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Thought I had resonance, but didnt. Steps to achieve resonance?

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nariza77
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So I like to sing a lot, but when I record myself, it sounds very rough. Kind of like all chest voice. What sounds like resonance to me at times is just air going out through my nose(somewhat nasal I guess).

How I tried to achieve resonance was by plugging my nose with my fingers so that air doesnt escape, except for certain vowels/consonant sounds such as "m" and "ng". When I did this, the only way I could continue to sing was for me to sing through my chest voice. I think this is where I mess up though. Correct me if I'm wrong, but correct resonance should result in no loss of air through the nose besides some of the "m", "ng", and other particular sounds right? How do I achieve this kind of resonance with no air escaping through the nose(besides the "m", "ng", etc) and for me to not use my throat/chest voice. I am breathing through my stomach/diaphragm(or so I think).

For those who know they have resonance, can you explain how the air flows(like describing a diagram) so that I can picture it visually in my mind how resonance should work? I hear ppl say that the air should hit the area near the front teeth, and that when you hum, the tingling feeling should be on your lips. Not sure how to apply this to resonance since I am not getting resonance from either attempts.

Thank you

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The "ng" should actually help you in finding the resonance you're looking for. My teacher had my singing scales starting on an "ng" to make the sound a bit more nasal. A pleasant note will have a mix of this nasal resonance and the darker chestier sound (how much of each will depend on where you are in your range). Don't be afraid to go overboard with the nasality at first though - you can always reign it back later! :D

Also, are you sure you're fully supporting? When you are singing a phrase the feeling in your lower ribcage, back, and abdominals should be like slowly exhaling on an "ssssss" sound. Give it a try and see if that's what you're actually doing. If you're not properly supporting, that resonance will prove elusive.

It's hard to diagnose without hearing or seeing your form, but another common perpetrator in muting the voice and blocking the resonance is the tongue. Make sure you're not pulling it back into your throat. Even with all my training over the years, I've noticed I do it as a reflex sometimes. Try to keep the tongue forward and slightly curved, with the tip of it touching the back of the bottom incisors and do some basic "eee"s on a basic 1,2,3,2,1 scale (e.g. c,d,e,d,c). Good luck! Just be warned, once you find it, that buzzing feeling gets to be addicting! :D

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ohh thank you haha. I'm quite sure I am struggling with support. My tongue also does move up and down a lot when I sing. I'll start from there then. I hope I eventually find that buzzing feeling!

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Not a problem! Yeah, learning support has to come before everything! Of course, for some it just comes naturally and they don't have to think about it (and eventually you won't have to either) but I did read an interview with some famous opera singer (wish I could remember who it was) who said that he did nothing but breathing exercises for months and months before he moved onto actually singing. That's an extreme case, haha, but it does testify to the importance of breathe control.

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For those who know they have resonance, can you explain how the air flows(like describing a diagram) so that I can picture it visually in my mind how resonance should work?

Thank you

The note is a "ball" at the juncture of the soft and hard palate, whether it actually "happens" there or not. Keep your eye on the ball. It can move back a little but don't let it move forward from that point.

A good way to find that spot? An aspirated "h" sound with mid tongue.

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