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Swelling head voice : TVS workouts

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forest_gimp
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Hello guys,

I have bought Pillars and here is a sample of me doing some of the different " release " workouts aimed at strenthening the head voice.

https://www.box.com/s/z24id3kkzd3eonn77wdp

I start with a windy onset and bring back chord closure, twang, and darken the colour using one of the TVS favored wovel.

At the end, i also do a " contract and release ", starting with a semi occluded twangy sound and releasing it into a full head voice sound.

Well, this is what i am TRYING to do. I wanted to know if i am doing the work correctly! Any tip to make it sound beefier?

Also, i have been training a lot recently, and my jaw is somewhat tired ( tension feeling above the soft palate area ). I don't understand, because i have trained to drop my jaw using a mirror, but it seems it is still tensed.

Or is this fatigue sensation normal when you practise a lot and so the muscles lifting the soft palate get tired.

I would appreciate a technical imput on my exercice!

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Hello Gilad,

Rob posted a video not so long ago introducing to these exercices, and they are in my version of Pillars, but they might not be in the former versions.

The exercice is designed to chose a definite onset and increase twang, suport, and coverage ( intrinsic anchoring ) to end up with a powerful head voice, and thus, strenghten it.

You can start with a windy, falseto-ish phonation, for instance, and then gradually increase chord closure. This is the mezza di vocce onset in the book. This is what i was trying to achieve.

The other onset i do here is called " contract and release " in the book.

Well, i think i will indeed see if Rob can give me an answer, but if you are a regular Pillars trainer, it could be good to have some imput from any seasoned singer.

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First of all great job. Going by the sound you are pretty much doing everything right.

I'm pretty sure you're supposed to start the mesa di voce onset with the training vowel instead of the "oo" that you're doing, but I have an older version of pillars so I don't know for sure. Either way, what you are doing is probably still fine.

Don't overdo the jaw drop. You should be dropping your jaw just enough to make it sound and feel good, not dropping it as far as you can. That being said if it doesn't hurt awfully, it's probably just normal tension that will gradually phase out the more you train. Same with tension in the soft palate.

On the contract and release, you are introducing a teeny hint of vocal distortion characteristics. If you want to get rid of that, try holding back the air a little bit (think of adding a slight inhale sensation to the exhale, you might also know this as "support") and opening the throat more and that should go away. That being said, don't obsess over it, it's fine to just let that subtle distortion be. Rob has told me that many times.

Now, can you give me some tips on how to get that kind of vibrato please? :lol:

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Hey Forest,

So from my understanding you are talking about the calibrate your onsets, and tune the formant exercises in the foundation building routine correct?

Yes, i think so. I will confirm you this when i will have Pillars in front of me.

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First of all great job. Going by the sound you are pretty much doing everything right.

I'm pretty sure you're supposed to start the mesa di voce onset with the training vowel instead of the "oo" that you're doing, but I have an older version of pillars so I don't know for sure. Either way, what you are doing is probably still fine.

Don't overdo the jaw drop. You should be dropping your jaw just enough to make it sound and feel good, not dropping it as far as you can. That being said if it doesn't hurt awfully, it's probably just normal tension that will gradually phase out the more you train. Same with tension in the soft palate.

On the contract and release, you are introducing a teeny hint of vocal distortion characteristics. If you want to get rid of that, try holding back the air a little bit (think of adding a slight inhale sensation to the exhale, you might also know this as "support") and opening the throat more and that should go away. That being said, don't obsess over it, it's fine to just let that subtle distortion be. Rob has told me that many times.

Now, can you give me some tips on how to get that kind of vibrato please? :lol:

Helo Owen, thanks for this detailled answer. Yes, I overdid the jaw drop thing, and overally, it s only a slight discomfort that is going to end.

For the starting wovel, i think i phonate a " oo " because i associate this wovel with falsetto. And for the contract ad release, i just saw that i skipped the first stage of the exercice as desceibed in the book. You have to start with a airy sound ( to make sure your glotis is opened, then close your mouth, and while your mouth closed, twand to get the buzzy sound, and then release the sound.

For the vibrato : i have devloped my own training routine to get this vibrato. Before implementing it on head voice, i developed it on my chest voice onsets.

The best way to find it is to start with a semi ocluded phonation ( the huming stuff ). My favorite sound for this exercice is the " ng " as in " sing ". You should get to a point when your voice feels really light and buzzy. On top of this buzz, start imagining a slight wave on your voice, while supporting it.

For me, it is also about visualisation. I can hear my vibrato and visualize the number of oscillation before i implement it.

I can send you a soundtrack of vibrato on semi ocluded phonation. The big benefit of this exercice is that you can train just anywhere. I have trained my vibrato for about a year with semi occluded phonation. I did it in the car, waiting for the train, in halls, in party invitations, anywhere :-)

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First of all great job. Going by the sound you are pretty much doing everything right.

I'm pretty sure you're supposed to start the mesa di voce onset with the training vowel instead of the "oo" that you're doing, but I have an older version of pillars so I don't know for sure. Either way, what you are doing is probably still fine.

Don't overdo the jaw drop. You should be dropping your jaw just enough to make it sound and feel good, not dropping it as far as you can. That being said if it doesn't hurt awfully, it's probably just normal tension that will gradually phase out the more you train. Same with tension in the soft palate.

On the contract and release, you are introducing a teeny hint of vocal distortion characteristics. If you want to get rid of that, try holding back the air a little bit (think of adding a slight inhale sensation to the exhale, you might also know this as "support") and opening the throat more and that should go away. That being said, don't obsess over it, it's fine to just let that subtle distortion be. Rob has told me that many times.

Now, can you give me some tips on how to get that kind of vibrato please? :lol:

Helo Owen, thanks for this detailled answer. Yes, I overdid the jaw drop thing, and overally, it s only a slight discomfort that is going to end.

For the starting wovel, i think i phonate a " oo " because i associate this wovel with falsetto. And for the contract ad release, i just saw that i skipped the first stage of the exercice as desceibed in the book. You have to start with a airy sound ( to make sure your glotis is opened, then close your mouth, and while your mouth closed, twand to get the buzzy sound, and then release the sound.

For the vibrato : i have devloped my own training routine to get this vibrato. Before implementing it on head voice, i developed it on my chest voice onsets.

The best way to find it is to start with a semi ocluded phonation ( the huming stuff ). My favorite sound for this exercice is the " ng " as in " sing ". You should get to a point when your voice feels really light and buzzy. On top of this buzz, start imagining a slight wave on your voice, while supporting it.

For me, it is also about visualisation. I can hear my vibrato and visualize the number of oscillation before i implement it.

I can send you a soundtrack of vibrato on semi ocluded phonation. The big benefit of this exercice is that you can train just anywhere. I have trained my vibrato for about a year with semi occluded phonation. I did it in the car, waiting for the train, in halls, in party invitations, anywhere :-)

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For the vibrato : i have devloped my own training routine to get this vibrato. Before implementing it on head voice, i developed it on my chest voice onsets.

The best way to find it is to start with a semi ocluded phonation ( the huming stuff ). My favorite sound for this exercice is the " ng " as in " sing ". You should get to a point when your voice feels really light and buzzy. On top of this buzz, start imagining a slight wave on your voice, while supporting it.

For me, it is also about visualisation. I can hear my vibrato and visualize the number of oscillation before i implement it.

I can send you a soundtrack of vibrato on semi ocluded phonation. The big benefit of this exercice is that you can train just anywhere. I have trained my vibrato for about a year with semi occluded phonation. I did it in the car, waiting for the train, in halls, in party invitations, anywhere :-)

That is brilliant! Thank you so much, I will start doing that.

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That is brilliant! Thank you so much, I will start doing that.

And here is the sample :

https://www.box.com/s/tdjsudhdagsdsebqru3k

I found out that i feel the vibrato both in my larynx and in my support muscles. You spontaneuously want to get rid of that air to take a breathe, but you have to keep a very regular flow of air and do not release anything once you get the vibrato sensation.

This is the first stage of my home made vibrato workout :-)

Once you get this wavering sound, the next stage is to release the sound from the semi occluded phonation to a normal chest voice onset.

When I became comfy with that, i practised tons of songs with vibrato with the sole purpose of developing it from training onsets to singing.

To implement it in your head voice, it is the same workout.

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true, pure, natural, 6-7 pulse, unmanufactured vibrato happens or it doesn't happen......i don't believe you can make vibrato......it's a byproduct or result of very efficient phonation.

some singer's just have it naturally, and others need to develop it....but naturally.

but the key is to develop or find your "natural" vibrato.

i bought this awhile ago and it was very helpful for the money.

http://www.masteringvibrato.com/

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true, pure, natural, 6-7 pulse, unmanufactured vibrato happens or it doesn't happen......i don't believe you can make vibrato......it's a byproduct or result of very efficient phonation.

some singer's just have it naturally, and others need to develop it....but naturally.

but the key is to develop or find your "natural" vibrato.

I agree, twin brother from another mother.

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