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Lower the volume as I increase in pitch...

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gilad
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Hey Guys.

Today, in my practice session, I decided to lower my volume throughout the exercises. Don't know why I didn't consider doing it before. Anyways, it became much easier to go higher and higher. That being said, my voice sounded really falsettoey in the highs which wasn't like that when my volume was higher or i guess ill call it, when i used more air pressure.

My question is, is this falsettoey high the way its suppose to sound up there?

In the last few days, i have also been able to reach my toppest note of G#5 and it doesnt hurt, or strain, just difficult to get there., Before when I tried to hit my highest which was G5, one semi tone lower, it felt as if I am doing something bad to my folds. Can someone please reflect on this?

Thanks guys!

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This is pretty much "lift up pull back". To answer your first question: Yes, you will get into a pretty light falsettoey mode (called "neutral" in CVT) if you sing very high notes on low volume. On high pitches a more "meaty" metallic sound requires more volume.

The lower volume is a good tool to get the resonance right, and that's probably the reason why you did make progress here. If your resonance setup is good, you need less "pressure" to hit higher notes. If your resonance setup is bad, you need more pressure and chances are you will break from too much pressure.

The low volume falsetto thing is a great tool to get the 'placement', which means the resonance setup right. You basically put the resonance setup into your muscle memory on a low volume with almost airy sound and after that you can apply pressure for a more "meaty" sound.

Your practicing with that light mass/low volume approach probably improved your resonance setup, which makes you able to approach the full sounding higher notes with less air pressure and therefore less strain.

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No. The end result should be maintain the same volume or slight increase as you go higher. Lowering the volume up high is more of a beginner training thing to ease them into the bridging process. Or to brush up on fundamentals if a more advanced singer's bridging is getting too clunky.

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Doesn't an increase in pitch also men an increase in volume?

F.ex. a 50% max volume A4 is louder than a 50%max volume D4? So one should keep the volume the same or slightly louder

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Thanks Guys.

Looks like i got two completely opposite answers on this one...

So which one is it, the higher the pitch, the lower the volume, or the higher the pitch the higher the volume. I think, and thats because how i felt no strain, that the higher i go, i need to use less volume. At least in my head.

Do i need to do the whole excercise in low volume that way everything is in one line?

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I usually SING with an increase in volume going to high notes.

I usually READ or HEAR that that is not correct.

Lately in my shows, I've been trying to NOT let the volume get away from me on higher notes (as in the past). I'm in several bands and I'm a belter. So to pace myself a bit and make sure that I can fulfill all my gigs , I'm learning to not go with the pedal to the floor all the time and ratchet back the volume a bit. It's only taken me 35 years to figure this out. There are nights when it really helps me to do this and there are nights that I don't notice how much it's helping. However, the recovery time seems to be shortened because of it.

Not sure if this helps.

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It all depends on the voice and the problems occurring. Finding good technique from a low volume is great like throwing a jab slow and perfect before you put some strength into it. If your going higher and losing connection give it a little intensity if your going higher and getting to loud and splatting lower the intensity and change up the vowel a little. Answering this question is a lose lose for anyone because if I can't hear what you are doing I could give wrong advice. Volume is one thing, resonance another, pushing another etc

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again, i think it all depends on the sound you are going for!

what genre....

if you are needing to be really powerful up high, you must have a proper mix of "appropriate" controlled breath tension and fold adduction. higher power notes mean stretched, taut folds..if you don't supply enough breath tension, you simply aren't going to generate the note.

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What a wonderful interview. Thanks for linking that, Bob. However, it doesn't seem to bear any relation to your words above the embed.

Warning, rant to follow:

I hope, against hope, that people will actually listen to the words of these ladies, as well as the host. Notice the "mental" aspect that is highlighted. That's not just me saying it.

Notice the observation of the host that a tenor should sing tenor and not try to sound like a baritone. I know that will bring lots of grief. "Well, yeah, they were talking about opera."

Good point. Why, then, should we bring in advice from opera singers? Just so that we can say it does not apply to popular singing? Does that make us feel better about ourselves? It's an honest question. I have no illusions that I am an opera singer.

Notice the importance of passaggio. While they say yes, work, in practice on the "notes above the staff," in concert, they stay in the range they have, not always using extremes. Notice that the use of the highest notes depends on the role and how much of it is required in an evening's performance. These are trained opera singers telling us, whether we want to hear it or not, that the voice has just so much endurance in an evening, even a trained voice. Ronnie James Dio said as much, according to the advice he gave to singer Ron Keel. They are talking about pacing and they do not say to overtrain in singing practice to make the peformance easier. They say to train to the performance. In other words, "train how you will fight."

So, all those people that think they need to train the 5th octave every day for hours, you are trying to do something that even trained sopranos don't think is good. But what do they know? They only had an actual career singing.

Here's a little secret to success. Find out what successful people do. Then, do that.

Rant over.

Customary disclaimer, I am not a vocal professional, expert, or anything. Just an electrician in Texas who likes to sing.

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It all depends on the voice and the problems occurring. Finding good technique from a low volume is great like throwing a jab slow and perfect before you put some strength into it. If your going higher and losing connection give it a little intensity if your going higher and getting to loud and splatting lower the intensity and change up the vowel a little. Answering this question is a lose lose for anyone because if I can't hear what you are doing I could give wrong advice. Volume is one thing, resonance another, pushing another etc

Excellent post.

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I think I needed to name the post "lowering the air pressure as going higher in pitch" as I noticed today its not the volume that decreases but the amount of air pressure used.

Having said that, I do really feel less strained when i do the whole exercise in a kind of low volume. A few months ago, when I used to try to reduce volume to do the exercises, all I would get is air. (Glottis open) but now I get a nice clean connected tone even when reducing volume. It feels real good.

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The thing in my case is; when I go higher in pitch, I use more pressure. This doesn't strain your vocal chords. Speech level singing teaches you to maintain the same volume throughout your complete range. To obtain the same consistency in your higher range as in your lower range, you'll have to use that pressure to maintain a certain stability. I think that the best mode to use this in CVT would be curbing.

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The thing in my case is; when I go higher in pitch, I use more pressure. This doesn't strain your vocal chords. Speech level singing teaches you to maintain the same volume throughout your complete range. To obtain the same consistency in your higher range as in your lower range, you'll have to use that pressure to maintain a certain stability. I think that the best mode to use this in CVT would be curbing.

Hey Mendel,

More pressure? I am trying to wrap my mind around it. If the folds are thinner, you will need less pressure to get them same result as when they are thicker like in the low range. Am I wrong?

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Gilad,

It varies a lot depending on the coordination. But the stretching of the vocal folds will make them more tense and that will increase the sub glottal pressure.

So what you are saying when they are thin, you need more pressure? Weird it doesn't feel that way to me when exercising. This is pretty confusing.. What about air volume (Not gain, but amount)?

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Gilad,

Like I said it depends on the coordination. You may be using less adduction when going higher (lightening the coordination) and that will of course require less pressure. But if you keep the same adduction then the stretching of the folds will require more adduction.

Well, it doesn't sound airy, so I assume my adduction is good in the higher pitch. Have no idea whether i am using more or less adduction...

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How about when we talk about volume of air? We should use less volume of air as we go higher, but more pressure?

Sorry if we are going around in circle here. Just confused that's all. :rolleyes:

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gilad,

frisell has a way of explaining things that makes things fall into place or substantiates things. see if this helps:

taken from his book...

The singing tone is not produced by allowing the air to gush out of the lungs. One of the most misleading principles frequently told to students is: “Don’t force the tone, let it float, effortlessly, on the breath.” This implies that the singer is free from any “work load” in producing basic tone. The superior tone is never free from any work load because it is produced and prolonged by the energy of compressed breath, being retained by the singer within his lungs, and skillfully “fed” to the vocal cords, and which must flow continuously, for as long as he desires the presently sung tone to continue. As the singing voice mounts the scale to higher and higher pitches, the amount of breath pressure against the vocal cords must increase proportionately. And, an equally increased amount of counter resistance, created by the breath is applied by the muscles of both registers. When the singer ascends the range, all of these factors make great demands upon him for increased energy. This is quite the opposite reality, from the wrong principle of “effortlessly produced singing”. Conversely, when the singer descends the range from a higher pitch to a lower one, the energy demand is reduced, proportionately, as well as breath energy, but the energy demand is never entirely eliminated. There must always remain some amount of breath pressure being directed against the vocal cords, and breath continuously flowing through them, until the tone has been terminated. The continuous application of breath tension “holds” or “clamps” the two registers together, so that they serve as a counter-resisting force to the stream of breath pressure, flowing through the vocal cords, and producing the desired pitch.

Anthony Frisell; Adolph Caso (2010-04-22). THE TENOR VOICE (Kindle Locations 684-685). Branden Books. Kindle Edition.

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The key words in frissels statements were breathe flow continuously, and fed to the cords. The words to be cautious of so you don't get misled were compressed, clamp, hold. Those words can mess you up if you are not careful.

Oh man, if the breath keeps going (and I don't stop it by accident, or uknowingly) singing works so well.

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gilad,

frisell has a way of explaining things that makes things fall into place or substantiates things. see if this helps:

taken from his book...

The singing tone is not produced by allowing the air to gush out of the lungs. One of the most misleading principles frequently told to students is: “Don’t force the tone, let it float, effortlessly, on the breath.” This implies that the singer is free from any “work load” in producing basic tone. The superior tone is never free from any work load because it is produced and prolonged by the energy of compressed breath, being retained by the singer within his lungs, and skillfully “fed” to the vocal cords, and which must flow continuously, for as long as he desires the presently sung tone to continue. As the singing voice mounts the scale to higher and higher pitches, the amount of breath pressure against the vocal cords must increase proportionately. And, an equally increased amount of counter resistance, created by the breath is applied by the muscles of both registers. When the singer ascends the range, all of these factors make great demands upon him for increased energy. This is quite the opposite reality, from the wrong principle of “effortlessly produced singing”. Conversely, when the singer descends the range from a higher pitch to a lower one, the energy demand is reduced, proportionately, as well as breath energy, but the energy demand is never entirely eliminated. There must always remain some amount of breath pressure being directed against the vocal cords, and breath continuously flowing through them, until the tone has been terminated. The continuous application of breath tension “holds” or “clamps” the two registers together, so that they serve as a counter-resisting force to the stream of breath pressure, flowing through the vocal cords, and producing the desired pitch.

Anthony Frisell; Adolph Caso (2010-04-22). THE TENOR VOICE (Kindle Locations 684-685). Branden Books. Kindle Edition.

Nice excerpt videohere! Thank you very much. Looks like you got me hooked on purchasing "The tenor voice". :cool:

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