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Well that's because he is concentrating solely on the technique. The iniital hoo exercise is without any attention to any pitch and yes, the primary vowel sound is oo but more important is the prominence it gives to head voice controls.

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I somehow have my doubts about that (maybe wrong of course):

The coordination he uses for anything above F#4 is falsetto to my ears (not head voice). It is loud and supported, but still falsetto (or Neutral in CVT terms). He also states it himself and also puts it in the comments section that it is not full voice.

Then there is this:

In all honesty a Bb4 should by all rights be completely out of my range and I would probably never actually use it in a performance.

And that:

If I were to actually attempt that note (Bb4) in a completely full voice I would only succeed in helping a surgeon pay for a new car for his wife when he billed me for reconstructing my vocal cords

Doesn't really sound like a desirable coordination for the high range to me. From what I hear his larynx is too low on the high notes and his weight is too light considering the high amount of air pressure he uses. Falsetto goes better with lower air pressure (like countertenors do it). For a powerful sound with high air pressure he should use Edge or Overdrive over Neutral on the high notes and engage more muscle.

On this I'm pretty much with Kevin Richards that it will do you no good if you go too light mass on high notes while singing with almost "belty" air pressure. But that's just my opinion.

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benny, this is all about strengthening head voice. his videos are good, but basic stuff.

Yes, that's probably the reason. Kind of an intermediate coordination, like the lift up & pull back in TVS (which is also falsetto).

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I'm pretty adamantly in the camp of not using falsetto as a means to reach fully adducted head/mixed voice, at least not for complete beginners. I do think that it's useful for intermediate and advanced singers who are able to reach at least some notes after their break without straining, but want to do so with less effort.

However I will say that this is the first video using the falsetto method I've encountered, where I feel like if I'd practiced the exercise for a while, I might have eventually learned how to achieve an adducted tone on the high notes. Most videos claim that the way you "blend" is to sing fully adducted but really quietly until your break and then sing really loudly in falsetto after the break so that people won't notice you broke. Trust me, they notice.

His third video at least deals with the inescapable fact that head/mix is not found by singing in falsetto as loudly as you can.

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i just think top down vocalizing is very helpful.

I think so, too. But maybe for a different reason than some. Because the control must become before the volume that one can add later. Volume is an illusion. You don't get volume by using every muscle in your body to its physical limit. You get volume by using muscle wisely.

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"His third video at least deals with the inescapable fact that head/mix is not found by singing in falsetto as loudly as you can."

True, although singing in falsetto (strengthening it) has made the mix in my upper range more accessible and sort of lifted my voice higher. In fact it was Bob who once said on this forum that one has to "break through" or "pierce through" the "wall" when swelling a note from falsetto into mix. Not his exact words, but the idea was this. The chest voice has to kick in too eventually in order to enter the "performing voice".

I start my voice every day by doing pure falsetto throughout all my range, and then as the day moves on I add more weight while keeping that falsetto placement and keeping the falsetto engaged.

This is how I try to train and develop my voice, I'm definitely following the Frisell method :)

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I start out every day singing along with songs I like in headvoice, bringing in more and more resonance as I get warmed up. I have a monster playlist that I use for this, and I also hit some other songs if I feel like it. It has made singing so much easier, and has improved my pitch tenfold. Here's what is currently on that list. Sometimes I put it on shuffle, sometimes I go by artist, sometimes I go in order of plays... keeps it interesting.

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When I warm up in head voice I basically put on Queensryche and sing along ;) I agree that top-down sliding is very useful. I also agree that falsetto is a useful tool to access head resonance.

I was just saying that what is done in the video seems like an undesirable coordination, because he uses a lot of support, but his larynx is too low to allow for full compression. An indication of that is also that he only opens his mouth in a vertical way. But even as a classical singer you have to spread (smile) quite a bit and lift the larynx to sing the notes above F4. The larynx position he uses will most probably make you crack around C5 or at least make it very intensive on your larynx. Around E5 it will most probably drive you into a totally airy falsetto or even flageolet.

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"His third video at least deals with the inescapable fact that head/mix is not found by singing in falsetto as loudly as you can."

True, although singing in falsetto (strengthening it) has made the mix in my upper range more accessible and sort of lifted my voice higher. In fact it was Bob who once said on this forum that one has to "break through" or "pierce through" the "wall" when swelling a note from falsetto into mix. Not his exact words, but the idea was this. The chest voice has to kick in too eventually in order to enter the "performing voice".

I start my voice every day by doing pure falsetto throughout all my range, and then as the day moves on I add more weight while keeping that falsetto placement and keeping the falsetto engaged.

This is how I try to train and develop my voice, I'm definitely following the Frisell method :)

Like I said, I think it's a useful thing for singers who already have some head/middle voice coordination. Breaking through the falsetto to just the other side of falsetto is a lot easier when you have some sense of what that feels like. Beginners don't have that. They have falsetto and they have chest voice which is strenuous on the high notes.

My 2 cents is that it's much quicker to teach a beginner how to find that head/mix coordination with crying exercises and NG sirens. My teacher had me producing mixed/head tones in the first lesson that way and instantly I had a sense of the coordination I was looking for. Doesn't mean I was instantly a good singer, but I had a place to build from rather than spending so much time trying to discover something to build on.

Again, I think falsetto is great for building agility once you can already sing some high notes fully adducted. As Dan often discusses, it's a great way to figure out where to 'place' a high note.

Not to knock Frissell and those who follow him. It's entirely possible that his top-down approach does ultimately yield better results for classical singers than crying and NG sirens do. But for my purposes it seems like all it's doing is making the student wait months or years to discover something that could be discovered in days or weeks.

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Again, I think falsetto is great for building agility once you can already sing some high notes fully adducted. As Dan often discusses, it's a great way to figure out where to 'place' a high note.

Yep. To me this is the main use of it too.

Not to knock Frissell and those who follow him. It's entirely possible that his top-down approach does ultimately yield better results for classical singers than crying and NG sirens do. But for my purposes it seems like all it's doing is making the student wait months or years to discover something that could be discovered in days or weeks.

I still think that Frisell's approach is a little bit different than that. And also his top-down slides are very useful to 'feel' what it is like when you tilt on lower notes, which helps a good deal to get that cry going that will ultimately mix your chest and head.

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The funny thing is if you do your homework and open your mind you will find sls, frissels, who ever makes up a method etc. it's all the same when you dig deep. The voice doesn't do a whole lot when it comes to making sounds its how you regulate air and how the cords adduct in the area that is tough for some people it's a balancing act. There are plenty of people that use falsetto as a tool and plenty of people that don't its what works best for you. I use it all hit it from all directions and you can't miss the target

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The funny thing is if you do your homework and open your mind you will find sls, frissels, who ever makes up a method etc. it's all the same when you dig deep. The voice doesn't do a whole lot when it comes to making sounds its how you regulate air and how the cords adduct in the area that is tough for some people it's a balancing act. There are plenty of people that use falsetto as a tool and plenty of people that don't its what works best for you. I use it all hit it from all directions and you can't miss the target

You're right and I'm basing this off of my own personal experience. It's just that I spent 8 years singing with plenty of falsetto use and never got a single bit closer to the elusive middle/head register than I was the first day I started singing. Approaching it in a different way made it click for me very quickly.

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There are plenty of people that use falsetto as a tool and plenty of people that don't its what works best for you. I use it all hit it from all directions and you can't miss the target

Makes a lot of sense. To go north east you can go north then east or east then north. But depending on how each individual likes to travel, one way might work better.

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for me, bringing down head voice and staying in that heady configuration really thickened my lower head tones and enables me to produce low notes from a heady setup (up and out of the throat) instead of dropping down into the throat like I used to do and dig my way out....

the support stabilizes things, i have more head voice in my entire voice than ever before and my chest voice told me he's happier...lol!!!

it helped with my embrosure or whatever the hell you call it...lol!!!

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Took me years to find my head voice. I'd still like a chestier tone somewhat, but am currently thinking that might not be realistic or healthy. I'm pretty happy with what I have now, especially when I add some distortion on top, I think it sounds pretty good.

Anyway, I found it by listening to alot of Dream Theater and Skid Row. At first, I could only attain what I would call "falsetto with the chords together." Not breathy, but a thinner, shriller tone. I eventually found head voice by basically opening that sound up. I'll get a big wide spread mouth and aim the tone up and back behind my ears.

I remember as I was developing it that I must have been blowing a ton of air pressure trying to get there, and once I reduced my volume a bit, things became a bit easier. The whole "not to much not to little" rule really applies here.

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I think it depends a whole lot on how you use falsetto. I also used falsetto a lot when I started to just sing and it didn't improve my head voice, because just singing in falsetto will usually not improve head voice.

The key when using falsetto is really to use it on sirens (ascending and descending), because what it gives is the placement. When you do falsetto on a very high notes the resonant placement will usually be "in your face" or at the root of your nose. When you slide down the falsetto it will go down towards the soft palate and then pretty much reveal the place "between your ears" to you that Simon mentioned. This place is sometimes also called "the pocket".

At exactly that place your chest voice and head voice will connect smoothly. It is kind of the placement of "mixed" resonance. And the goal of falsetto excercises is usually to find that place.

There are two versions of finding this place:

1. lift up & pull back (ascending)

2. frisell method (descending)

There is one very common case which will lead to falsetto not giving you any benefit and this is exactly what I did in the beginning, too:

As a beginner you will often "do what you can" and that is you sing chest up to like F4/G4 and then falsetto from A4 to the top. But the really really important factor that will develop your head voice is that you use falsetto lower than that. The frisell excercise really enforces that. On the lift up & pull back excercise it is especially important to pull back which will ensure that you go into falsetto early and not late.

Using falsetto in the G4-G5 area will do nothing for your head voice strengthening, using falsetto in the F3-F4 area will. Because this will give you the "placement" you have to use to carry your chest voice up through the F3-F4 area while shedding weight. And exactly that shedding of weight will then enable you to carry some chest voice strength higher towards the G4-G5 area.

If you don't use that placement you will usually carry too much weight up to G4 and then flip into falsetto with no chance to carry any chest elements upwards.

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