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Raw mix, what do you guys think? :3

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Snejk
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A collaboration with a musician from across the globe. I really liked his instrumental; so I wanted to give it my best shot. I experimented a lot and was surprised to find that I had such a bright timbre that day as well as effortless access to notes well above the ones I struggled with even after a good warm up. I'm confused as to why my voice acted like this, I only experienced this twice over the years I have been singing and I always keep a neutral larynx unless I aim for a rich/thin color.

I'm excited about the final mix, but here's a raw one. As always there are some pitchy moments that I always notice too late. Damn ears -_-

EDIT: Better mix

https://soundcloud.com/archdementh/no-more-of-this

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Hmm, I guess it's because it's the critique section and most critique would be personal opinions on aesthetics rather than technical flaws. I improvised the harmonies and much of the melody line so I always had full control of what I did as opposed to when I butcher Helloween or Sonata Arctica songs where I'm way out of my league and in no control at all xD

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I have not had the opportunity until now to listen. Maybe it is the same with other members.

You do seem to have technical issues straitened out so maybe that is part of the lack of comments.

I really enjoyed listening to this. I also liked what you did with the harmonies.

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Hey MDEW and Validar, thanks for the comments! It's a stray from the heavy metal things I usually do, so it feels good that all the experimentation is not only appreciated by myself (hey, one should be one's biggest fan right?) xD

Some level adjustments in the harmony department and it should be as good as done I think :3

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I've been a little busy, lately.

Really good job. Don't change a thing.

Seriously, copyright it and and register it. In your case, being from Sweden, you would go through SESAC. As in, get it published. Ballads like this are a cross-over hit. Then, in addition to how many sales of your own recording you get, you will receive payment from SESAC without leaving your apartment as everyone from Blake Shelton to Lil Wayne and the Bieber and Sheryl Crow covers it. It's that good of a song. And your singing on it will be the template for others.

And after Sheryl Crow covers it, watch the proliferation of teeny bopper girls doing their own covers on youtube. Minty Arch, a worldwide phenomenon.

Rockonwhichyabadself.

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Damn Ron, that pretty much made my day and most of next week :o When (not if xD) I become the rock star I was born to be, you are half the reason I got there :D

Probably because I listen more as a fan of music than a critic of music. My main thought is, besides how the song makes me feel, would I buy this? And I would. And chances are, so would others. You can work the rest of your life at "perfection," as we all will. But perfection does not sell albums and concerts. How you make fans feel is what comes across. And you have that dripping from every pore.

I have been reading a book about success in the music industry. And the audience can be loosely divided into two sections. The fans of the music, of which there are serious fans and casual fans, and critics. The serious fans are your bread and butter and to some extent, the casual fans, who just want to hear what is popular at a party. Of those two, the serious fan is where you make most of your money. A rule of thumb is that 80% of income comes from 20 % of the effort. The serious fans are the 20%. Concentrate on them and your return increases to 400 %.

Critics, however, want to be the arbiters of taste. They want adulation of their "magnificence" of taste just as much as the most conceited musician may want fawning admiration of his every offering.

As for me, the only technical consideration would really be just pitch accuracy, which you already have, being a pitch-nazi, yourself. Even relevant volume is a matter of artistic taste. Some parts should be sung soft, even falsetto, even in a hard rock or heavy metal song. If it was all rasp all the way all the time, then it becomes just so much sonic noise. Until "Sad Wings of Destiny," Rob Halford was singing everything in the upper 4th and in the 5th octave. And it became just another sonic blast, regardless of being an astounding technical achievement. I think what made British Steel such a smashing success was the change in song-writing, which included a change in how vocal melody lines were approached. He came down out of the clouds and had more lyrics in the range where humans could hear them, not just dogs. And more sing-along, and also more room for emotional inflection. It became more about the song and not just technical virtuosity. Critics might have said, "well, he lost it in British Steel," I would reply, no, I hear nothing but improvement as a musician and a story teller and a performer.

So, you have all the things you need. You just need a way to market your music, which is constantly changing (the market place.) The true challenge, now, is not to worry about signing a record deal. It's about how to get your music to markets that will buy it. You have fans out there. But you have to go to them, bring your music to them.

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Wow thanks a bunch Benny :D If you liked that one, you will probably like the note at 0:30 in this one;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyYTNLtIw88

Tell me what you think :P

Ron; I hear that.. Pitch accuracy is, for me, the most important aspect. The world's very best song is ruined if sung pitchy...

Hopefully I can manage to appeal to people on a larger scale someday...

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