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How to get used to sound of your own voice?

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rurokenji
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Hi guys,

I started taking up singing lessons like sometime last year and i have seen so many results. I believe that i have now found my singing voice. However, i am just having a lil trouble getting used to the sound of my own voice. When i record myself, i sound completely different however when i sing, it sounds completely different from what i recorded. I have heard that techniques such as raising a hand over one ear, will help me to hear exactly what i sound like to others as i am singing. However, i have heard that it may cause pitch problems if used, frequently. Can anyone help me out, please?

Thanks

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Try training with amplification, if possible.

I've been doing the ear cup thing for a while but I'm trying to phase it out for a few reasons. 1. It makes you sound better and sing easier than without it, so you may think you're singing great but you're really not 2. having your hand raised could lead to weird tensions in your upper body that could creep up into the throat 3. you'd never want to be seen doing it in a performance would you? maybe as a last resort but not as a constant habit

So yea, better to just grab a mic and an amp or speaker, if at all possible.

Some other things to try:

Check for nasality. I've found, for me at least, that's the biggest sound difference between what I hear and what the audience hears. I won't hear the nasality, they will. So do the nose pinch test occasionally during open vowel exercises and make sure you don't hear a change of sound. If you do, raising the soft palate is the fix. Search the internet for tips about it and you should be able to figure it out how to do that.

Develop the habit of listening close to the external sound of your voice and tuning out the internal. Listen outside of yourself Listen out into the room, listen to the sound coming back into your ears. Completely ignore that depth of sound that sounds close to you, inside your head. No one will hear that. This is a perspective shift thing. It doesn't totally solve the problem but should make it less extreme.

Just keep in mind. If you have to "get used to" the sound of your own voice on a recording, there could be a couple other issues involved other than what you are mentioning. It could

1. low self esteem distorting how you hear yourself or

2. you actually don't sound that good and that's why it's hard to listen to.

Get someone else's opinion to help you figure out which one it is, but just understand that, when you are both a great singer, and a confident singer, you will probably more often enjoy hearing the sound of your own voice.

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record yourself a lot, you will get familiar. the way I train with the bright timbre and placing of my vowels I can really hear how I sound. it happened over time.

Yeah, i have been constantly recording myself. It's was totally weird at first, hearing myself but slowly i'm getting used to it..

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Try training with amplification, if possible.

I've been doing the ear cup thing for a while but I'm trying to phase it out for a few reasons. 1. It makes you sound better and sing easier than without it, so you may think you're singing great but you're really not 2. having your hand raised could lead to weird tensions in your upper body that could creep up into the throat 3. you'd never want to be seen doing it in a performance would you? maybe as a last resort but not as a constant habit

So yea, better to just grab a mic and an amp or speaker, if at all possible.

Some other things to try:

Check for nasality. I've found, for me at least, that's the biggest sound difference between what I hear and what the audience hears. I won't hear the nasality, they will. So do the nose pinch test occasionally during open vowel exercises and make sure you don't hear a change of sound. If you do, raising the soft palate is the fix. Search the internet for tips about it and you should be able to figure it out how to do that.

Develop the habit of listening close to the external sound of your voice and tuning out the internal. Listen outside of yourself Listen out into the room, listen to the sound coming back into your ears. Completely ignore that depth of sound that sounds close to you, inside your head. No one will hear that. This is a perspective shift thing. It doesn't totally solve the problem but should make it less extreme.

Just keep in mind. If you have to "get used to" the sound of your own voice on a recording, there could be a couple other issues involved other than what you are mentioning. It could

1. low self esteem distorting how you hear yourself or

2. you actually don't sound that good and that's why it's hard to listen to.

Get someone else's opinion to help you figure out which one it is, but just understand that, when you are both a great singer, and a confident singer, you will probably more often enjoy hearing the sound of your own voice.

Thanks for the reply. I didn't quite get what you meant about listen outside of yourself/listen out into the room bit>>.Could you explain it a bit more, please?

Also, i read somewhere on the Internet that singing in a bathroom or small closed space like a toilet perhaps, will allow me to hear my own voice as it will bounce it back to me. What do you think of this ? Any good?

I totally get what you mean about the whole cupping your ear while singing , having possible potential side effects. haha, most great singers love the sound of their own voice?! I wouldn't be suprised ha!

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and i have to disagree with hearing outside the voice and tuning out the internal.

sorry owen, but when you train especially you should be focusing more on your internal sensations and sounds....

get in tune to what you are feeling for example....on lower notes the folds feel located in the larynx, but as the pitch rise you should feel and sense the changes as you ascend. the vocal folds feel like they have relocated to the head, folds shed weight, vowels become less spoken, things like that..

you aren't going to ever hear how you actually sound to an audience unless you record.....but getting a good solid understanding of how you feel and sound internally will benefit you greatly.

it not enough to just sing a high note......you have to get to know intimately what it feels like.

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I'm not talking about how it feels. Of course you should get in touch with the internal feelings. Or even if you hear weird internal resonances or things that seem to signify you're doing well (that you have confirmed through hearing it as a good result on a recording), I don't see anything wrong with listening for that sometimes.

But the idea is, if you want to hear what you really sound like (and to be clear, sometimes you don't and you want to listen for the internal resonances instead), you can get a slightly better idea of what everyone else is hearing by focusing on the sound coming into your ears from the outside. The idea is you can train yourself to listen less to the sound inside your head and listen more to the sound your voice is emitting into the room that is coming back to your ears. This is easier to do in a reverberant room or with amplification because that increases the volume of that outside sound.

If desired you can also do the reverse by plugging your ears, which could be useful for some training situations.

I may be blowing smoke up my ass about this listening outside thing but I'm trying to find a reason for why I sound so similar when I sing to when I hear myself played back on a recording. And I think the answer is, I'm not hearing funky things happening inside my head. I hear my voice as if I just had a pair of ears on my head and the pharynx was mostly disconnected from that so I'm mostly just hearing my voice from the outside in. And I don't doubt that it's probably possible for other singers to train themselves to listen to themselves from that perspective.

I sometimes also wonder if some people maybe just have funky issues with their ears dimensions or eustachian tubes or whatever that make it harder for them to hear from the outside in, and I got lucky and was able to naturally hear the majority of my voice as something coming out of my mouth, into the room, and back to my ears, not through my directly head into my ears.

I wouldn't recommend training in a bathroom or shower, that gets to the point where it's so ringy you're going to think your resonance is great no matter what.

So many times I've thought I had a breakthrough when singing in the shower, only to step out and realize my voice was producing something totally different from the glory I heard in there. So nowadays I generally avoid training in the shower and if I do, it would only be with exercises that don't require attention to resonance.

A larger room, with moderate reverberation, seems to be the optimal training room. Just enough to help you hear yourself well but not enough to make you think you're singing better than you are.

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^ This

I remember hating the way my voice sounded when I started, partially because I sucked and partially because I wasn't used to it.

I love my voice now, but I am completely used to the way it sounds and I don't suck anymore so there you go.

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