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Correct Technique Vs Style

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Hi everyone there's a song cover I just heard by a guy covering "Mirrors" by Justin Timberlake. Is he using good technique? Imo he does justice to the song but is it really healthy to imitate this kind of singing?

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- JayMC

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Hmm not sure. I really don't like that cover. Some areas to me he sounds flat or breathy.

Daniel De Bourg is an amazing singer and I don't think he's signed.

This is his cover of JT's Pusher Love Girl.

Amazing head notes and blending.

I'm past covers now. The fault is people compare you to the original waaaay too much. You should strive to create your own sound and own techniques. Recently making my own music and writing has opened my eyes.

Now if only I could rid myself of this cold and conquer these four notes lol.

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I'm past covers now. The fault is people compare you to the original waaaay too much. You should strive to create your own sound and own techniques. Recently making my own music and writing has opened my eyes.

And, amen.

Rockonwhichyabadself.

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When learning to cover a song. I think about other artists who covered songs in the past. Elvis covering "My Way" made famous by Sinatra. Willy Nelson Covering "You were always on my mind" made famous by Elvis.

Janis Joplin Covering "Bobby McGee".

The point is none of these singers even tried to sound like the "Original".

Always make the song yours. Sing it like you wrote it. With your voice, Style and intention.

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When learning to cover a song. I think about other artists who covered songs in the past. Elvis covering "My Way" made famous by Sinatra. Willy Nelson Covering "You were always on my mind" made famous by Elvis.

Janis Joplin Covering "Bobby McGee".

The point is none of these singers even tried to sound like the "Original".

Always make the song yours. Sing it like you wrote it. With your voice, Style and intention.

I agree to this, too. And I suppose it depends on what we bring to this discussion from our own perspectives. "Modern Vocalist" covers everything. For example, this forum is not named "Modern Singer/Songwriter."

So, that leaves room for various definitions of a vocalist. A vocalist can be someone who sings covers and tributes. It can be someone who does that, either mimicking the original singer, or not. It can also be a vocalist is a singer/songwriter with training and/or ability.

And sometimes, a cover is more widely received than the original. Like the examples you mentioned, MDEW.

I think of "Along the Watchtower." Bob Dylan wrote it, Jimi Hendrix made a huge hit out of it.

Ray Wylie Hubbard wrote "Redneck Mothers" but Jerry Jeff Walker made it a big hit, the one that most fans know about.

What if good technique and style coincide? And how much of style is really just trappings and wrappings around the edges?

Is technique more important than style? I sang a few songs with good technique and others can hear how they sound different than the original, precisely because I was singing more technically correct than in a style.

So, I tend to sing legit and let the style come from the other instruments, if I can help it. Is that right or wrong of me? For me, singing "Brandy" or "Hurt" is the same thing as singing "I Believe in a Thing called Love" or "Black Dog." What differs, mostly, is the musical accompaniment though, to be honest, I sing "Black Dog" with what feels like more volume, even if it's not.

And I could be way off base, just thoughts that I had. No skin in the game and anyone could prove me wrong.

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There is no choice to be made, its not "vs". Technique is what allows you to control yout voice, musical styles are given by musical characteristics common to songs within the same style, and even this becomes non sense if you start to treat it in a black/white approach.

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I'm past covers now. The fault is people compare you to the original waaaay too much. You should strive to create your own sound and own techniques. Recently making my own music and writing has opened my eyes.

Phil Moufarrege (I hope I spelled that right!) has made some posts recently in some other thread that point out this statement is not entirely true. Covers can be a great source of developing originality, if you do enough of them. If you work on songs by dozens of different singers you pick up qualities of all them and combine them into a new and original voice.

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Style vs technique.... They do go hand in hand. When I mention to think about the song and the message and what it means to you, that emotion will come through.

A good example is Otis Redding and Rod stewart singing "Dock of the Bay". Listen to Otis Redding you can almost imagine A man who has lost everything and contemplating jumping into the river and taking his life.

Listen to Rod Stewart. Same song, This man sounds like he is on the top of the word because he has no responsibilities. He's Happy. He loves watching the ships and would rather be no where else.

You cannot sing a sad song with a smile and have people believe what you are singing.

You cannot play the blues on a Banjo. They Tried they had to give it another name because it just sounded too happy. The called it 'BLUEGRASS".

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You cannot play the blues on a Banjo. They Tried they had to give it another name because it just sounded too happy. The called it 'BLUEGRASS".

I disagree. Bluegrass is a different genre, it's much closer to country than blues. If you play blues on a banjo it's still blues on a banjo.

The instrument doesn't determine the genre. The only exception might be lap steel which just screams country influence to my ears, regardless of the context. But that is just a subjective opinion.

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You're missing my point, BlueGrass was a "style" that was derived from blues. The claw hammer technique that was used to play the banjo is too upbeat and happy to be bluesy. Even though if you listen a lot of the early Bluegrass songs the words are depressing but the music is happy and cheerfull. "Knocksville girl" was about a man downing his girlfriend. "Lay down your head Tom Dooley" was about a man heading for the Gallows. A lot of the early bluegrass songs were songs that the Blues Men were singing first. They couldn't call it blues with a sound that makes you want to dance.

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