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Robert Lunte - Vocal Workout Demonstration - "The Hero"

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Robert Lunte
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Here is a vocal demonstration of a classic workout from "The Four Pillars of Singing"... Enjoy and Im happy to answer any questions you may have.

... I repost this and start over for everyone... including myself... Inspired to do so, by Jens and D.Starr. I don't want to disappoint ... I consider Jens to be a friend and a good guy.

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Thanks rob! Okay im getting abit down and dirty here, i posted a video some threads back about how you can build up your headvoice and "falsetto"( for you CVT nerds ;) neutral and metallikeneutral)

This exercise Robert is demonstrating here is a great asset to this and one of the reasons i recommended pillars, it's also cool to notice the extra "beef" thats added to Roberts voice here(For you CVT nerds this is closer to overdrive and edge than neutral/MLN) It really works out your voice, but you can also choose to do this exercise lighter(more heady/neutral/MLN) for great results.

Cheers guys :)

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I'm glad you did that.

Basically keep the throat from closing completely by allowing a little more air.

Well, I don't want to get called out for not describing exactly in perfect detail what is going on, Im not a vocal scientist, but roughly speaking, yes... in the sense that, as far as my sensations and feelings of this phonation are concerned, .... pretty much, when I get to about A4+, where we all know, things start feeling different.... I have trained myself to relax the glottis... to back off on the bodies instinct to squeeze the twanger. I then compensate the loss of the glottal support/energy, but increasing sub-glottal respiration pressure, or engaging more respiration. Also, a subtle modification to to "uh" shadings seems to help relax the glottis as well.

a. relax the glottis

b. increase respiration

c. tune the formant to a proper vowel, it seems, "uh" is very helpful here

All three of these technical components, calibrate in a balanced, fluid movement at the same time.

The result is;

1). fatigue goes away, completely.

2). the aesthetic or tone of ducks goes away... the phonation moves away from quack vocal mode, which is what you want.

3). The phonation seems to take on a little bit of a warmer harmonic shading, which is, 9 out of 10 times, preferred... and further removes you from the "duck spectrum".

4). Overlay distortion begins to also kick in as a potential added, vocal effect benefit.

This is something that I am teaching all my students now with great, consistent success and results. I don't have all the answers regarding the physiology behind it or the acoustics, only some of the answers... What I do have all the answers for is, how to hear it, how to train it and how to help singers learn how to do it.

I will also say, this is the result of my work with:

1). TVS overlay distortion work flows.

2). TVS Appoggio technical components, or the things I think help increase your Appoggio/respiration.

3). And the above mentioned balance of compression, respiration and vowel.

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Thanks rob! Okay im getting abit down and dirty here, i posted a video some threads back about how you can build up your headvoice and "falsetto"( for you CVT nerds ;) neutral and metallikeneutral)

This exercise Robert is demonstrating here is a great asset to this and one of the reasons i recommended pillars, it's also cool to notice the extra "beef" thats added to Roberts voice here(For you CVT nerds this is closer to overdrive and edge than neutral/MLN) It really works out your voice, but you can also choose to do this exercise lighter(more heady/neutral/MLN) for great results.

Cheers guys :)

Nice work Jens... I like how your producing content and becoming an Educator... Its very attractive and interesting to me and the TVS CI program in Sweden... but thats another story...

The points in your video are very consistent with the following TVS Methodology ideas:

1). Falsetto (or an open glottis position) is a configuration that has to be used for training sometimes. It helps establish placement, releases constriction, and gives you an 'onset' that is clean... to prepare to add the musculature.

2). I love that you point out that C/H is only a metaphor, but you point out, from a teacher/student perspective, that there is some value to the C/H metaphor, for the simple fact that its just easy to grasp in that way. Well DONE JENS!!!

3). You point out that some vocal modes are "primitive" or more intuitive and others are "trained" , more exotic and need to be trained. EXCELLENT!

4). You are also, essentially, teaching onsets here... this is essentially, Wind & Release Onsets and Messa di Voce Onsets... both characterized by an open glottis position.

5). You then point out that, after getting placement, releasing constriction, etc... all the benefits of open glottal configurations/modes... the student needs to then begin to work on bringing in the musculature to transform Falsetto into Twang + Larynx, Vowel, Tongue, Respiration.

Actually this videos is VERY TVS in my opinion... Im really excited to see that the ideas in "Pillars" are helping you and I think, helping you to be able to explain things better. Im just thrilled to hear this... also because I respect your work as a singer quite a lot too...

Wow, very impressive Jens, you seem to be growing... your a good teacher... this is very TVS...

Thanks for sharing...

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Glad you posted this video Rob.

Recently got back into doing very quiet and light edge exercises and even singing on key but quieter and lighter and my voice has suddenly just changed. So I decided to get back into the TVS stuff and I'm seeing improvements off the bat.

The only problem was that I was naturally squeezing and quacking around F4/G4 above that I'm find. It would sound like my cords were distorting or creaking. Never felt any pain just felt more like I was practicing distortion than a pure tone. Going to try this in the morning and report back.

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Just to let you know this video help things alot for me.You have good insticts for helping people and using terms that all can understand. When you are talking to students use your terms and do not worry about whether they fall in line with scientific findings. You are teaching. We are learning. That is what counts.

If you are submitting a paper for scientific research then worry about whether your terms are correct.

Thanks again Robert.

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Just to let you know this video help things alot for me.You have good insticts for helping people and using terms that all can understand. When you are talking to students use your terms and do not worry about whether they fall in line with scientific findings. You are teaching. We are learning. That is what counts.

If you are submitting a paper for scientific research then worry about whether your terms are correct.

Thanks again Robert.

Thanks MDEW... Yes, that is what people tell me... that I have a way of making this stuff easier to understand... and really, THAT is my purpose. THAT is what my job is and THAT is what I am paid to do... to try to find ways to communicate these complicated and abstract ideas, so that the 'average consumer' (not saying your average, just saying your not a voice scientist or a coach), can grasp these concepts and get progress. Hopefully with some humor, a nice production, a good demo, etc... these are my strengths, this is where I really shine...

What turns me on EXACTLY posts like what Jen's posted... where he is teaching an idea and I hear some perspectives and ideas that I think I may of been influential on... and now he carries that on through, to new people... that is what Im passionate about.

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Excellent post, Robert. And I, too, have enjoyed Jens' videos. For one thing, his pronunciation of English and even harder, the use of its syntax, is excellent. He really speaks English, accent aside. But what I also like, and I think you have stressed this in your tutorials and posts, is that some of these exercises are for sounds, only. Some sounds, you may not actually use in a song. But the sounds train something in the voice that you may need.

For example, the now often maligned quack. Of course, you are not going to quack a song. But you might have some relative degree of quack, even just a little, only at certain points. Especially for style. Like the time I shared in Bob's video thread, "Play that Funky Music" by Wild Cherry.

Same with things that Jens was showing. And for me, it has to be fun. Sorry guys, I know this all suppose to be training and work. But it needs to be rewarding, in and of itself.

Others' mileage may vary. Some need to think of it as work and that gets them inspired. For me, no. I already get plenty of stress at work (trust me, you have no idea and even a plethora of my gargantuan posts cannot relate to you what that is like.)

Singing, for me, is an escape, whether it is an actual song, or an exercise, or just goofing off. I am going to have fun and ain't nothing anyone can do to stop me.

The perfect weekend? Reading stuff on the forum, recording something, not thinking anything about work until about 5:45 am, any Monday, doing about 70 mph, on I-35 south, approaching IH-635.

"Momma's gonna worry, I've been a bad, bad boy ..."

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Glad you posted this video Rob.

Recently got back into doing very quiet and light edge exercises and even singing on key but quieter and lighter and my voice has suddenly just changed. So I decided to get back into the TVS stuff and I'm seeing improvements off the bat.

The only problem was that I was naturally squeezing and quacking around F4/G4 above that I'm find. It would sound like my cords were distorting or creaking. Never felt any pain just felt more like I was practicing distortion than a pure tone. Going to try this in the morning and report back.

I was at that point too, recently, and what Robert suggests really works great. You have to relax the glottis and increase respiration.

Relaxing the glottis to me feels like "relaxing into head resonance". Around G4 is the point where I completely let go of chest/mouth resonance and enter what I would call "pure head resonance". This is a resonance feeling very close to falsetto where you sense the resonance completely above the soft palate. But twang + additional respiration have to make sure that you don't actually do falsetto.

It is absolutely crucial that you let go of chest/mouth resonance at this point, otherwise you will start to "overcompress", which means quacking.

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Benny, thats it... you get it... Now, get your sirens from "The Four Pillar of Singing" and begin working on coordinating compression, respiration and vowel in a slow and fluid movement.

Also, try the workout, "Bridging & Connecting #2c"... do a dampen & release onset on the first phrase and a wind & release onset on the second phrase... when you go to the wind & release onset, (similar to the point Jens was making), you will be in the open glottis position, but... with strong respiration. Slowly calibrate the larynx dampening and the compression in half a second and you should find a balance.

Let me know how it goes.

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