Jump to content

analyzing singers and how they manage vowels

Rate this topic


VideoHere
 Share

Recommended Posts

just looking at different singers and listening to how they work their vowels...

learning some frampton, so i'm studying him a bit.....i really like the way he worked his vowels....

very underrated singer......reacquainting myself with the cd "frampton comes alive" .....real nice stuff...

he has a really nice "oo" and "ee"

i love the hooty, deep, rich resonance he gets here in the lower head tones.

of late, i really don't think a lot of beginning folks realize the importance of developing the lower head tones

taking notes what would instinctively be sung with the chest voice and train to take them with the head voice as if the head voice were a covering that you placed over the chest voice to sort of nullify it (as frisell says).

get the head voice side really developed than go back and integrate chest...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frampton is known better for this one album than any of his studio albums. Heck, I can't name any of the studio albums.

And it was a landmark for live albums. And, of course, support for my belief that "live" is where it's at. I knew about the vocoder guitar effect from this album before I knew about Ritchie Sambora using it. Back in the day when being able to sing while playing an instrument was cool.

This song is not at the highest or lowest end of a singing range. And it is still in the range of most people, trained or not. Which made it a great sing-along. Which also helps albums sales, as it is likely to be played at least once at any party in the late 70's and early 80's. Stoners,. jocks, punks, everyone enjoyed this song.

Anyway, he showed good technique. And, today, aprroximately the same age as you, Bob, he can still do this song. And that is cool.

So, how do other singers handle vowels? And what do we admire about that? I mean, anyone that has been in this forum for more than a few months is likely to learn that you are a big fan of Lou Gramm.

Let me poke fun at myself. Though I do not consciously pattern myself after any particular singer or, at least, like to think so, why are at least half of my sound files covers of Led Zep songs? :lol:

I have noticed that some singers often rest on a vowel that is bright for them. For example, it seems like Dennis DeYoung ends on ee, a lot. Kevin Cronin has a mailbox at the eh sound.

And, to me, it seemed like Robert Plant spent a lot of time with ah. Although, in later years, I think he shifted to ee. Especially during his solo career, as well as his duet with Allison Kraus.

Clothes make the man, vowels make the formant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just looking at different singers and listening to how they work their vowels...

learning some frampton, so i'm studying him a bit.....i really like the way he worked his vowels....

very underrated singer......reacquainting myself with the cd "frampton comes alive" .....real nice stuff...

he has a really nice "oo" and "ee"

i love the hooty, deep, rich resonance he gets here in the lower head tones.

of late, i really don't think a lot of beginning folks realize the importance of developing the lower head tones

taking notes what would instinctively be sung with the chest voice and train to take them with the head voice as if the head voice were a covering that you placed over the chest voice to sort of nullify it (as frisell says).

get the head voice side really developed than go back and integrate chest...

I know Rob and 4 Pillars mention how the low head tones are the hardest to sing, so there's a good deal of instruction in there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...