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Recipe To Remove Breathiness

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Hi everyone, I think breathiness is a great effect but I don't want it in my singing at all especially in passaggio and head voice and even speaking voice lol!

How can I get rid of it? I find it especially hard if my larynx is in a lowish position.

Hope someone can help with this.

- JayMC

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Since you probably want a lowish larynx anyways I'd bet it's a cord closure issue.

The recipe for removing breathiness is at the heart of the content inside Pillars. Increasing twang, increasing subglottal pressure, quack and release onsets, practice the vocalizes well suited for it (certainly anything with twang in the title), individual help from skype lessons or send rob a file for critique, check out the suggestions for practicing and whatnot. It's all in there.

The other half of the recipe is to simply apply that stuff. Dig in and get after it. Train like an athlete.

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I thought that "gug gug gug" goog goog goog" started from closed cords and ended in closed cords which helps adduction.

It doesn't seem to help me much so I fear I am just doing it wrong lol! I wouldn't say its useless but its very forceful which may not help adduction in the end.

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i am not fully sure if twang could help!, i mean yeah twang is suposed to help with air a bit, but you also can do twangy neutral with air

Interesting...do you have a sound file of that or could you explain how it is done?

I think i've been able to get that too. It's like there's good twang resonance but with some leaky air.

But I think you can just use twang, with no other kinds of compression, and still get full closure.

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Rachsing didn't say lower larynx increase compression, he said the opposite, same as SS. It's kind of a well known fact actually

Part of the reason why for instance classical singing takes so long to train is because they're trying to maintain compression inside a lower larynx position. Same with some contemporary singing actually...it creates a very tonally balanced, full, desirable sound. But it is not at all a primitive larynx configuration.

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I always had a breathy voice. I worked my chest by doing scales 1,2,3,4,5,4,3,2,1 staccato ka ka ka then straight after staccato ah ah ah (trying to keep the same bright and punchy feeling as the ka) Then ah legato, trying to keep cord closure. basically just glottal onsets. Don't do for too long though. Work the chest with this exercise. Not sure if it's so good for the passagio

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@Gina

2 things I just decided to do today helped me lol so any semi occluded that feels "buzzy" like zz-zz-zz to ahh ahh ahh slowly while keeping the buzzy resonant feeling of zz and being conscious of "flow"

I try not to force the cords to close Gina because with the Ka you are closing the cords with "more muscle" than in head voice which exactly as you said may not help the passaggio since more mass is used to adduct the cords.

Another thing I tried is a combination of some TVS principles you will easily recognize so make a comfortable medium-loud "Uh" like a caveman then RIGHT away less then 1 seconds after you go "myow"

The uh and myow must be equally compressed for it to work but it keeps my larynx stable. Uh (small pause ) Myow like a cat in stacatto. It really helps my "Uh" have a lot of twang and closure and sound good to me.

So it goes uh-myow uh-myow staccato over and over and it should all feel relatively the same resonant and free and twangy find a balance. Just experimenting folks ;) Also I was practicing the "Uh" vowel when I saw my cat sleeping so I tried to wake him up ahahaha.

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