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Vocal Cord Adduction

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gilad
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Today, I found one of my old recorded vocal training session (SLS) from Los Angeles. I listen to it, and noticed one of the things that the coach said which I wanted to bring up, as it sounds like it might fix a major problem of mine.

I have a problem with vocal cord closure. In my high notes, i have a breathy tone. During the session, he started telling me to add more air pressure, which will cause it to be higher in volume too. He said that with time, the muscles will get used to adducting the cords the right way, and then i will be able to lower the volume, and air pressure, and the cords would still be adducted. He had me sing staccato "Ah" as in cat, doing a scale. He said it will cause my cords to adduct along with the higher air pressure.

Does this seem right? I did try it now just for kicks, and what do you know, when i get to the high notes, the tone comes out clear with no breathiness. The problem is, I read somewhere that this can lead to vocal problems if using too much air pressure.

What is your take about this?

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gilad its not possible to say without seeing and hearing what you are doing as an exercise.

Stacatto is not easy to do correctly, and well, pop does not give you many opportunities to use it, so it will have to evolve into another exercise on legatto later.

Why dont you keep the idea in your mind, add a few others, and get a session with a teacher to see what is the problem.

It may be enough, it may be too much and it may actually be too little. I had a similar problem and the final solution was actually thinking of pressing with the larynx, but only after trying just about everything else for no result, and then, of course, backing of and finding ballance.

Medial compression is not the only reason why airyness may happen. If you compensate with it, it surelly will not be airy anymore, but usually the reason is related to resonance and support.

Does not ring as a good idea to me, at the same time, you complain on the other thread of a bit of discomfort. It may be a case of actually releasing a tension, not adding. It must be explored first. And yeah, it may be the solution too and it may eliminate both problems.

Going with "mays" is the problem, you need to be sure.

Whatever you decide, keep comfort in mind.

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That's totally correct. This is what tamplin refers to as "glottil compression". You need less air to make the sound. It's a similar concept to covering the end of a garden hose with your thumb - you constrict the opening and the water squirts out much faster and more powerfully.

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Thanks gentleman.,

I must emphasize that the discomfort in my forehead has nothing to do with the breathy tone. The discomfort happens usually when i do exercises that reach C5 - G5 which is my high range. It is easy easy up to F5, but even it being easy, i get this discomfort up there.

If I reduce air pressure and I mean slowly slowly but way back, there comes a point that it goes from tone to airy. Therefore I don't think I need less air to make the sound, and why what my vocal coach said sounds right. THat being said, I am afraid to cause damage. That is why I am bringing this up.

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Rach is correct.

And thats part of my fears on trying to tamper around with emission without a very good reason and a solid plan.

Stacatto done wrong will simply create strong glottal attacks that will just unballance the coordination. Done correctly you feel your voice beginning RIGHT on the place, with no sensation of a strong attack or air passing through, its a huge support work and requires agility. Not my first idea to solve a problem of this nature.

As you go higher, you need more energy, but you must keep air flow under control and appropriate. If you just start to hold back the air, you will enter in fry or brake.

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You need less air but not less air pressure.

Hmm.. Less air but not pressure. So, how do I regulate the exact amount of air? Pressure is obviously by the diagraphm, and that is most definitely what i am adding and reducing.. If I take a very shallow breath, or no breath at all, i can still create the same pressure as with a lot of air. that is why this is confusing.

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Hmm it's easy up to f5, to me it sounds like an issue with the vocalflageolet. Are you happy with the sounds you do up to f5 or are they "under construction" so to speak?

Many highmetal tenors run into à similar problem, sometimes they loose the vocalflageolett sensation on the highnotes and the voice just stops around f5 when they are used to have around 3-4 notes more to stretch.

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You need less air but not less air pressure.

exactly,

also gilad, don't confuse this with the amount of air as in the degree of inhaled air..when we say "less air" it means less air coming through the folds.

but if you don't have the requisite air pressure, you may simply not produce the note well enough.

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rachsing i agree totally.

uncontrolled air velocity causes issues....the key is the pressure, not the velocity.

Once again, Bob, I find myself in agreement with you, at least from this perspective.

Support is the key. It takes the strain of the throat. And, it leads to better tuning, as Justin has been saying. Rather than just forcing air into various passages and places, engage the support and the note can get to its rightful place, resulting in a beautiful tone.

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