck a baritone or anything but I do find it helpful to know my limits at the moment. The knowledge of knowing this has been helpful because I didn't even know there was such a thing. As funny as it sounds I didn't even know that you should change a songs key to best suit your voice if it's too high so I was straining a lot. I am a self taught songwriter so I just did not understand the importance of understanding what your doing by using music theory. it's hand in hand. What I mean when I say I was doing it all wrong is that I was trying to sing songs that were out of my range which is doing me no good because what I really need is the basics right now. Doing scales and exercises every day. I have to train my ear first and tie it to the feeling of the notes I want to hit. So she doesn't tell me to "sing lower" she tells me to "sing in your range." I'm going to see her tonight thanks for all the advice everyone this is a work in progress.

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Don't hit notes, sing them.

So, you were the one to think of yourself as baritone, more than others do. You could an example of what I was talking about. An untrained tenor who has not yet bridged.

So, let me say something that will be unpopular ( I am good at that :lol: ).

Tenors use head voice. Anyone, baritone, tenor, whatever, is in head voice by the time they get to, for example, C5. There are standard passaggi to negotiate. It just happens that tenors are closer to the passagio region than the lower voice types. So, learn to bridge, learn to bridge early in your voice, if you are a tenor. Expect it, there it is, here it comes, look out, we're over the river,,, done did it.

Don't make me whip out the story of the guy who was typed as a baritone and just didn't have the ring and depth he needed for the roles in which he was cast. And so he went to another teacher who had him try some different exercises. And it turned out he was a lyric tenor.

Just because may speak around C3 or D3, which is in the baritone range, does not make you a baritone. Your usable range is where you have the greatest dynamic of volume and tone, per Steven Fraser. Whatever that range happens to be. Which is not meant to be a limitation.

And good for you to not place a limit on your voice at this time. Define your goals and then achieve them.

It's just that easy.

:)

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