Jump to content

Is raspy singing safe?

Rate this topic


Alexander91
 Share

Recommended Posts

Seriously, if you don't push too much, don't clench your throat too much and don't let air go out of your mouth too fast as you do this, it should be fairly safe. If you feel pain in your throat, stop immedially, take a break and later try again with better technique. You should not be hoarse afterwards, unless you're doing it wrong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, even with all the measures taken, its still not 100% safe. The more intense and agressive you are, the more risks you will be exposed to, there is no perfect technique or someone that can execute it 100% perfect all the time.

Its like wanting to be a boxer with a perfect nose. You could if you could win all your fights without getting punched, a perfect technique all the time. But in real life, some will get through, and these will hurt.

Number one thing is to have your technique very well defined, and being able to deliver the songs in a interesting way without the distortion/rasp. Then you add it. If you relly on it as the only way to make the song come decent, you are in trouble.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input.

And yes I think the problem is it's one of the only ways I like the sound of my own voice singing.

So I guess that's not great :/

What about a singer like Ray Lamontagne where it is just completely ingrained into his voice? It must be safe to an extent to do if he's pretty much singing all the time?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just by what i hear from your examples you (might) be letting too much air pass through the folds. if you're too airy it's not good and being too airy and raspy is worse. you are going to dry the folds out and this can make you susceptible to nodes.

drink a lot of water to keep the folds lubed from the inside out.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, even with all the measures taken, its still not 100% safe. The more intense and agressive you are, the more risks you will be exposed to, there is no perfect technique or someone that can execute it 100% perfect all the time.

Its like wanting to be a boxer with a perfect nose. You could if you could win all your fights without getting punched, a perfect technique all the time. But in real life, some will get through, and these will hurt.

Number one thing is to have your technique very well defined, and being able to deliver the songs in a interesting way without the distortion/rasp. Then you add it. If you relly on it as the only way to make the song come decent, you are in trouble.

This applies to the voice in general. Just consider rasp/distortion like running in a slightly faster pace. It wears you out abit faster.

The voice we have is very weird, it's not the rasp/distirtion in itself thats the danger. The danger is it's alot easyer to add to much force/aim the extra energy used to profuce rasp/distortion wrong

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sing with rasp because I think it s my natural way of singing.

But if I can help here:

Too much air, you don't support. I m sure you feel hoarse after two songs. Am I right?

The problem here is not the raspiness of your voice but your singing technique. Even if you were singing with a cleaner voice you would feel tired in 5 minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sing with rasp because I think it s my natural way of singing.

But if I can help here:

Too much air, you don't support. I m sure you feel hoarse after two songs. Am I right?

The problem here is not the raspiness of your voice but your singing technique. Even if you were singing with a cleaner voice you would feel tired in 5 minutes.

Thanks for your thoughts. Yes I do think I use to much breath because I do notice the difference in how I feel after, although it never hurts as all.

But although this isn't my natural way of singing, it does feel very natural if that makes sense?

One question, how do I use less air when singing - I'm using KTVA volume and have not noticed this being mentioned?

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

engage more vocal fold when you sing......try exercises with front consonants....consonants such as "m" and "n"

help. support the voice.

don't let the air pass by the folds too rapidly. these vowel sounds will help engage more fold.

may

nee

muh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, even with all the measures taken, its still not 100% safe. The more intense and agressive you are, the more risks you will be exposed to, there is no perfect technique or someone that can execute it 100% perfect all the time.

Its like wanting to be a boxer with a perfect nose. You could if you could win all your fights without getting punched, a perfect technique all the time. But in real life, some will get through, and these will hurt.

The one thing I'd add is that if you're not the lead singer for a blues or metal band or something that absolutely requires distortion, you can choose to sing cleanly when you know your voice isn't in it's best shape and you may end up pushing. To add to the boxing analogy, you can mitigate the risk by only fighting when you think the odds of winning are very good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My bad i wasnt specific, can you (reffering to anyone who reads) hear someone singing distortion and tell if its correct tecnique? I was thiking about posting a clip because i follow the "rules" for safe distortion such as compression, holding back the air, feel it in the soft pellet but still after 5-10 minutes i start loosing gradually my voice. I am also doing breathing exercises daily and my normal singing voice lasts 20-30 minutes with stuff around g/a4.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Newbie raises a good point. There have been times when we may have stated or thought a singer was straining. How did we determine that? By sound? And if a person has a training system that allows him or her to sing with rasp, is that not a "trainable" effect to give the sound of "strain" while not actually straining?

And, indeed, how does one tell the difference between a "trained" rasp and one that comes from improper technique that may be causing damage? As opposed to someone with a naturally raspy voice, singing as classically as his or her funky vocal mechanism can manage? For me, the latter is the easiest. Listen to any interview with Steven Tyler or Brian Johnson. The exact same tone that you have heard in their singing is present in their speach. In Steven Tyler's own words "Does the noise in my head bother you?", he does warm up. A chromatic scale with each vowel. He does not "practice" rasp. It's just the natural sound of his voice.

Same with Brian. He rattles when he speaks, he rattles when he sings. More interesting would be someone who has a clean speaking voice and a rasp when singing, like David Coverdale.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doesn't sound natural to me. I rasp when the emotional feeling of the song makes me. It's weird, that voice shouldn't be planned beforehand...it should come from your soul. If it damages your voice after that, well at least you went out with heart and passion. The raspy voice comes out, for me, every time I'm really feeling it. Nothing that is planned...just what's needed to convey my emotion to the audience. And to myself.

If that helps,

Reilly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you recognize a "healthy", at least as healthy it gets, distortion from one killing the voice?

From my own experience, a healthy rasp is going to be more on pitch because you're not changing anything with the vocal folds themselves. When I find I'm pushing it a little bitwith the distortion, even before I start to feel anything I can hear that the tone is a bit flat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...