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Need help choosing a home study program

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Jeferee
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Hi all,

I'm currently looking for a home study course and I need your recommendations. What I'm trying to achieve is a sound similar to Bruno Mars, so I'll need one that really exemplifies this. I understand the hate towards the generic pop/r&b sound, but that is the sound that I really want to achieve.

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I'd say, find a system that seems to point toward generic pop/r&b sound. That probably seems snotty or sarcastic of me and that is not my intention.

Some systems are geared and marketed toward the hard rock / heavy metal singer. Though, from sample videos, I have seen all of the major players in the world of singing instruction have students from several different genres, even ones outside the personal preference of the instructor. For example, Daniel Formica. He sings a lot of pop, states a preference for the old Motown songs. And I have seen him do a decent Chris Cornell.

Robert Lunte sings hard rock and writes his own prog metal. And has had students who sing country, theatrical, and jazz and blues, as well as hard rock. Same with Ken Tamplin and KTVA.

The one instruction system I have seen with the most pop sounding singers, and I don't know if it's just marketing or if it really attracts the pop singer is Singing Success.

Those are the systems that have take home materials with the exception of Daniel. He teaches one on one, preferring for you to hear what is going on, rather than reading about it.

6 one way, half a dozen the other. People learn differently.

Basics are basics and then, there are the stylistic differences in each genre, mainly in the accompaniment of music.

My r&b fave is Daryl Hall. And he is a bit heavy-voiced, compared to others in the genre. He's actually more bluesy.

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I'd say, find a system that seems to point toward generic pop/r&b sound. That probably seems snotty or sarcastic of me and that is not my intention.

Some systems are geared and marketed toward the hard rock / heavy metal singer. Though, from sample videos, I have seen all of the major players in the world of singing instruction have students from several different genres, even ones outside the personal preference of the instructor. For example, Daniel Formica. He sings a lot of pop, states a preference for the old Motown songs. And I have seen him do a decent Chris Cornell.

Robert Lunte sings hard rock and writes his own prog metal. And has had students who sing country, theatrical, and jazz and blues, as well as hard rock. Same with Ken Tamplin and KTVA.

The one instruction system I have seen with the most pop sounding singers, and I don't know if it's just marketing or if it really attracts the pop singer is Singing Success.

Those are the systems that have take home materials with the exception of Daniel. He teaches one on one, preferring for you to hear what is going on, rather than reading about it.

6 one way, half a dozen the other. People learn differently.

Basics are basics and then, there are the stylistic differences in each genre, mainly in the accompaniment of music.

My r&b fave is Daryl Hall. And he is a bit heavy-voiced, compared to others in the genre. He's actually more bluesy.

Thanks for the reply, really appreciate it. I have actually tried SS, along with taking a year of private SLS lessons, but nothing seems to click. I don't have a working webcam or mic at the moment, so webcam lessons are out of the question. Are there alternatives?

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I haven't used SS, but I have taken some SLS private lessons, as well as classical private lessons in the past. I am currently using Lunte's 4 Pillars 2.5 program . I haven't been true with it because of having repetitive colds, and my full time job taking most of my time, but I have returned to it, and am now pushing full speed. I can tell you that before starting the 4 pillars, my range was up to E5, and now I can get up to G5. Its not much of a jump, but I think if I haven't had these breaks in my training, I would have extended my range even more. Hoping for this to happen in the near future as I dedicate more time for training with the program.

Good luck!

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I've noticed that some students of SLS and SS seem to gravitate to TVS 4 Pillars and KTVA and CVT to get more of the sounds that they want. And all three have home study materials. TVS has both hard copy and digital download. Lunte, author of 4 Pillars and founder of TVS does skype lessons all the time, though you will need some kind of mic for that. And a microphone is the least of the worries. What will require more of your budget is the cost of the programs.

And many is the person to have success using the materials without skype lessons. I think Geno uses KTVA and has not really had any direct lessons with Ken and he has great results.

Depends on where you are, too, as to what your access is to lessons. Fellow member and former moderator, Aaron, lives in the Seattle area and had direct personal lessons with Lunte. And has an awesome voice. And I have met Aaron in person and heard him. Beautiful voice.

What's important for you is to choose a system that uses the language or terminology that speaks to you best. As well as what you need from it.

I have studied a few different classical sources. And of the modern systems, 4 Pillars spoke the most to me, especially earlier versions, such as 1 and 2. At the time, there was not a lot of instruction or discussion on distortion, which is fine with me, as I don't seek a lot of distortion. Others' mileage may vary. As will yours.

Newer versions of Pillars address these things more fully and the newest upgrade is going to include Lunte's latest work on bridging later, holding a louder "chest" like sound for longer, depending on the song, more than anything else. That is, you can train what you want for the music you want to sing. As can with other systems.

Again, the terminology is what will speak to you. Some really enjoy the mix-and-match of discrete terms found in CVT. Some like the all chest, all the time approach (or so it seems that way) of KTVA. Others like the early head placement of early TVS as well as the plethora of examples and scales and assorted tutorials of that system.

Some prefer a more DIY approach, like CVT. From what others say, CVT is long on sound samples, short on prescribed course work. That depends on you. Some need a structured study guide, others just want pointers.

So, I have probably made it as clear as mud. Glad I could help. :lol:

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it's not just the program......it's how much you consistently and patiently apply yourself to the exercises, every day.

Excellent point, Bob. Quality instruction is great. Plethora of materials is great. But one has to use it consistently.

That's why everyone should work in a video store where they can practice during the nightly clean-up after closing down.

:D

Or, whenever someone has an hour or so of time that is uninterrupted.

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or when they pilot a jet.. :D

That's right, I don't care what my co pilot thinks when he hears me humming scales, while we are preparing for landing.

Just as long as you are NOT singing those lyrics from the song by Head East.

"Save my life I'm going down for the last time ..."

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