Jump to content

Bridging early/Late

Rate this topic


gilad
 Share

Recommended Posts

Another one of my many issues...

How the heck can I control where I bridge? I mean, when I sing, the passagio happens at a certain spot. I dont think I have any control on whether to move it higher or lower. I read that the higher I bridge, the thicker I can get my high notes. Maybe I am bridging too early?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 88
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Wow Owen!!!

Thank you so much for your detailed answer. I really appreciate ite.

It makes a lot of sense. I was never told any of the remarks you were talking about, but I do think my voice is a bit thin up there where I wish I could make it thicker. That being said, you put me in the right track by saying that if I starting changing where I bridge, I will ruin something that was working for me.

Nuff said.. I am letting bridging early/late goo... :cool:

Thanks again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what if i simply said, pretend there is no bridge....nothing to "go into."

would you perceive this as more or less difficult?

owen, when you have selected the right vowel to go up with, you will not pull chest...you can't. the correct vowel prohibits you from pulling chest. that's the key to the thick sound up top, the vowel shade, and the support.

don't be afraid of "pulling chest" or hanging on to more t/a musculature because you may end up undertraining in some cases. chest voice musculature is like a launch pad to the higher ranges.

i wanted to jump in and say that sometimes you guys assign a negative connotation to "pulling up chest" which is not always true. depends on how strong or developed you are, and how you approach it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just listened to the song in your signature again. It sounded very good. Yes I could tell when and where you "Bridged" But I also feel that for that song it added to the feel. You already get in and out of head voice without any major difference in sound. Worrying about when and where to bridge may cause more problems than it will solve. Plus the fact that different songs have different dynamics and that will change when, where. and how we bridge or if we have to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's someone who bridges fairly early.

Can you tell where the bridging is?

https://thevocaliststudio.box.com/s/ebf8ef7460f93ccbeca8]

edited to add:

looks like the link is gone.

It was Robert Lunte doing "Child in Time."

I guess my cover is the last one standing. But I didn't think about bridging when I was doing it, so that won't help much as an example.

Although Robert did compliment my falsetto.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

gilad - as I think your bridging is perfect already one thing you could try is what tamplin calls glottal compression. This is where you sing with the sensation of holding your breath (sounds weird - I know) but it works. That will increase your closed quotient which will produce louder overtones - the result is a "chestier" more metallic sound. (Basically the same as keeping your TA more active)

Another way to achieve the same result is to go farther in chest before going into head which is tamplin's description.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Besides being trainned and defined at a place, there is nothing to worry about. Should not compromise power, it actually allows a lot of power.

Belting is not the answer if head registration is not working as you want. Its vocal suicide to rely on it because of a problem on head registration.

Keep the passagio spot at the same place. Support and resonance are the sources of problems related to the quality of production.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what if i simply said, pretend there is no bridge....nothing to "go into."

would you perceive this as more or less difficult?

owen, when you have selected the right vowel to go up with, you will not pull chest...you can't. the correct vowel prohibits you from pulling chest. that's the key to the thick sound up top, the vowel shade, and the support.

don't be afraid of "pulling chest" or hanging on to more t/a musculature because you may end up undertraining in some cases. chest voice musculature is like a launch pad to the higher ranges.

i wanted to jump in and say that sometimes you guys assign a negative connotation to "pulling up chest" which is not always true. depends on how strong or developed you are, and how you approach it...

First of all: hello everyone, this is my first post here. :)

This is interesting... I've been meaning to ask something similar, but not gotten to it yet. I've been going to a (classically trained) vocal coach, and she never acknowledged anything like a bridge, head voice, chest voice or anything.

I'm a bass/baritone, and she had me doing different arpeggios and working on tension to increase my range. The last piece I did was in a tenor tessitura (Tamino's intro from The Magic Flute) and goes up to Ab4 with a lot of G4:s as well. I can do it, but I have to go really loud, use tons of energy, and the high notes are sort of yell:ish/screamy. My interpretation of this is that I'm "pulling chest" all the way.

How would I go about developing this into a more usable head voice that doesn't sound so shouty? Just abandon this strategy and start practicing "bridge early", or keep doing exercises in "full voice" and trying to increase the range further in the same way? My coach has just moved to another city, so I'm unfortunately on my own for now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there. Classical singing without head registration and covering does not exist. This idea of working on tension MAY be a part of the trainning to develop you strenght and support, but you should know what you were doing and why. Depending on what kind of tension of course.

What are your goals? Do you want to sing classical music, or pop?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thing is, I sing with a male voice choir (1st bass or baritone), and my original motivation for getting a voice teacher was to function better in the choir. I was straining a lot in the higher parts of the tessitura (C4-D4) and could barely manage any higher notes. By taking some lessons on and off and basically just singing more, I've started to manage those problems, and the last time I started taking lessons (six months ago), I wanted to focus more on pop singing, with the goal of being able to sing pop and rock songs without straining or popping into falsetto on the high notes. A kind of ultimate "reach the sky" goal would be to sing Dream Theater and Iron Maiden songs. :)

But to answer your question, I think that I've gotten to a point where I don't need to practice specifically to do the classical parts required by the choir, so what I'm aiming for with my training now is pop/rock.

When I wrote about working on tension I meant removing "bad" tension, in the jaws, neck and back of the tongue. Up until now I think that has been my biggest issue, and learning to relax more has really helped my upper range, but I'm a bit afraid that using that upper range (around F4-A4) in this very chesty/shouty way is not good in the long run (as Owen indicated).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, now it makes sense. Yes, before removing these tensions, a classical teacher will not get even near registration.

Classical technique can easily be applied to sing pop, but the musical language used on arias is way different compared to the language used in pop. So, if you want to continue with another classical teacher, and that is something wise since you already began the work, you need to direct the application into the repertoire you want to sing. So if its rock, heavy metal, thats what you must sing.

If not, you will end up sounding like those participations of Pavarotti on pop material :). Lovely, but it is not the goal.

Ive been working in this path for quite a while, send me an email if you want to chat about it.

GL!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

owen,

if you are going to explain the difference between chest voice and chest resonance to one who uses a one voice technique, you're going to have a hard time of it....lol!!!

i'll take you up on your challenge:

send over a file where you pull chest using an "aw" (as in "hawk") vowel sound on any simple scale.

that's what those narrow vowels accomplish. as ken tamplin says, they are release valves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes, but if you go up the scale with a narrow "aw" it blends beautifully.

nothing gets pulled...

i'm trying to get the folks here to not be so hung up about chest pulling, but rather to learn the right vowel to difuse it.

do you agree? maybe you don't, and that's cool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes, but if you go up the scale with a narrow "aw" it blends beautifully.

nothing gets pulled...

i'm trying to get the folks here to not be so hung up about chest pulling, but rather to learn the right vowel to difuse it.

do you agree? maybe you don't, and that's cool.

I still get hung up on AW :'(

I need to get rid of this pull that's all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bob, a question on the "Aw" chest pull challenge. "Aw" like "hawk" ... so kind of like "o" of "ordinary" ? I'm an Auzzie and I'm just being sure of the accent. "Aw" sounds like somewhere between "o" from "log" and "oo" from "book"...?

I study with Tamplin's method also, so this is making sense to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nick - Tampling explains and demonstrates the vowel modifications very well. The exact shading of the vowel is so hard to describe in text. It is optimum to actually hear it like in Tamplin's video's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nick - Tampling explains and demonstrates the vowel modifications very well. The exact shading of the vowel is so hard to describe in text. It is optimum to actually hear it like in Tamplin's video's.

Hey Geno,

Thanks for the reply. Is it a level 3 thing? or does Bob mean the "Aw" vowel like Tamplin says "It's the Law" I've been working on level 2.... and am very confident with Ah (Aw?) > O > OO > U transitions, both in building chest, and bridging (I know those aren't the IPA correct designations... but you get me).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nick - I think what Bob is talking about is narrowing the vowel, but I'll let him respond. Sounds like you're already doing the vowel mods comfortably. I think all the vowel mod stuff is level 1 for tamplin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

owen, i'm not out get you, but i asked for an "aw."

frisell taught me that "aw" is unique because it's sound and throat shape really brings out resonance and helps unify the voice. but the key, like geno said, is to really hear and produce the proper sound.

i looked around on youtube and came across this guy that pretty much gets my point across.

now it's a long video but you can get a better idea of what i'm trying to convey. watch it in it's entirety.

one thing about me, i will not post anything on this forum without making sure i can back up my point. i'm not a voice teacher, but i study a lot....maybe too much..lol!!!!!

i would never want to post incorrect information.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

listen again. you were singing an "ah." a very subtle shade can make a big difference in the quality of the sound.

okay, add a little more "oh" and open the throat, breath low to drop the larynx and imagine the palate are your vocal folds.

regionalisms and vernacular can make it hard to convey the sound.

try it again. the important point i'm trying to get across here is when you narrow a vowel correctly, and support well with an open throat you cannot pull up chest in the negative way you can when you widen and splat.

i wasn't initially, but i have been sold on the one register way of approaching the voice. i hold on to t/a activity (varying degrees) nearly all of the time.

as i've said before, it's not for everybody. it's just another way to do things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...