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Matt Mulholland explains falsetto

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Remylebeau
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IDK, I am going to have to watch a few more times to pick up on the subtle shift he was talking about. I know it's there, somewhere, I am just needing to tune my hearing to have more finesse in small differences of tonality and perceived volume.

:lol:

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Shift in pitch is not shift between registration at least not between chest voice and falsetto. I know this is supposed to be a joke but a better joke would have been to sing all high notes and switch between full voice and falsetto with no perceived difference for in this instance he seemed to be singing connected fully vibrating head notes not the tone generally assosiated with falsetto. :/

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Shift in pitch is not shift between registration at least not between chest voice and falsetto. I know this is supposed to be a joke but a better joke would have been to sing all high notes and switch between full voice and falsetto with no perceived difference for in this instance he seemed to be singing connected fully vibrating head notes not the tone generally assosiated with falsetto. :/

It is the tone generally associated with falsetto.

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MDEW, the vast majority of that high octave is between E5 and Bb5. Falsetto has a pretty nice ring to it when you take it that high. It's still kind of a squeaky cartoonish sound, though, different than what you'd hear from a skilled rock singer doing fully connected "screams" in that range. Still, I couldn't carry my falsetto that high to save my life so it's pretty damn impressive.

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My understanding of falsetto is still different from others on this board. Falsetto in my own opinion is the lack of cord closure, too much air pressure to keep a connection. Yes it is thin fold vibration but disconnected. Just as It cannot connect to "Chest voice", "Full voice" or anything else you want to call M1 it also will not go beyond a certain point in the higher range. A connected headvoice can be taken higher than Falsetto. It is the DISCONNECTED quality that gives the name "Falsetto". A Bb5 would not be possible with a FALSETTO coordination.

I know that others have the opinion that Falsetto and flageolet are the same coordination but I do not agree with that. The main problem is and will always be that different schools of vocal pedagogy will place falsetto with differing definitions. To me it is the disconnected quality that sets it apart. Therefore any connected sound cannot be Falsetto.

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http://chanteur.net/contribu/index.htm#http://chanteur.net/contribu/cLHfalse.htm

All Falsetto may be m2 but all M2 is not falsetto. Adducted or not is the issue. If it is adducted ,It cannot be falsetto.

I really did not mean for my comment to turn into a debate, It is only my opinion and I have stated why I have that opinion. No disrespect intended to any one. I respect your opinion also. Mine is just different.

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lol mdew, no disrespect taken, Im just trying to say that the name assigned is not the matter, its the change of quality.

When someone is listenning to you singing, they will not rationalize (hey, the quality changed totally, but there was no break, so I hear it as his normal voice being used). Listenners, specially people not involved with music, will notice the difference, its huge actually.

There is a video from Daniel, where he asks his wife about registers, another awesome resource to clarify all this, notice what she says when he demonstrates "pure head voice". :)

If we say that it is head voice, great, then we need something else to sing on the middle, or our repertoire will be very restricted.

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Daniel,

I've actually been thinking about the yodel over the years and I've realized there are two ways people can yodel. One way is to yodel into an airy falsetto sound, which feels like a total, complete disconnection. Another way is to yodel into a non-breathy sound, which still gives the yodel effect, but it doesn't feel like it disconnects as much as the first one. You can also get much more fine-tuned control over the second one.

Have you noticed anything similar?

~~Dante~~

I have noticed something similar I think.

It's weird because I have found two falsetto configurations in my voice and they are COMPLETELY different in feel and sound

The first one sounds a bit like most people's falsetto but it feels a bit more connected to me and it would be almost a little hard to yodel with. As if I'm hanging on to a tad of TA activity or something. Probably the equivalent of the second one you mentioned.

The second one (maybe the equivalent of your first one) is really bizarre and sounds more like Matt's falsetto when taken up that high...there is no option but to push a lot of air and go very loud and it connects naturally as a result. It sounds more bright and feminine, naturally resonant, feels like nothing in the throat, I can't even correctly produce consonants like b, d, and g with it because the vocalis or medial compression just isn't there, it seems like when it connects up high it's all twang/interarytenoid. But as you take it lower and lower it gets very very weak and it stays exactly like that, impossible to rediscover any kind of connection to a full voice, it's impossible to get it back without flipping.

I'm not convinced the second one is healthy, it seems to blow out my voice a bit because it takes so much air if I take it up high and it's quite unreliable and awful sounding sometimes, there's even a break within it around F5 but that didn't used to always be there till after my voice change? There's basically no dynamic control, it's tiny and airy on low notes, freakishly loud and twangy on high ones, no ability to bridge into any kind of full voice, so I almost never use it in singing...

But I can't figure out for the life of me why that second one is so bizarre and feels like a totally separate voice with no relation to the other one whatsoever.

I think some of the Estill terminology might do an okay job explaining it, the thing about raised vocal fold plane vs. horizontal and stiff vs. slack might have something to do with the difference. But it's a total black and white thing. I can kind of err the first, normal falsetto to have slightly more quality similar to the second, but the second one won't budge. Wasted a lot of time training it in my first few years singing only to realize it was the wrong configuration to attempt to bridge with

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its so high we don't need to discuss it i was talking about the high singing in the beginning. but does he let go when he goes that high no he does it without ever letting go even up there of course its all head resonance but he still has a connection to his body.

dante i avoid these debates usual because of this kind of haggling. Call it whatever i guess and ill sing it…:)

falsetto is falsetto how strong you make it is your choice … I guess :|

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Well now I think would be an excellent time to discuss this clip of Sam Smith singing "Lay Me Down".

At 0:58 on "your", that sounds like a complete and total letting go into falsetto. A true yodel. But the little motif on OO at 1:03-1:06 sounds like he goes into a less disconnected sound. Throughout the song, sometimes he does that little motif more breathy or less breathy, but it still doesn't sound like it totally disconnects like that "your". And then the "you're" at 1:14 -- I have no idea what that one is, but he does it well! I'm thinking a non-breathy falsetto, but not sure. And what about "crazy" at 2:03? Would you call that falsetto, Daniel?

~~Dante~~

The first "Your" that you mentioned sounded like he slipped into falsetto. The "Your at 1:14 was connected head, you do not get that kind of dynamic control with falsetto. It sounds too clean also.

The OOs that he does starts connected slips into falsetto and ends with connected head at the top. You can hear the different sounds as he is singing them. I also think the crazy at 2:03 was falsetto. (second half of Cra-ZAY)

I liked the way he sang this.

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Oh no what I'm talking about is not a dark sound at all, I'm talking super bright and feminine actually. Much like the singer in the first post

The rest of your description does seem pretty spot on although it's important to point out when I take this up high/loud it's no longer airy, sound wise, it's just a lot of air being converted into sound, but the lower and softer I go the harder it is to maintain that twangy compression, but not impossible. But there is NO way to get any kind of chesty compression into it, ever.

I almost suspect it's JUST the interarytenoids doing the work, which doesn't quite make sense, but it's like, the kind of compression that brings out the bright frequencies is there and if given enough air pressure below it, the closure will kind of seal up (bernoulli effect? at least the sensation) and the sound won't be airy anymore, but the kind of compression that you can really FEEL as a source of stability is not and completely inaccessible in the falsetto configuration I'm talking about

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