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Singing from "the mask" equals "singing from the throat"?

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yuutokun
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Hello everyone.

I'm currently a vocalist for a small hardcorish band in Japan.

When I first joined, I couldn't sing for crap (Here's a demo to show how I used to sing http://www.audioleaf.com/w-t-e/. An analysis of my problems in the past may still be helpful now)

However, after time I came slightly more decent as I experimented with different techniques and whatnot I found online. But until recently I still just felt like I was not about to get the power,tone, or emotion I wanted. It felt like something was holding my voice back. A few months ago, I watched a video on youtube that really started to make things quick and made me realize I had been approaching things the wrong way

In the past I did my best to aim for "the mask" as it were but when I did that I always felt like something was holding my voice back. It wasn't until I started to aim the sound at the area under my larynx and down to the V in my neck that I was able to sing with less effort/ more power and in a fuller voice. It also nearly doubled my range and weirdest of all, when I put my hand near my sinuses, I feel them resonating. Can do a live gig with singing high and screaming for 3o minutes without my voice wearing out too. There is absolutely no feeling of aiming for the mask though. Indeed, I "aim" for the space under my larynx as I previously mentioned.

Given the explanation and the sensations I've given, can anyone tell physically what it is I may be doing?

I know it must be some kind of compression or something. I can even push it to be more metallic almost Guns and Rosesish at times, though I tend to avoid that sound.

I'll get some live samples up soon enough to demonstrate.

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Just to describe it technically: What you are doing now is "placing the sound in the mask" correctly. You were just doing it wrong before. "Placement in the mask" doesn't mean that you aim for the mask, you just put the resonance there. You "aim" for projection towards some point in the distance. Thinking "through the area below your larynx" can achieve exactly that. At the same time this places the resonance in the mask.

There is a difference between resonance (placement) and projection that is very important when singing. Projection is basically where you "aim" towards, placement is where your "resonate".

The fact that you can feel the sound resonating in your sinuses actually means that you are placing the sound in the mask.

However, when you aim for the mask you will usually place the sound in your throat (as you did before).

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I believe it's like this;

Feeling the resonance in a certain place, or "placing the sound" is a consequence of vocal tract adjustment.

In other words, you are going to f.ex. feel head resonance on high notes when you are doing things right, it's not something you can actively do. However sometimes imagining that you are "placing the sound" somewhere will change your vocal tract which may help you achieve proper resonance.

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I believe it's like this;

Feeling the resonance in a certain place, or "placing the sound" is a consequence of vocal tract adjustment.

In other words, you are going to f.ex. feel head resonance on high notes when you are doing things right, it's not something you can actively do. However sometimes imagining that you are "placing the sound" somewhere will change your vocal tract which may help you achieve proper resonance.

Yes, I think it works exactly that way. Of course the placement is the result. But in singing it has become practical in many cases to use that result and condition the own mind to work on the result as a trigger, so thinking of head resonance puts your vocal tract in the correct shape. It's kind of a regulation circle.

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Aiming the sound under your larynx may be helping you to keep the larynx from rising when you sing higher pitches.

The problem with us using "Feelings" to describe how to do things is that we all have different ways to describe sensations. And different sensations can cause different results from one person to another.

We cannot see what is going on in our body and we cannot feel the actual muscles that we are using. The only way we can try to describe what is happening is from the sound itself or the different vibrations that we can feel in our bodies.

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We cannot see what is going on in our body and we cannot feel the actual muscles that we are using. The only way we can try to describe what is happening is from the sound itself or the different vibrations that we can feel in our bodies.

Yes, that's probably the main reason why we have to learn singing using "sounds and sensations", because there is hardly an direct feedback from the muscles around your larynx, especially the small ones that have a big influence on the singing process.

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