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Holding A Note As Long As Possible For Support

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Overdrive
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It can work Overdrive. Just consider the variables well so that you dont compensate with more compression than necessary on your voice, if you increase the compression, there will be less airflow and you will sustain longer, but because of an increase on the laryngeal resistance, and will leave you on the opposite state of what you want (control the airflow and reduce the laryngeal resistance).

Its not an easy exercise btw, like stacatto or mesa di voce, you can find some ways to produce the sonic result, but only works when done very correctly (and transposed to singing). Thats why people usually go for the sibilance before voicing, its easier to control the ammount of resistance of the S.

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i finally found a video section that explains a truly awesome support building exercise i do.

watch beginning at 15:40 to 19:32. this was one of the best exercises i've ever done to help me. yes, it's opera stuff, but can be applied to any genre when needed.

note, i know a lot of folks will not agree with this level of support development or usage or may find it simply overkill..i'm just offering it out because it's helped me greatly.

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Support is not just the push of air, it is the control of air.

The long note in this, a full measure longer than the original came from a normal breath, not a "oh my god, here it comes, I better fill my lungs to bursting" breath. Just the same amount of breath you might normally take.

"Live Like You were Dying" by Tim McGraw

http://www.box.com/s/bbcfd8fba3d50f25d35f

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To simplify a complex task into an easier exercise, placing the focus on the aspect that needs work. Which in this case is not the sustain time but the control of the air flow necessary to achieve it.

Both on singing or exercises the effectiveness will depend on the quality, awareness, being able to repeat it with a good chance of success and being able to replace previous habits with it.

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folks, you're missing the point of the exercise. it's a tension displacement exercise. the biggest benefit is (when done correctly) is the removal of tension. you basically deflect tension away from the throat down to the lower core where it can be used to power your voice.

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folks, you're missing the point of the exercise. it's a tension displacement exercise. the biggest benefit is (when done correctly) is the removal of tension. you basically deflect tension away from the throat down to the lower core where it can be used to power your voice.

And how do YOU know YOU are doing it correctly:)

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naturally, i can always get better at it, but i have much less tension on high, power notes. i can lean more into the folds without binding up and getting glottal and closed.

i have an easier time of keeping open and free especially during hard belts.

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I listened to that interview, before, in another thread. And I noticed how they also talked about pacing the voice for the performance in the evening. Where are the high notes? How long are they? Essentially, from the wisdom of these ladies, who spent decades in training, there is a limit to the voice and no one should be singing at the very top of their voice's physical limit the entire time, without rest or stop.

I am sure that will be unpopular but oops, there it is. Now, I look forward to others stepping forward to say how even trained opera singers ruined their voices without ever once providing a name and a case history to show this.

Point being, listen to these ladies. And yes, guys, it's okay to learn something from a woman, once in a while.

:D

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