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What would you classify my range as?

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thematrixiam
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Classification doesn't matter unless you're singing classical. And there too baritones can become tenors and visa versa. If you can only sing to an F2 probably counts you out of being a bass.

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First of all, classification doesn't matter.

That being said, allow me to contradict myself :lol:

Haha no it really is true that it doesn't matter MUCH unless you are a classical singer or untrained and have to know what you are limited to AT THE MOMENT (there is always room for expansion). I just feel I can you give some insight as to an approximate range, it's good to know just don't get hung up on it.

If it's all in 100% full voice no mixing (you'll know this because the C#5 will feel like the heaviest part of your voice) then low tenor would be a fair approximate. The classical tenor range is C3-C5 so and baritone is more like F2-F4 so you'd be in between but closer to tenor.

If you are using mixed voice or head voice (where the C#5 feels different than your full heavy speaking/shouting voice) then with the low note being F2 chances are you're a baritone or high baritone.

It gets pretty complicated you know...I have over three octaves from F2 to G#5 or so if I blend chest and head registers, but in I stay in my full big chest voice belting, that tops out at A4 on a good day. So versatile contemporary singers really kind of have two ranges they work with. Yet people unanimously perceive me as a baritone because I have a good low range and I use that bigger full voice more commonly at the moment while the mix isn't perfected yet. But fast forward a few years and I may sing something and get people thinking I'm a lyric tenor but then still others will still be able to hear I'm naturally a baritone. The voice is very versatile, yet you never lose your natural identity, but sometimes it's hard to put a name on that.

It's all kinda blah blah blah. Just train with a great teacher and you'll be singing whatever and however you want in a few years time

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Well from that clip you sound at this moment like a natural baritone, but certainly don't let that define you.

You realize B2 is higher than D#2 (the low singing note you found), right? The octave numbers start at C and end at B. Other than that, yeah, it's pretty normal for dudes to speak in the low-mid part of their "chest voice" register. It's a habit we start developing in middle school or earlier.

Tuners are okay, but they can be hard to interpret under some circumstances (noise or pitches with strong overtones). Matching pitch from an instrument or pitch pipe is more reliable. There are some good pitch pipe apps out there (and full keyboard apps for that matter).

Don't worry about what it sounds like. Don't be afraid to make some awful noise, just like learning any instrument. As long as you're not hurting yourself, that is.

The sirens should be done at a lighter volume, backing off and lightening up until you can smoothly cross the break.

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I have the real answer, it just took me a while to get to this thread.

Your range is "goosenfrabe." This allows you to sing whatever you want, providing you work at it. I have heard low baritones sing my range. And it doesn't matter what your range is, outside of an opera casting director. What matters is if the audience likes what you did. So, rather than worrying about trying to place yourself or wear the badge of "baritone" or "tenor," learn from a teacher or whatever how to sing the notes you want to sing and then make a neat recording of it.

:P

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It would be interesting to see a goosenfrabe choir. Everyone would keep switching parts. :P

Seriously though, I do like the sound texture of parts crossing, like for example a low female lead with a higher male harmony. It's more common in folk and trad country than in other genres.

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goosenfrabe? Is that spelled correctly. I try to look it up and can only find references to Anger Management, and Eskimos.

Haha! From what I've gathered, ronws is the original, but not the only one. But I'm sure he'll chime in eventually and enlighten you further. :D

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