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Getting The Most Out Of Vocal Lessons

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Hey everyone how do you get the most out of a vocal lesson and determine which teacher is right for you? For example does it matter if it is a male or female teacher, or if they have a much different fach and style of singing than you, etc...

I know it's going to vary per person but I think anywhere from 3 - 10 lessons is what I want to take as far as my goals its really quite simple... get on track to sing through passaggio range seamlessly, repetitively, with a wide range colors and ultimately find my TRUE VOICE.

I hate asking for help, as there is some natural somewhere who's singing his ass off without any help from any teacher. But I want to turbo-charge my progress and not hurt my voice.

Does anyone here videotape/record their lessons? In my experience some teachers I have had (especially classical) have no clue how to deal with the passaggio and I have had one guy who right away started off teaching vocal fry.

Out of the 3-4 teachers I have had..... 3/4 were useless to me. Meaning they were not helping me achieve me goals.. which is why I am extremely careful who I choose to trust.

I hope to get some input on this forum from anyone who has ever taken a beneficial lesson. Have a great day.

- JayMC

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Jay I personally think its best to pick a vocal teacher with a similar fach. I took a few lessons with a high tenor in the past and we totally weren't on the same page. With rob I can nearly copy him in a way since our voices are almost the same fach. Makes things much clearer.

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My singing experience is limited, but the reason I left my singing coach is because she to my idea wasn't motivating me enough and didn't give me straight answers when I asked stuff. In fact, she once told me ''you ask quite a lot''. :D I suppose a coach that's there for you and REALLY feels like helping you out with all your questions about singing and whatsnot would be a very important thing when it comes to singing lessons.

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I've been using Eli Prinsen as my vocal coach. I am struggling a lot, just trying to get into the mysterious "head voice sensation", and he has been tremendously supportive helping me with that. When you purchase the lessons, it also includes a personally tailored MP3 lesson to practice until your next lesson.

I've also been following the Jaime Vendera Raise Your Voice and Ultimate Breathing workout.

I would highly recommend both!

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Jay I personally think its best to pick a vocal teacher with a similar fach. I took a few lessons with a high tenor in the past and we totally weren't on the same page. With rob I can nearly copy him in a way since our voices are almost the same fach. Makes things much clearer.

I have something of a different experience, I take lessons from a tenor to while I'm more of a bari, but the exercise approach we're doing is exactly the same. At first I was skeptical to this approach since his voice is light and mine is less so (it's a very light approach) however it is working great. If anything it gets me out of the whole fach thinking since apparantly I can sound light like Adam Lambert too!

However if the exact same vocal teacher had the same fach as me with said approach, that would probably make things easier so you are probably correct, however prio 1 is just that the teacher knows what he is doing, having a same fach teacher is probably just a nice bonus.

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I think you get out what you put in. It's ok saying I only want to do 3-10 lessons but if you aren't putting in the work in between, getting adequete rest, drinking water to hydrate yourself, staying fit, you won't see.much improvement. I've found so much more improvememt from tackling songs than doing scales. It seems more natural.

Take some skype lessons with Daniel. Me and him have been working on a few things. He's sorted me out and opened my eyes to loads of things. I downloaded a Skype call recorder and listen back to each call all the time.

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My singing experience is limited, but the reason I left my singing coach is because she to my idea wasn't motivating me enough and didn't give me straight answers when I asked stuff. In fact, she once told me ''you ask quite a lot''. :D I suppose a coach that's there for you and REALLY feels like helping you out with all your questions about singing and whatsnot would be a very important thing when it comes to singing lessons.

I'm sure some will disagree, but I don't believe it's a coach's place to motivate someone. Their motivation should stem from their own desire to excel and passion for what they're getting involved with. You either want to improve or you don't. You can't force someone to be motivated. I went through this frustration when I taught guitar. I dealt with students who seemed inspired during the lessons, only to come back to me with a thousand excuses as to why they didn't work on things I assigned them to do at home.

As for asking questions, I can't even fathom a coach becoming disgruntled with a student asking questions. Not only does it show the student is interested, but that's what the coach is there for. Hell, I found it more frustrating dealing with those who didn't have questions, for they generally ended up being the ones who didn't retain most of what was presented to them.

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Both yes and no. You will need to bring your own motivation to excel for sure, but it's the coach's job to keep that motivation and nurture it by adjusting his/her teachings so they suit you, be it either exercises, pedagogy etc.

Cheers!

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I am not a voice teacher. I have never had vocal lessons.

I have been a teacher in my trade. Yes, the student should arrive motivated. And there are teachers who are not inspiring.

Let us assume that the student is motivated. If motivated, the teacher can teach much by guiding. And then knowing when to get out of the way. Like riding a bicycle. At some point, you have to let go of the bike and run along side. Eventually, you can quit running.

If the student is not motivated, then there may not be a lot the teacher can do.

However, an exciting and inspiring teacher can keep up the spirits of a student who might be having a bad day.

But the learning is a partnership.

How do you get the most out of lessons? By following the lessons and working on it every spare chance. The lesson provides insights but the slow, methodical process of improvement, that happens because you are doing the work between lessons.

The teacher has responsibility, so does the student.

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I'd say I definitely felt motivated more once I took lessons....but eventually there just wasn't much of that left anymore. My teacher would also say things I'd REALLY doubt such as ''there's a whole discussion wether breath support is actually important or not''. I'd ask how that's possible since every vocal teacher on the internet that I've heard of talks about this and she'd tell me that ''those teachers got it from classical singing''. I'm glad I left there.

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