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Extreme compression

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Hello everyone I realized for so many purposes I will need to be able to sing "firmly" then loosely. Loud singing nd resonant then breathy for artistic reasons. When I sing firmly it has a lot to do with air and the vocal fold response.... being efficient in both ways.

I was wondering what is some safe ways to engage fold compression from the TVS or CVT material or any other source from C3-C6 I find that I feel safer if I get the "compression" in the upper register because if I can make an effortless medium volume compressed sound I know I am not overblowing the folds.

I realize at first the "compressed sound" is not the "pretty sound" but I just want a little more control and refining over when and HOW to add compression.

For example if I do a GUG GUG GUG in the chest voice compared to a quack and release onset from pillars... the latter helps my voice so much more although it is not a "pretty sound"

Also when I have extreme compression in terms of areas of note it is kind of like "holding" the air and voice together but not with the throat and I can engage in C3-C6 effortless like some kind of twangy vocal beast function lol

Compression for me cannot physically be executed safely without support... there's no possible way the folds alone can hold back so much air and thats what the high voice has taught me.

What are some exercises so I can engage fold and breath compression simultaneously and how can I use compression safely then lessen it later.

- JayMC

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Here is me establishing a kind of "compression" hold thing with Ngg-ooo but I lost some of the hold on the slide down then I tried a compressed "ouh" as in book and I kind of the the compression there but at the same time it was a bit tense and if its "curbing" it is indeed hard to keep it low-volume and high volume. Also what is the highest note there?

I want to figure out how to keep that compression the whole range. so ya kind of like curbing or in TVS basically curbing-like neautral - trying not to waste air!

its mostly in low head voice range/upper chest range... its hard for me to not waste air without "getting folds" involved.

Curbing is basically what TVS is teaching imo but TVS the "support" and "hold" comes after a boatload of practice but I realized if I can isolate that "hold" function and tie the breath pressure with the voice if I

specialize in learning to keep and maintain healthy compression.. easier said than done because it involves using very little fold but very carefully executed breath!

although the note seem high it is not as max-efficiency yet as I am losing a "hold" on the notes air is escaping.

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Compression yes, but you need to be more aggressive to make curbing work.

All the clips you've posted that I've heard have been examples of very careful and soft singing. There is lots of talk about how singing must feel comfortable and without any strain, but this can lead some people to be too cautious.

If you wan't to sing in anything other than neutral, you must accept a more raw and aggressive sound: more volume and a stronger hold for curbing. Don't be so cautious.

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Jay, please send us a file of a quacky "ee". That's it. Nothing fancy. You don't even have to attach it inside a quack&release onset necessarily, but that helps. But send us a file of a quacky ee, twanged as hard as you can.

Do it in chest voice, head voice, wherever. I swear that is the only way to truly train "extreme compression".

If you just keep working on that, with the right form, over time you will get more buzz and less wind. It just takes time. But you have to start doing precisely that, the quacky ee. Not uh, not oo. Etc.

Some other decent twang vowels are ih, ae, and eh. But at the heart of it all is a narrow, pointy quacky ee.

When you do the quacky ee, smile wide, keep your mouth nearly closed, and lift your upper lift to show your teeth. Aim the sound at your top front teeth. Keep your tongue very close to that spot so as to keep a super bright formant resonating right there.

It does not sound good, it's a strength exercise.

If there's one thing that has measurably improved drastically since my first lesson with Rob over a year ago and now, it's my ability to activate that extreme compression. No matter the condition of my voice. It used to be that very rarely I was able to do it, now it's very rarely I am unable to do it.

But it all comes from the ee. The "ee" grows twang more than any other vowel in my experience.

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Compression yes, but you need to be more aggressive to make curbing work.

All the clips you've posted that I've heard have been examples of very careful and soft singing. There is lots of talk about how singing must feel comfortable and without any strain, but this can lead some people to be too cautious.

If you wan't to sing in anything other than neutral, you must accept a more raw and aggressive sound: more volume and a stronger hold for curbing. Don't be so cautious.

Nalyd,

are you a CVT teacher or student? Your posts are dead on.

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I agree with Geran. It's mostly a clean sound at soft volume. Toward the hump in the waveform, you get some spot on resonance which gives that apparent volume increase but that is not a compressed sound.

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Here is me establishing a kind of "compression" hold thing with Ngg-ooo but I lost some of the hold on the slide down then I tried a compressed "ouh" as in book and I kind of the the compression there but at the same time it was a bit tense and if its "curbing" it is indeed hard to keep it low-volume and high volume. Also what is the highest note there?

I want to figure out how to keep that compression the whole range. so ya kind of like curbing or in TVS basically curbing-like neautral - trying not to waste air!

its mostly in low head voice range/upper chest range... its hard for me to not waste air without "getting folds" involved.

Curbing is basically what TVS is teaching imo but TVS the "support" and "hold" comes after a boatload of practice but I realized if I can isolate that "hold" function and tie the breath pressure with the voice if I

specialize in learning to keep and maintain healthy compression.. easier said than done because it involves using very little fold but very carefully executed breath!

although the note seem high it is not as max-efficiency yet as I am losing a "hold" on the notes air is escaping.

You have already gotten good advice but let me say that I don't hear any type of support here at all. That might be the sound you are going for here but it would be nice to hear you do anything with a compressed air from low.

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Nalyd,

are you a CVT teacher or student? Your posts are dead on.

Hi analog

I'm a CVT fan. I've read the book and had 3 or 4 lessons with certified teachers.

I started almost ten years ago, but have been singing on and off. For long periods of time I forget about it altogether . I remember you from the cvt forum, you were the one who was attacked by one of your pets, when practicing for too long in edge-mode :D

My alias over there was mungfield

Good to see you again

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Hi analog

I'm a CVT fan. I've read the book and had 3 or 4 lessons with certified teachers.

I started almost ten years ago, but have been singing on and off. For long periods of time I forget about it altogether . I remember you from the cvt forum, you were the one who was attacked by one of your pets, when practicing for too long in edge-mode :D

My alias over there was mungfield

Good to see you again

Ha...great to have you here man!!!

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Compression yes, but you need to be more aggressive to make curbing work.

All the clips you've posted that I've heard have been examples of very careful and soft singing. There is lots of talk about how singing must feel comfortable and without any strain, but this can lead some people to be too cautious.

If you wan't to sing in anything other than neutral, you must accept a more raw and aggressive sound: more volume and a stronger hold for curbing. Don't be so cautious.

there you go, that's what i like to see.....nice.

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