Jump to content

No head voice sensation

Rate this topic


Willise
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've been practicing for a few months now, and I just cannot seem to get the head voice down. I always go from chest right to falsetto. My teacher, all the videos, comments on this forum, etc talk about the resonant feeling in the head, across the nose area when in head voice. I don't feel that at all - ever! LOL

I have been practicing the sirens, NAY, MUM, GOOG, twang, lift up-pull back - but I cannot seem to get that feeling. I go to a D4-E4 in chest, then flip right into a breathy F4. I can play virtually any instrument that I pick up, but this has been so frustrating! LOL

I have never even been able to yell "WOO HOO" without it sounding windy. Are there any tricks to getting this head voice feeling? I know the voice is actually resonating in the throat, so maybe I am misunderstanding the whole head voice sensation that I keep reading about.

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

will, any time you go from a chest voice production into (i'm assuming) a breathy falsetto you have a disconnection.

you aren't holding on.......basically the vocal folds aren't doing two things .....staying sufficiently closed and stretching for the pitch. no adducted folds, little to no sound.

there is no trick..no magic wand.....and there many reasons or a combination of reasons why this could be is happening.

without hearing you, it's hard to suggest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your "chest voice" has nothing solid to bridge into. Imagine you are running 100m and after the first 50m the track has a bunch of holes in it. It would be very difficult to finish the race.

What is helping me is the concept that the voice is carved with a LASER not a hammer. You physically can't take the heavyness and power of your speaking voice up UNTIL you have that other half of the track completely dependable and solid. Meaning until your falsetto is strong and dependable enough for you to rely on then you will have trouble bridging & connecting.

If you don't have pillars... get it... work on twanging in the falsetto register and all the foundation building exercises with a particular emphasis on your weak areas.

Don't be afraid to get specific towards your weaknesses. Play offense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been practicing for a few months now, and I just cannot seem to get the head voice down. I always go from chest right to falsetto. My teacher, all the videos, comments on this forum, etc talk about the resonant feeling in the head, across the nose area when in head voice. I don't feel that at all - ever! LOL

Hi, Willise. While these sensations are subjective, and somewhat individual, there is a strong correllation between them (when they appear) and the physical characteristics of the tone being produced. Strong sensations result from the harmonic strength.

Some of your situation may be that you are not attuned to the sensations. If that is the case, here is a very simple thing you can do to get started on that:

Place the palm of your hand gently on your forehead, so that your palm and fingers are all lightly touching skin.

In your middle voice, at the most comfortable pitch level, onset and firmly sustain the voiced consonant 'TH', as in the beginning sound in the English word 'THEE'.

Extend your awareness to the sensations felt in the palm and fingers of the forehead hand. With them, you should be able to sense the vibration in your forehead. Repeat this 10 times, with your hand on different parts of your head... crown, high upper neck, sides, nose bridge, cheek bones.

THere will be some variation location to location. Perfectly to be expected.

Try this out, and let us know what you sense. When I see your reply, I will tell you the next thing to do in the progression of exercises.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Steven,

I tried the exercise you mentioned. First of all, I found it hard to get to a middle type voice by just voicing the consonant without a vowel. But I think I finally got the hang of it. I was able to get sensations in the neck, cheek bones, and cheek area. There was no feeling above the cheek bone.

I have been trying the quack vocal onset - voicing falsetto, closing the mouth, then re-enunciating the vowel. But I believe I keep going to falsetto. I hope that makes sense!:)

Thanks again for your help! I will try to get an MP3 to illustrate to you what I'm talking about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi willise, plenty of advice and things to try in this thread, but I thought I'd chime in with something else you can try, which is what worked for me when I was in your situation. I don't like to think of head voice as being a different thing that you need to switch to, rather, when you do sing high, that's just where it will resonate naturally, and if you can't "feel" it, don't worry.

Starting with a comfortable mid range, mid volume note on UH (like AH but less open). Then go up in pitch a bit. Once you start feeling a little like it's not quite right but the note is still doable, experiment with different amounts of air flow (called "support"). You may need more or less air than you currently use, it depends on what your current habit is. Also the volume will increase a bit as you go higher, that's ok (it can be fairly loud, just not yelling). You may find that with a bit more or less air the note feels much more comfortable. Then you can try going up in pitch again.

I'm not an expert as much as most of the guys here, but I'd be interested to know if this helps at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi willise, plenty of advice and things to try in this thread, but I thought I'd chime in with something else you can try, which is what worked for me when I was in your situation. I don't like to think of head voice as being a different thing that you need to switch to, rather, when you do sing high, that's just where it will resonate naturally, and if you can't "feel" it, don't worry.

Starting with a comfortable mid range, mid volume note on UH (like AH but less open). Then go up in pitch a bit. Once you start feeling a little like it's not quite right but the note is still doable, experiment with different amounts of air flow (called "support"). You may need more or less air than you currently use, it depends on what your current habit is. Also the volume will increase a bit as you go higher, that's ok (it can be fairly loud, just not yelling). You may find that with a bit more or less air the note feels much more comfortable. Then you can try going up in pitch again.

I'm not an expert as much as most of the guys here, but I'd be interested to know if this helps at all.

Thanks for the advice. I tried what you suggested and I can get a solid F4-G4 , but as soon as I go higher, I lose the connection. Maybe my problem is that I don't know how to control my breathing? I try to pull pack on the air, but when I put my hand in front of my mouth, I can definitely feel that I am blowing air. So that leads me to believe that I am not able to keep the cords closed. I'll keep trying my workouts and see if I can correct this, because I feel that once I can get this head voice thing, I can really take off. :)

Thanks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice. I tried what you suggested and I can get a solid F4-G4 , but as soon as I go higher, I lose the connection. Maybe my problem is that I don't know how to control my breathing? I try to pull pack on the air, but when I put my hand in front of my mouth, I can definitely feel that I am blowing air. So that leads me to believe that I am not able to keep the cords closed. I'll keep trying my workouts and see if I can correct this, because I feel that once I can get this head voice thing, I can really take off. :)

Thanks!!

Willise: Remember that the ability of the vocal bands to close depends in part about how hard the exhalation force is. If you are blowing too hard at the F&G4, the transition to above that will be more difficult.

Here is a simple exercise you can do to help learn the sensations of the held-back breath: Lay on your back on the floor, with a pillow beneath your head, and a medium-weight book on your belly, where your bellybutton is. Siren up from middle A3 to the E4, and think about keeping the book up. Go nice and slow. The height of the book will show you immediately if you are letting go of your breath management. Transpose up by semitones.

I hope this is helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...