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Sing along to your favorite artists. Good or bad?

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I'm interested in this as well! Personally I almost feel like singing along with my favorite songs is better for me than focused practice on scales. I may be wrong though so I'd love to hear thoughts from more experienced people

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I think I've heard Daniel Formica say that he would suggest a song-heavy practice routine... 60/40, 70/30 or whatever works best?

Works for me!

I agree but singing songs and singing along to a recording of your favorite artist is not the same thing.

Nick

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There's nothing wrong with singing along to your favorite artists. In fact if you are trying to emulate the tone or phrasing of an artist it is essential. Not only singing along, but listening carefully to the artist, and then trying the same phrase. I think it is an important part of developing your own style. Our own individual styles are a kind of "melting pot" of styles of our favorite artists.

And it can be very helpful on a technical level. Maybe the artist can sing a certain note that gives you trouble. It helps to try and mimic the vowel shading and weight. I do this all the time.

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When I am working on a song I will listen and sing along to a lot of different artists singing the same song. That way you do not get locked into trying to sound like a certain artist.

Take notice of the different approaches you can use for the same song.

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i just want to say that although it's a great idea and has a lot of merit, you just have to be careful that you exercise good judgement and don't end up hurting yourself in the process...and that it be done in conjunction with consistent vocal exercise.

i say this because you may be lacking in certain skill and development and you could end up slamming your folds together or reaching for notes you aren't yet capable of hitting or sustaining..... or you could get so fixated on getting a certain tone or a certain distortion or rasp that you forget that it may simply be (currently) unavailable to you.

in addition, you may not be in the sweet spot of your voice when you mimic a certain artist. she or she may be comfortable and resonant with a demanding tessitura, but you may not.

also, how you hear it may not actually be how you sing it. it may more or less grueling than it appears.

another issue to watch out for is your tolerance for variance.

i have found that certain singers have tonal characteristics that you can link to others quite nicely and others is it's a total readjustment or a technique variance and that gap is wide.

for example if you are doing steve perry and your next song is nickleback....

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On the impossibility of taking lessons, doing so is probably the best you can do.

I agree.

Which also means even if you are taking lessons, you should be spending some practice time (and later on, the majority of it as dan formica suggests) singing along to your favorite artists so you can practice applying your training to your stylistic vision.

Also I cannot emphasize enough the benefit of writing original songs that are vocally challenging for you. And then practicing them for a year or so as you train. Let your desire to make your voice sing them the way you hear it in your head guide your training.

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I love singing along. I find it a good way to work on different things because of the tendency for a bit of imitation to happen.

For example if I want to practice edge I could just do it, or I could put on early Mike Patton and then I find it very hard not to sing in edge!

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