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Some questions about Head voice and excercise crique

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compiled1988
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I'm trying to find hed voice and I'd like some feedback. I'd also like to ask if some of the things I heard about head voice are true.

I heard that if you can do lip rolls then your accessing head voice because in order to do them you have to use head voice. Is this true?. My lip rolls seem to be ok.

I've also heard that using any 'n' or 'g' will guarantee vocal chord closure and head voice. Here is the Nay Nay excercise. Is this head or falsetto

I've also tried the dopey Mum Mum Mum excercise and the Wee Wee Wee excercise. There doesn't seem to be any breaks so is that head or just a connected falsetto.

Anyone have any advce?

Thanks

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Sounds like head to me.

As far as lip rolls being head, not sure about that. I haven't heard that n and g guarantee closure.

Now that you know you are accessing head correctly you could try some octave sirens (like your lip rolls) on "ng" and then some open vowels.

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Yes, I think it's true. Consonants like "B", "N" or "G" pretty much guarantee closure on the following vowel unless you add something like an "h" in between.

There is no thing as a "connected falsetto". If it connects, it is head voice.

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Yes, I think it's true. Consonants like "B", "N" or "G" pretty much guarantee closure on the following vowel unless you add something like an "h" in between.

There is no thing as a "connected falsetto". If it connects, it is head voice.

So is it even possible to do falsetto on those consonants?

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The hard consonances (b,g, act) induce a glottal attack. I found that the beat way for me to stay "adducted" was to use "gug". Even tthough your attack (onset) induces full adduction, does not mean you will stay adducted after the onset.

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So is it even possible to do falsetto on those consonants?

Yes of course, but it actually takes effort to do so. My personal trick is to think an "h" before the vowels. So if it is "BA", then I sing "BA" but I think "BHHHHHA".

But for most people the "natural reflex" is to have full adduction following a hard consonant.

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How does one measure full adduction? By sound? And if falsetto is minimal adduction (and it is still some adduction or something vibrating or you would not hear a pitch) then how does one measure "partial" adduction?

I am just a caveman singer. Years ago, your scientists thawed me out of a glacier ....

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