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How to compress voice without constricting?

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nariza77
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So my question is, how do you compress voice with a neutral larynx?

You know how some (including me) raise the larynx to constrict the throat and make a higher sound? I understand that it is not the correct way to sing, but how do I sing higher or go up in scale with a lower larynx?

I have tried the breathing exercises( "sss" sound ) and found that if I raise my larynx a little (kind of like nasally), there is not much tension and air flows with my diaphragm. When I try to just sing "ahh" in my monotone, low larynx state, I cannot find a way to compress it. I have tried singing with little air flow, but that just comes out without resonance/control and it sounds monotone. I have seen that example where the guy holds two pieces of paper and blows in between them to make them come together. I am not sure if my vocal folds do that. I dont want to end up pushing air out either.

What are some ways to find the compression in low larynx state?

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you can get a start by learning to add cry to the voice. research it on the forum or youtube.

imitating a baby crying is a great way to feel support, (can't cry without it) and it will help strenghthen the arytenoid muscles, (over time) the primary ones that assist with fold adduction.

send over a sample and we'll tell you if you're on the right track.

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from what i had learned from dave brooks and karyn o'connor, basically, the transverse arytenoids are the muscles that help close the back of the folds.

taken from "singwise.com"...

The transverse arytenoid muscle is a single muscle that arises from the posterior surface and lateral border of one arytenoid cartilage and is inserted into the corresponding parts of the opposite (arytenoid) cartilage, and fills up the posterior concave surfaces of the arytenoid cartilages. The transverse arytenoid muscle pulls the arytenoids toward each other when they contract, which results in adducted vocal folds. This action closes the rima glottides (the opening of the glottis), especially at its back part, to eliminate the posterior commissure - the point, angle, or surface where two parts join or connect - of the vocal folds.

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from what i had learned from dave brooks and karyn o'connor, basically, the transverse arytenoids are the muscles that help close the back of the folds.

taken from "singwise.com"...

The transverse arytenoid muscle is a single muscle that arises from the posterior surface and lateral border of one arytenoid cartilage and is inserted into the corresponding parts of the opposite (arytenoid) cartilage, and fills up the posterior concave surfaces of the arytenoid cartilages. The transverse arytenoid muscle pulls the arytenoids toward each other when they contract, which results in adducted vocal folds. This action closes the rima glottides (the opening of the glottis), especially at its back part, to eliminate the posterior commissure - the point, angle, or surface where two parts join or connect - of the vocal folds.

there's a lot more to study, i'm sure.

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This is just an uneducated guess so someone will most likely correct me. Cry will help tilt the larynx, Stretching the cords.Twang is also involved in cry.

Twang is narrowing the Ary-epiglottic sphincster.

I don't really want to bring back a sad memory for you but, think back to the last time you were actually crying and trying to talk. you almost had to fight yourself to keep from using a high pitch when you talked.

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I see, but where did it show that the "arytenoid muscles" are the primary adductors?

my understanding was that they were the muscles most involved with bringing the folds together. if i need to be corrected, please (anyone) feel free to chime in.

i don't like to go too scientific and technical...i'm more of a touchy feeley type..lol!!!!

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Crying is not really a twang excercise in my opinion. While crying is an action that also includes twang, it doesn't traing twang-control, it is more about using TA muscles and air pressure (bernoulli effect) to close the folds.

When you want to sing with lower mass for example or softer you will have to use more twang and less TA activity to close the folds. So I would also doubt that the arytenoid muscles are the primary adductors. Which muscles can be considered the primary ones depends on the coordination you want to use. For crying maybe the arytenoids are the primary adductors but I really doubt it holds true in general.

To come back to the topic: Personally, I consider quack mode to be a great way to learn the twang. Which means: Don't try to learn twang in a low larynx position. Learn it in a higher position first and THEN learn to lower the larynx while clinging onto the compression. It is way easier in my opinion.

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twang and crying can definitely overlap.

twang does not have to be nasal. in fact, it can produce a serious ring in the voice. depends on how much cry you employ.

Yes, they definitely do, especially if you go as 'baby-like' as you can in your crying. All crying includes twang. I'm just saying that (at least for me) it's harder to learn to control the twanger from crying because you have all those other things active as well (like support and TA). Quack mode gives me a better feeling, which part of the cord closure is actually twang, where it "sits" and how it feels.

Especially when you want to sing a low-mass coordination it is really important that you are able to twang without inducing the breath pressure that crying has in addition to the twang.

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i totally agree benny. it's all about the sound you're going for.

we sometimes forget that each one of us are after a certain sound or sounds......i like the sound of the cry in the voice more than the twang on certain songs.

for example, if i'm doing a country tune, i'll drop out the cry and head up top and get more twangyness. but if i'm doing an old motown tune, more towards t/a with a cry......those guys had a lot of cry in their tone.

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Hey guys, here's a really good video showing you inside the vocal tract exactly what happens during twang

You will see that the twang sound occurs when the aryepiglottic muscle narrows the epiglottis.

People get confused with twang and nasality. A nasal sound occurs from the position of the soft palate (down for nasal sound).

Crying refers to the tilt of the thyroid cartilage. A human function we do to convey our emotions to others.

Happy singing!

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