Jump to content

Training Speaking Voice

Rate this topic


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey all, this seems totally random and unrelated to singing. But I feel fortunate that I noticed early on that if my actual speaking voice is breathy, or over-compressed, or too low.... it totally ruins my plans. Meaning if my speaking voice is not FLEXIBLE or in-efficient then it translates directly into my singing.

What are some things I can do to make sure my speaking voice is efficient and flexible? And how do I make sure I don't fall into bad habits like breathiness, over-compression, bad-placement, and so on when I have to talk to people :lol:

Btw I noticed if I can successfully do a descending slide and "keep" that placement in my speaking voice, bridging & connecting is so much easier. This is why I feel it is mandatory for me to not just include but put extra focus on the flexibility and ease-of-production of my speaking voice.

Thanks in advance!

- JayMC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

after my polyp healed.....i had to learn a totally different way (and keep reminding myself all the time) to speak jay. it is so,so, important....

i still think my speaking voice and the loud talking i used to do here in my store caused the problem.

here are some tips:

keep the voice out of the throat...be cognizant every time you open your mouth, support your speaking voice and send (place) the voice higher....in the direction of an "ng."

lip bubble or hum after any long speaking session, even a long winded conversation. avoid loud speaking. that can actually be more detrimental than yelling. try to change up the pitch..don't talk in a monotone way.

watch the ends of sentences..don't drop the volume and grind down like a "sylvester stalone" kind of thing.

and above all..... drink water, every single day......at least a 1/2 gallon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Believe me videohere... after having an open-dialog with my voice... it said "what are you doing!!! take care of me!!" Things are becoming more clear. Thank you for your advice, I really do appreciate it. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

glad to help. all the doctors could say to me was "you need surgery" and i spoke to my voice and told it to heal.

just be cognizant of abuse. let's say you're just hanging around doing nothing...knock off a set of hums or 'ng" or lip bubbles, or the straw...

i keep a box of straws in the car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The singing voice encompasses the speaking voice. It's a perspective thingy, and kind of a mechanical thingy. Learn how to sing. Let that inform how you speak. At least half of the struggle to sing is to overcome and move away from how you speak. If you tend to speak in fry and try to sound low that you can be manly, you are detuning your organ.

Instead, say the word "hello" and hold the note on the o. That is the natural speaking pitch of your voice, which is a usually a little bit higher than you thought. I got this from Roger Love. Anyway, it takes discipline and some vigilance, early on, to learn how to quit detuning your voice.

You are a singer, live like one. Speak like one. So many people want to talk about the singing and speaking voice being the same. Well, by golly, live like it, instead of paying lip service.

Caution, allowing your voice to float to where it is supposed to be might get you labeled as lazy and earn you sideways barbs like "well, since you describe yourself as a tenor" and etc.

Sound familiar?

Change your mind, the hardest thing you will ever do. The speaking voice is a smaller and less expansive function of the singing voice. Quit fighting yourself. Unless you just really like fighting yourself and everything needs to be a herculean struggle. Can't help you on that, if that's your thing.

Good luck and may the Force be with you, always.'

"These are not the droids you are looking for."

"Oh, crap, those WERE the droids I was looking for."

Sorry, got side-tracked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey all, this seems totally random and unrelated to singing.

not at all! it is 100% related to singing. I actually had a speech therapy session today for some vocal issues and i can tell you they both overlap. In my case, my singing has actually effected my speaking voice.

One particular thing i have noticed with my own voice and i believe can be a common problem with men's voices in particular is trying to speak too low. I think it's supposed to stem from the premise that a low, deep voice is manly and strong, consciously or unconsciously, which i can relate to as my voice is quite high. When I roughly pitched my speaking voice, I was talking around B2 and to put that into context, B2 is the lowest note I can sing, but comfortably I would not usually go below C#3. So I was actually speaking on a note that I can't comfortably sing without even knowing it!

Concerning your question about placement, I was recommended to very gently clear my throat to "reset" the larynx position and then try speaking again. When I did, my pitch was a few steps higher, i could feel it much stronger in my mask and it was much easier.

The problem is, as careful as we are in our singing practice; we are not always as careful in out general speech and given that we talk far more frequently than we sing, it can almost be a silent killer that creeps into your singing habits!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One particular thing i have noticed with my own voice and i believe can be a common problem with men's voices in particular is trying to speak too low. I think it's supposed to stem from the premise that a low, deep voice is manly and strong, consciously or unconsciously, which i can relate to as my voice is quite high. When I roughly pitched my speaking voice, I was talking around B2 and to put that into context, B2 is the lowest note I can sing, but comfortably I would not usually go below C#3. So I was actually speaking on a note that I can't comfortably sing without even knowing it!

Thank you so much for posting your experience. I talk about it and I think people chalk it up to Ron being lazy, not doing enough with his voice, not working at the low end long enough, being lazy in accepting his limitations.

In fact it was others here who told me I was not doing enough with my voice that turned me on to Roger Love. But conveniently forget that little tuning trick of letting your voice do what it does naturally.

I should probably shut up now but bravo, MB20. Join me on the highway to Hell. I've got a cooler of cold ones in the back seat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can understand if you've got someone who's trying to speak loud and all they're doing is getting breathier - those kind of people may need to approach it as technically as CVT explains, but I think it confuses the average population to mention all these details need to happen a specific way when in reality they've been doing it right all along. Most people naturally add more "metal" the louder they speak. Ever been in a class with your ears right near the teacher trying to project to the back of the room and be heard over all the students having conversation? It almost always sounds painfully metallic and they didn't have to read the CVT book and understand vocal modes to do that.

I personally think everything someone needs to know about speaking healthy should be able to be explained almost entirely in terminology that the average person would understand...CVT just likes to be fancy and use esoteric terminology...fine by me, whatever sells their product.

Your out on deep water, the language what sets products like cvt and pillars apart from Old terms.

Teachers get speakingvoice training, they dont do this naturaly. Teachers are the mst frequent visitors to the ent

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends on what you want.

Trainning a bit of support and forward placement should allow comfort, for most of the tasks. If you are an actor, then yes, a bit more of intensity is needed, a more refined trainning involving relaxation and repositioning of the voice, including a warmup routine to be followed is necessary.

The result will gravitate towards the "overdrive mode" yes, partial chest voice :rolleyes:, but hardly you have to be concerned with this if the trainning is done properly.

A teacher could help you with this in a few sessions, easily.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...