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what does changing pitch without moving larynx feel like to you guys?

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nariza77
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So far I am working on breathing support, but ive realized that my larynx ascends/descends when I make any kind of sound. The only way to make it not move is to push it down when I start phonation, but there is still some tension there. Even my "Ah" / "Ha" starts off with tension when I try to make it soft/use less air.

Someone on another forum mentioned that changing pitch should be independent of larynx rising/falling or something. Is that true?

If so,

For those who are able to sing and change pitch with this non-moving/ neutral larynx, can you describe what that feeling is like in the throat/neck area? I like to play around with the larynx/diaphragm control, so I wanted to have an idea what correct singing feels like. I seem to always find a new incorrect way of singing that I think is right at first until I record myself or feel the larynx fatigue a few days later.

I am trying to learn the consistent airflow exhale with the diaphragm, but my larynx just seems to always go up/down. It just doesnt make sense how I can change pitch / phonate without larynx ascending/descending. Or should I mainly feel something around the diaphragm area besides the muscles that tense up to hold back from collapsing instead of feeling something in the neck area.

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Man what you need is comfort and quality, these two things. Try to focus on vowel sound instead of a quality like "bright" or "dark", and if the larynx is rising, DONT manipulate it, go more in the direction of OH or a yawn. Just a bit, dont stuck it down in your lungs \o/.

If your larynx is comming way too high, you will start to sound like a squirell and it will not be comfortable, the larynx should and will move during a free and natural production. What happens is that as you improve and reduce the effort, the movement gets smaller, but not because of you forcing it to hold in place.

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ah alright

What if uh, let's say I am trying to sustain an "ah" sound and then I want to make it go higher by a little bit. What do you guys feel when you sing a bit higher in that sense? Like do you feel movement/tension in only the stomach area or if its like some pressure in the abdomen. Any description helps.

My "ah" seems to only go higher if I move my larynx(i think it moves too much). How else can I make it sound higher? It seems like I cant do scales since all I do is "ah" and then move the larynx to change it.

Oh, is the larynx supposed to feel like how it feels when you do lip/tongue trills? Like if I sing a scale while doing the lip trills, that's how the larynx should feel?

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Why not try an experiment? Go to a mirror where you can see your entire throat and jaw. Place your finger on your Adams apple (larynx). Yawn. Notice how low it can attain and feel its sensations. For me, the lower throat muscles are tightened .

Now, sing high a bit, and notice how high the larynx can go-- in my case, over 1 inch.

To keep the larynx down means, while singing, try keep it down with 1/3" of one's low Yawn position (or do one's best to keep it low). One should feel the similar throat sensations as in first paragraph.

Alan Greene's book "The New Voice" teaches this well, and that's where I learned the above exercises and modified it a bit.

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nariza77: There are some tricks so keep the larynx low. Jawning helps raising the soft palate with helps keep larynx down. So sometimes it feels like something is raising in the back of the mouth when I raise pitch without raising larynx.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you guys for the reply. I'm pretty much stuck on the monotone ah and I cannot make it go higher or lower without pushing/pulling larynx. I will do some more experiments with focus on the stomach/abs

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