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Vowel modification - from ah to uh?

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haver26
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Hello guys,

I know that Ken Tamplin advocates chaning the "ah" vowel to "uh" when you hit higher notes. Becasue I'm not a native English speaker I don't really understand this subtle change, does it mean to change the "ah" vowel to the same vowel as in the word "God" ?

And by the way, no matter what I do, I can't get to hit G4 without sounding heady, no matter what vowel I attemp to use. Does it mean I just have to practice more and more?

Thanks in advance and sorry for the silly questions

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the "uh" as in the english word "could." the "uh" sound helps to shed vocal weight by bringing in more head voice resonance which allows you up with less difficulty.

can't help you with the g4 till we hear an example. we need to hear how you go about producing a g4.

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It's not as simple as just changing to a different english vowel, you need to hear someone with a similar voice type do it properly and closely imitate their sound in order to nail the exact vowel shades down.

Also if your g4 always sounds heady, vowel modification alone probably won't fix it, you'll need to make some changes to the coordination of the larynx and breath management in order to increase the pressure to engage more vocal fold mass and adduction. Or in Tamplin's terms, you have to add glottal compression

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As Owen said, its not just a matter of modifying.

In a way, you do a certain coordination and allow the vowel to change, expecting how the sound will be. Until you get the coordination down and dont need the reference of course.

Just modifying to sound more like uh is what all the bathroom tenors around the world do :), it wont help much.

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I've found so much freedom modifying AH to OH, UH and OO as it gets higher. Also keeping the mouth open and aiming the sound up into the soft pallet.

It's only ever shades. I try to think of OH as AR. Doesn't make sense I know but it is more covered from my experience and keeps it darker and less splattering.

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d,

modifications can be a very individualized thing...you have to experiment...like for me...i have found that shading towards "oo" (for example) seems like i build in a track or a channel that i go into and send my sound right up to the place and pitch i need with a full sound not too different from a chest sound.

and if i'm off the center of the track, i can tell right away.....it feels unreleased.....

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felipe, why won't it help much?

experimenting with shades of "uh" and "oo" was a big help to me.

I believe you Bob, I say that becuase it depends on the individual and how its done. And, most of all, these short rules of modify to this and that can lead to a deceptive artifical perception of quality. As in "I modified to uh, so it sounds good", which is false.

If you pass correctly, the modification will have to happen. Awareness of the change is good so that you dont fight it, of course, but it should not be something like thinking on another vowel..

Finaly, we dont know that it is what is necessary on HIS case. Covering is necessary, yes, but some people actually need to let go of it and open in order to relax. I actually meet more people in this condition than in the "not covered/splatted" stated. Sometimes, its just a matter of relaxing the articulation, or bringing it a bit more forward. Sometimes its not a good idea even to worry about passage before other matters are settled.

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I've found so much freedom modifying AH to OH, UH and OO as it gets higher. Also keeping the mouth open and aiming the sound up into the soft pallet.

It's only ever shades. I try to think of OH as AR. Doesn't make sense I know but it is more covered from my experience and keeps it darker and less splattering.

You know D.starr you may have a point with this R thing. I'm beginning to think that going for a slightly more r-ish sound without actually pulling back the tongue might encourage the throat shape necesarry to acheive that nice dark head resonance.

Sounds strange but based on what I know about formants, it kinda makes sense. Ill have to test it out more to see if it actually works in practice though.

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