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Vowels Adduction

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Hey everyone, what vowels have really helped you get that feeling of closure or solidity in your tone?

Eventually I hope to achieve the "one-vowel" feeling and as I am getting there it is more and more obvious that certain vowels are better for achieving glottal closure.

What vowels do you feel help you in achieving closure throughout the voice?

Keep in mind this is totally personal so if you believe the 'i' vowel helped you get better adduction in head voice then feel free to say so!

- JayMC

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"ee" is the best on a technical level. It technically creates the most adduction out of all the vowels. Except it sounds like crap a lot of the time.

So ih or eh are good alternatives.

Owen Korzec: What leads you to think this? I'd be interested to understand the basis.

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Steven the EE vowel if I can get enough "BUZZ" in head voice I have no break lol.... same thing with 'EY' as in hey. What vowel combination would help solidify my mix if this case? The ee feels "closed" at times and not great for singing.

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Owen Korzec: What leads you to think this? I'd be interested to understand the basis.

You would agree that ee is the best vowel to increase adduction right? It has a really high 2nd formant which encourages greater adduction (if i'm not mistaken), i think it naturally takes the larynx up the highest, it's what ent's have you phonate to get a good view of how your folds are adducting, etc. And mostly just from my experience as a singer, I knew ee is the easiest vowel to squeeze the heck out of. Ae as in "cat" is pretty close too, maybe the two are tied...but all the other vowels I've found relatively harder to get adduction on.

Why I say "ee" sounds like crap is obviously personal opinion (and by the way, sometimes it's a great sounding vowel - depends on the context) is because it lacks midrange frequencies. On high notes, the best you can do with it formant-wise without modifying it much is to combine an F1/H1 "hooty" sounding tuning with a cluster of formants amplifying around the singer's formant region. Because the potential to amplify the harmonics in the 500-1500hz region is just not there, the tone of the vowel leaves more to be desired in certain situations.

Don't get me wrong, a well-executed "ee" is one of the most beautiful sounds the human voice can make...but again, it depends on the voice, the context, the pitch, the specific vowel shade, etc. It's a harder vowel to make sound good, if that makes sense.

Ih and eh are pretty close to "ee" on the IPA chart so that's why I recommend them next. And they are front vowels which I think is the key to the good adduction.

Ih and eh are often more stylistically preferred than ee because they are louder and have more midrange content. They generally sound fuller (for lack of better word) than ee. With ee you run the risk of sounding too thin.

This is a lot about opinion, I'm not saying I'm right about any of this.

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No rach, definitely 2nd formant. I saw a study where they determined a higher f2 was correlated with greater addiction.

The thing about ee being used for best adduction is a thing I've heard several different vocal teachers say and they relate it to why ents chose ee. Perhaps they are wrong.

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That sounds interesting. Do you happen to have a link to that study? I'm only aware of one study and the results were inconclusive.

I'm pretty sure in regards to the reason why ENT's use the EE vowel because I once asked my professor that same question.

http://www.research.kevinghanrahan.com/Second%20Formant%20Relationship%20to%20Adduction%20Handout.pdf

This one. Admittedly, some of the terminology is over my head so I may not be seeing the full picture.

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Owen,

That is also the paper I'm referring to. Though it concludes:

"An increase in the frequency of F2 corresponded to an increase in the Closed Quotient (CQ), the length of time the vocal folds are closed, in a few cases, but overall the data was inconclusive. Further study is needed to clarify."

Owen, Rachsing: I am going to write to the author, to see if I can get the whole paper. This is some sort of summary.

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If speaking of the top 3 vowels to increase adduction I'm sure "ee" as in see would come up many times!

I am just curious as to what are some good alternatives especially for singers who would need extremely good adduction while navigation through registers repetitively. Maybe i (sit) or ey (stay)

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