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How to talk and how to breath

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TheIntimate
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I've read many a time that the way we speak affects the way we sing, but I haven't actually worked out what the actual technique to good speaking actually is - what should I change about the way I speak to improve my singing?

Also, I'm working on the way I breath at the moment, and I'm expanding my belly and ribs - is it a good idea to breath like this throughout the day, trying to keep my ribs expanded for as long as I can before taking another breath?

Thanks a lot for reading.

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I've read many a time that the way we speak affects the way we sing, but I haven't actually worked out what the actual technique to good speaking actually is - what should I change about the way I speak to improve my singing?

Also, I'm working on the way I breath at the moment, and I'm expanding my belly and ribs - is it a good idea to breath like this throughout the day, trying to keep my ribs expanded for as long as I can before taking another breath?

Thanks a lot for reading.

All I know about healthy efficient speaking is it is neither pressed nor airy, sounds more bright rather than woofy, isn't vocal fry, doesn't bombard the vocal folds with air pressure, and is aided by good resonance. All of that is the same in singing too, actually.

For the second part, breathe diaphragmatically but I wouldn't worry too much about the ribs. let the intercostals operate naturally. If you want to work on breathing technique outside of singing, do breathing exercises, or be conscious of your breathing during physical exercise. But dont employ forced respiration anywhere its unnecessary because as far as i know, natural quiet breathing is far more efficient for situations where you don't need a lot of air.

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Here are some common faults. Many people speak either too low or too high than what is natural. For men, it's usually trying to speak lower than the natural center of your voice because you are trying to sound "manly" m "macho", whatever the word is in your culture.

Some cultures have a large amount of nasality in its spoken language, too much to be accepted in singing.

Most people speak on residual pressure from the lungs collapsing, as opposed to a singer controlling the escape of that breath.

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Well it affects, it can tire you easily and you will strain to compensate for it.

However, what would you do about it?

Since a few months ago, I started to warm up everyday, and try to do speaking using more covering and focus. The relief was huge. But it must just a bit, and well, you need to know how to do it.

As it was mentioned, engaging tons of support to speak normally is not a good idea. It can actually become a functional problem shifting the ballance towards the breathing and making the larynx "lazy". Got a friend that is not even a singer and had this outcome.... Its actually the opposite of support to do such, but the important thing is that its not necessary, unless by speaking you mean acting and going loud.

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