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MDEW
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Feuchtinger may have put too much importance on this but it has its place and is used by other programs just not pointed out in this manner.

Yep. That's what I've been saying all the time.

try this, pick a song that is above the passage, sing it closing your nostrils with your finger.

First make it nasal, then slowly lower it until its all oral, take a look on the mirror what happens to your tongue and notice how your soft palate feels...

Focus... There is value

That's exactly the way it feels for me. It is intrinsic anchoring, which just means, using twang and a dampened larynx at the same time. The soft palate usually rises and tenses in the process, too.

The actual question to judge Feuchtingers stuff, though is: "Is it really true that most people have to develop the strength to do that first?". If that's true, working on those muscles in a very dedicated way at first may indeed at least speed up the process of learning to sing.

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Yep. That's what I've been saying all the time.

That's exactly the way it feels for me. It is intrinsic anchoring, which just means, using twang and a dampened larynx at the same time. The soft palate usually rises and tenses in the process, too.

The actual question to judge Feuchtingers stuff, though is: "Is it really true that most people have to develop the strength to do that first?". If that's true, working on those muscles in a very dedicated way at first may indeed at least speed up the process of learning to sing.

Good point. I think the different vocal training approaches work towards the same goals. But which one delivers the fastest, most effective way? And maybe it's different depending on the individual.

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benny curiously I had a conversation about this. Two persons that are involved with research on it say opposite things, one say that there is indeed muscular hypertrophy involved, the other, that its mainly coordination... Both share the view that while emission and resonance are not working it can be detrimental to address it (although it can work on some individuals), and that the work must be gradual to keep the efficiency as high as possible.

So in the end its the maintenance that will change depending on which one it is.

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So I dug a little deeper into that Feuchtinger stuff and just to answer some of the questions here by referencing it:

1. I was wrong with my assumption that this stuff is about "cuperto", it is not. It is much more about training to sing with higher tension in the vocal folds (more "meat"). It shares really a lot with Ken Tamplins stuff from a technical point of view (it is not by chance that both focus on the AH as a training vowel). He actually takes a slight "bash" at cuperto techniques because, while they develop resonance, they don't develop strength.

2. The groove in the tongue Feuchtinger refers to appears ONLY on the vowel AH (as in "father") to full extent, to a lesser extent on an A as in "fate". Especially EE as in "see" is a vowel where pretty much the opposite of the groove happens (the tongue gets closer to the palate in the back). The groove is associated to "chestiness" and "meat", NOT to the ability to sing high notes with ease. High notes on EE are easy because the larynx is naturally high on EE, high notes on OO are easy because the folds are naturally thin on OO, but both are probably the least "chesty" vowels. The groove in the back is about singing everything in a "chesty" way (again, a little bit like the Ken Tamplin approach).

3. There are three different attacks. They are described from a physiological point of view and are named by the main muscle groups that are activated on purpose.

- The tongue attack (balanced larynx): This attack is presented as the most "natural" and strongest attack with the best sound. It applies to the middle part of the voice and is based on the groove in the tongue, which means it is triggered by tongue muscles. The larynx takes a balanced position in this attack. It causes a sensation of pharynx/palatal resonance.

- The glottal attack (low larynx): This attack is used for the low part of the voice that has to be sung with a lowered larynx position. The attack starts with an activation of the throat musculature which lowers the larynx and is thus called "glottal" or "throat" attack. It causes a sensation of throat/chest resonance.

- The palatal attack (high larynx): This attack is used for the high part of the voice and is used by intentiously activating the palatal musculature, which is also connected to the musculature that raises the larynx. It causes a sensation of palatal/head resonance.

4. The parts of the voice are divided into

- low part

- medium part

- high part

- falsetto/whistle

As a guideline he gives the usual notes for certain fachs

Bass: low: E2-A2, middle: B2-B3, high: C4-F4, falsetto: G4-F5

Tenor: low: B2-E3, middle: F3-F4, high: G4-C5, falsetto: D5-C6

Alto: low: E3-A3, middle: B3-B4, high: C5-F5, falsetto: G5-F6

Soprano: low: B3-E4, middle F4-F5, high G5-C6, falsetto: D6-C7

Of course there are also fachs in between that. From my personal experience it pretty much is very accurate for a bass. The high part is associated with what most programs call "head voice" and is sung within M1 (modal voice) by males and M2 (non-modal) by females.

As a whole it can be said that the Feuchtinger stuff is probably geared towards developing that typical chesty and full tone of dramatic opera singers (like Pavarotti or Caruso). It focuses a lot on "chestiness", which has to be applied by opera singers nowadays as the head tones are expected to be sung in modal voice. It also induces a quite dark sound color (which can be changed to some extent though). Thus, it might apply a little less to contemporary singing.

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No, in all his career. He did those roles near the end as a challenge, but he always said he was a lyric tenor and those are the roles he is most famous for. What those two guys have in common is that they pushed the technical virtuose and quality of performance further. Pavarotti changed how the Aria Ah Mes Amis is performed.

The point is rather simple. Although the tongue needs to be trained, these inferences that it was what Caruso or Pavarotti did are absurd. They were just THAT good as singers, and singing technique does not work in pieces.

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The point is rather simple. Although the tongue needs to be trained, these inferences that it was what Caruso or Pavarotti did are absurd. They were just THAT good as singers, and singing technique does not work in pieces.

Yes, of course. It was just an example of how that exact usage of the tonuge actually sounds. Pavarotti definitely sounds "bigger" than the usual lyric tenor, although he is one. And using a tongue position like this can make the sound bigger. Of course it is just a partial aspect of his excellent technique.

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Benny,

Actually, Pavarotti mainly used what CVT calls a compressed tongue and not the tongue position that Feuchtinger advocates. :)

The position Feuchtinger advocates makes your tongue compress (at least mine). But CVT of course allows for different positions with tongue compression. I am also still not sure whether the muscle activation Feuchtinger wants to achieve can be achieved by other means than what he describes, without using his tongue position. I am quite positive that it is possible.

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