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Favorite Mixed Voice Singers

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Hey everyone, this is purely personal but I would love to hear everyone's favorite singers are who can transition from their speaking voice to head voice and vice versa.

I actually don't have one as my favorite singers have poor technique (I really like MJ but I don't think he had a need to transition lol!). I am hoping to open my eyes to other singers and give a few listens to different styles.

The only requirement is that they can seamlessly transition - that is all. 1-3 of your favorite singers is more than enough... I can youtube them myself but feel free to provide your favorite clips of them even parts of a song that inspire you to not flip or crack.

Any genre is fine but if anyone cares I really like r&b/soulful songs since I am young I definitely get too caught up in this flippy breaky auto-tuned style of music that has plagued my generation.

- JayMC

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r&b

Daryl Hall (Hall & Oates)

"I Can't go for That"

Heavy Metal

Ronnie James Dio (Dio)

"Time to Burn"

Hard Rock (good enough to get your butt kicked)

Bon Scott (AC/DC)

"Highway to Hell" (my theme song)

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MJ did transition. If you listen to the youtube videos of him vocalizing with Seth Riggs, you can hear where his bridges were. At least that is what D.Starr had noted in the past. And I think I sorta heard it too. I also heard from someone that Seth discovered MJ actually had a good baritone low range he never used.

Other great singers of this seamless transition sort:

Lou Gramm

Steve Perry

Brad Delp

Cedric Bixler-Zavala

Paul McCartney

Dallas Green

Ronnie James Dio

Geoff Tate

Ann Wilson

Kate Bush

Lots of gospel singers

And many many more.

I don't listen to much R&B so I can't help you out that much. But "mixed voice" singers are all over the place in classic rock, metal, prog rock, some in pop styles too.

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So, in my post, I had to listen to the last one more than once.

No singing lessons, by his own admission and that of others who knew him. 5' 5" tall (my wife is taller than he was by 1/2") I think about 150 lbs wringing wet. And most of that in his chutzpah. He'd sing to anyone. Young ladies, middle aged men, mothers, fathers, whoever is in the audience. That's a singer.

Entertain the crowd, get outside of your own pity party. Mixed, singing near speaking voice, whatever. Just sing.

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The first guy Daryl is so smooth and I LOVE the last clip of ac/dc I played that song on guitar before! Although they are two different sounds I can hear the ease of production... so beautiful... the guys stomach doesn't move at all when he's singing....BEAST. Thanks ron, gonna give those songs a few days to sink in.

Owen I love Michael Jackson and he neglected his low range on purpose it occasionally came out. Listen to

listen to 3:47 VERY VERY carefully let that sound sink in to you... MJ was not technically perfect he was just such an amazing artist it's ridiculous to even classify him.

Michael Jackson did whatever he wanted Seth Riggs imo just used Michael for promotion... Michael didn't need Riggs at all he could make his voice light enough to make the transition inaudible to the average person.

Do I love MJ ? yess. do i think I could do what he did without extremely solid and careful technical work... not a chance :lol: imo i would rather sacrifice some "belty" notes for a big boomy m2 :)

Owen any genre is good feel free to share some clips of singers you like I'd love to hear (or not hear) some transitions by artist you admire.

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Mixed voice is exactly that imo. When there are NO registers. Lord_Adon I can't take your word for it but if you're singing above C5 without a break then that's awesome, what's your secret? hahaha.

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Mixed voice is exactly that imo. When there are NO registers. Lord_Adon I can't take your word for it but if you're singing above C5 without a break then that's awesome, what's your secret? hahaha.

I have recorded above a C5 before. There's no break or transition or anything like that, so I don't understand.

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I'm not, I had to figure it out while singing. Before that I was yodeling quite a lot :D

But I've been perfecting this technique for quite a while. I just don't understand mix

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Falsetto, to my knowledge doesn't blend... The way I sing doesn't require any mixing, but I'm not like that when I talk... If I were to sing with my talking position I would yodel quite a bit.

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Lighter and heavier registration, finding a balance between both and doing it seamlessly. Eggplanbren since you don't seem to have any breaks show us a clip of you singing through C4-C5 and above if possible. Oh wait... lol.

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Falsetto, to my knowledge doesn't blend... The way I sing doesn't require any mixing, but I'm not like that when I talk... If I were to sing with my talking position I would yodel quite a bit.

Then the way you sing is what we are looking for. Most of us have trouble singing between D4 and G4. Like you we would Yodel trying to sing higher. You may have found What classical singers call covering.

Some of us are still trying to sing like we speak and are still working on the singing voice.

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Bruno Mars although he isn't the healthiest sound to go for imo has a solid technique... there was a video where he fully does a transition. I think he just breaks into falsetto stylistically because he can sing high enough without using it!

I like Delp alot he is very smooth it's great to watch these singers, thanks everyone for your contribution!

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i have to learn michael jackson's billy jean for a show.......major challenge

please listen carefully to this acapella recording and absorb, really take in the nuances, the details, dynamics, and intensity of his vocals...

this is a real good example of why i'm so big on breath support...to get that sound and punch? no way on earth without a well conditioned lower core and real skill at breath management .

also, note the use of a "chid" instead of "kid" in the vocals....

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Www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TjlbT4ttc0

Daniel heiman everyday of the week, just one big voice topping at d6 crazy mofo

Edit: one day im gonna be able to nail highlander the one live... That will be a good day :)

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Jay, here are some clips of great seamless early bridging, cause you seem to be more into that than the powerful Lou Gramm/Brad Delp screamy kind of thing.

The way they are singing these lighter pop songs is very similar to what I think you are looking for with r&b.

Notice how they narrow their vowels. They intentionally don't drop the jaw too much. That can help with early bridging. Maybe I should have posted this in your early bridging thread. Anyways, have a listen, these guys are doing some seriously well coordinated early bridging.

Brian Wilson

Pete Townshend

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23Ksg4LnbaI

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Owen, I love Wonderful by Brian Wilson! What a crazy song. I don't hear much bridging though, pretty much the whole thing's in neutral apart from one or two notes. You can hear the flageolet on the highest pitches.

There's also lots of double tracking going on (or whatever you call it, overdubbing the same singer to make it sound "chorusy" and fuller. I think sometimes we listen to recordings and expect to get a certain sound and we don't realise that it's been doubled and put through an EQ and a bit of reverb. ;)

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I disagree egg, what I'm hearing is a very gradual bridge. You can't tell exactly where it begins on ends but if you juxtapose the lowest and highest notes you can tell they are not the same coordination. Especially since the volume didn't raise as he went higher. Even though there is probably some compression on the vocal track, you can still tell he's keeping the volume the same throughout or if anything lower on the high end.

If I sang that the way he does I would definitely feel a different coordination on the bottom than the top. The bottom would be TA dominant and the top CT dominant, thus the sensation of a bridge.

If he were using the same coordination down bottom as up top, the low notes would be comparatively weaker and quieter, like this:

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If going into flageolet is considered bridging then I agree 100%. :) There is a definite sensation change as you do that.

I don't know CVT super well but I thought his high stuff was in neutral mode...same with the other videos I've posted.

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