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Nasality

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D.Starr
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I know I talk through my nose at times on certain words, I always have I just accepted it really. I twang naturally when I speak too which may also have to do with my nose I'm not sure.

I was wondering if there was a way to rid the nasal tone from my singing. Im not sure if it'd make a difference. I hold my nose and there is a buzz most often than not on certain words and vowels. It doesn't bother me but I wondered if maybe this wasn't helping me bridge and connect or adding to strain as I go up, forcing the sound into my nose too much.

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d, just a suggestion....maybe you need to get away from listening to nasal singers?

maybe you are indirectly getting infused with too much nasality from what you listen to?

check out songs by greats such as marvin gaye, jackie wilson, levi stubbs, and aretha franklin

you have to get to a point where you learn to mentally and physically direct the breath tension to specific resonating areas depending on the...... to quote dan formica..... "pitch, vowel, and intensity."

you are the director of where the breath tension goes....you can also try pinching your nostrils off and on while you sing and see how much nasality you're actually letting in.

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Plug your nose... talk. Don't try to sound like Breezy lol! Then plug your nose sing. It's going to feel uncomfortable but work with voiced zzz, vv, jj, th, l and realize that the SOUND is all coming from one place...

The vocal cords. Your nose is incapable of producing sound on its own ;) Tons of pop and r&b artist incorporate a nasal sound but imo it is an "effect" just like distortion and there is probably natural twang in your voice you just need to let it come out in your speech AND singing although it will sound "robotic" to YOU and not beautiful but testing the waters is the only way to grow and develop :)

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It's as simple as lifting the soft palate.

It's a hard thing to train though. The ah vowel, inhaling, and yawning seem to be the best at triggering the lift. Then you have to work on applying that to singing. It's tough, but thankfully you have the trusty nose pinch test to know for sure whether you're doing it right or not.

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Actually, I've been told (by CVT teacher and book) that lifting the soft palate is a separate action. Closing the velum port (sorry, not sure if that is the proper term in English; the passage to the nasal cavity) can be achieved by simply closing off the nose (not sure if this skill is individual or if everyone can do it as easily as me): pretend that something smells really bad and breathe through your mouth only (without pinching the nose).

Lifting the soft palate is much harder, at least for me. Pretending that you're surprised or yawning seem to be popular images for that, but I never get these image-based descriptions. When I manage to do it it's usually by focusing on the sound I produce - I think "more resonance", and sometimes it works.

I think that a lifted soft palate might naturally close the velum port, but I don't think the opposite is true.

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But which words are nasal man?

You understand that you need nasality to speak/sing right? You cant produce N or M without it.

If you say "nasal man" aiming to eliminate the buzz from the nose you will spend your life trying and it will not go away. Only worry about nasality if you feel that a consonant shifts the whole placement and makes everything that follows nasal, or if the vowels are nasal to begin with.

Are you SOUNDING nasal to begin with?

The correct way to check for it is not by looking for a buzz, but listenning for alterations in sound quality when you pinch/let go of the nose. If it does not alter when pinched, it was not nasal. Buzzing behind it will be present when you are resonating, and you can very well be nasal without feeling this buzz (probably will be the case when nasality is there).

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Yeah it bizzes like crazy when I plug my nose up closer to the passagio. I understand some words must buzz or be nasal. I think it is from.pushing through my nose to reach certain notes higher up but pinching my nose I buzz a lot and the sound changes drastically. I will upload some clips when I get the chance.

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I have to agree with Bob. The mind follows what it hears and many of the really young people getting into singing have been listening to 2 decades of through-the-nose nasal popular styles and unconsciously think that is the way one should sound.

I don't like a lot nasality.

Which is not to say that you don't use nasal resonance. We all do, to make any sound. However, as a singer, the sound should be coming out of your mouth, even as you use nasal resonance, which is not the same thing as sounding nasal.

The actual reason for the plug your nose test is because if you are singing through the nose, the tone changes because you have closed off the escape path you have chosen for the note.

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