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Morning Range Adduction

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Hey everyone,

Usually in the morning with a bit of adduction exercises - very basic VFE (vocal function exercises). Like a 3-tone ae-ae-ae to legato and slowly going up the scale, later to an AW or IH. Early in the morning I hit an A5 (squeaked) in falsetto.

As the day continues on and I practice more my adduction actually DECREASES and in falsetto I can BARELY hit a C5.

Why is it that my adducton "decreases" throughout the day. Ofcourse it is lack of vocal technique but how can I re-inforce the adduction that I need in my singing. It's like when I practice the basic adduction exercise for a few minutes I'm great and then I start singing or working some other exercise and the "airyness" comes back worse.

Note: Yesterday through VFE for a split second I was able to sing an A4 in what felt like a pure chest voice. If it helps my voice has always been a bit "leaky" and I've never had a vocal fry. Also have a bad habit of "softening" up the chest voice to sing higher, when I try to make it louder it just doesn't happen.

Adduction seems like one of the biggest mysteries of singing. You can't see or hear or even feel the vocal cords close! Hope someone can shed some light.

- JayMC

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Adduction is not a mystery. You can hear and feel the cords close.

What you hear is a clear bright non-airy sound. And it's the reason you can tell right now that you're not adducting, how would have the knowledge to even identify you're not adducting if you couldn't hear it? You can. You hear when it's wrong - it just sounds like airy weak crap. So when you hear that you're not adducting, change something until it sounds adducted and kinda full and buzzy. Even if it means practicing on one comfortable pitch so that you have the flexibility to make adjustments to vocalize correctly.

And you can feel adduction too, a little bit - not as much as you can hear it, but you will feel a sense of solidity and stability, maybe a slight squeeze or press inside the larynx, the sensation you are no longer blowing air out but containing it in, and you'll feel the resonance able to buzz and vibrate around your face and upper vocal tract more as a result.

Jay the reason you're losing range is because you're not accurately applying any of the valuable information contained in this forum, your CVT book, your Pillars program, any lessons you have taken, any email exchanges you've had with vocal teachers, etc. I know that you've been handed more than enough information to become a great singer. What's holding you back is you don't trust what you're taught or give it a chance or apply it in practice, you just kinda look at it once, selectively collect bits of information and randomly combine them make up your own exercises as if you know better than these people who have been singing decades longer than you (hint: you don't), and then practice your own little things that don't help.

Is VFE your new little acronym for "vocal fry exercise"? If you've been paying attention, vocal fry is rarely recommended here aside from some people praising Seth Riggs' squeaky door exercise. Which is available on youtube for free. Go ahead and practice that one and follow the directions exactly. A real teacher designed it so it might actually work. And it doesn't work better because it's a better exercise, it works better because you have instructions to follow for HOW to do it. That is one of the most important parts of vocal training. Learning HOW to vocalize correctly. What exercise or why you're doing it doesn't matter nearly as much as HOW to practice the exercise CORRECTLY.

I know I'm repeating myself but you really need to understand this. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS ON HOW TO DO THE EXERCISE CORRECTLY.

And whether it's the Pillars program or the CVT method or skype lessons with some coach on this forum...whatever, the way you start to actually get results is by trusting and following ONE method or mentor and put in the work to get up to their standards. Instead you're asking questions on here you already have the answers for. You say "obviously it is lack of vocal technique" - okay, Jay, so go practice your vocal technique some more and try to practice it better by listening more carefully to directions on how to vocalize correctly!

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Sometimes you can benefit from recording yourself doing your exercises. You hear things on the playback that you don't hear while doing them. Also, if what Owen stated is true, then you need some professional guidance strictly tailored to the problems you are having. There is an old saying: "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results." If what you are doing isn't working, then do something else. At a glance at your problem, I would say your onset is not a good one, and if you don't start the note off right, then it will not end right. I suggest a skype lesson with either Rob or Dan - either can help you figure out whats going on.

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Keith's saying is true but it does NOT mean program-hopping or teacher-hopping upon small issues not sorting out within weeks. It's only time to "hop" to a new teacher or program when months go by and you feel no progress. If you're giving months of dedicated practice and you're improving, stick to whatever you're doing.

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The video Keith posted is a great explanation. Now here's a great video Dante just made with guided exercises on cord closure that will definitely help you. Work on these exercises and follow the directions EXACTLY.

I know what you're thinking..."but I'm talking about falsetto...i want to improve my head voice adduction"....

Look, Dante knows his stuff and has a reason for having his students train adduction in chest voice first. You may not know that reason, you don't have to. Just obey it.

To be a successful student of singing you have to put away your ego and what you selfishly WANT instantly - forget about instant gratification, it will never get you anywhere in vocal training. You have to trust that if you follow this video exactly and practice it regularly you will see progress over time. Bookmark that video and practice to it twice a day, I'm sure you have time for that. Listen to the instructions every time, never skip over them, let them get drilled into your brain. Do that for a week, listening and practicing along. Then send a file of you doing the exercise to Dante via email and he'll probably be kind enough to critique it (turn down the video audio or do it a capella so he can hear you well). Then practice it for another week, opening his email every time to look at the critique until you have it memorized word for word. If you're still having trouble, just keep practicing it for two months, STILL paying attention to the demonstrations and directions and critique. At that point I guarantee you will see results, and if you don't, then well, shucks, you're gonna have to get a coach...

And THEN you can move onto the head voice adduction - there is great content in Pillars for that and you could follow the exact same process with a different video, maybe Rob's lecture on training twang compression.

And even THEN, YOU ARE NOT DONE YET. Then you have to learn how to loosen up the compression a bit, build a mixed voice, darken the timbre a little more, etc. etc. etc. - however the teacher or program's workflow tells you to progress through the various stages of the learning curve.

This is the kind of time and dedication it takes to succeed Jay, with or without a coach, doesn't matter, you have to put in this kind of focus and great attention to detail if you want to improve. It's just a LOT easier with a coach to push you along.

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I don't get this "loyalty" crap. Honestly, use whatever works and later revisit what at first doesn't. This if you're not actively taking one on one lessons. A good teacher will hear what you need to do to get your voice where you need to be, but with exercises it's all just different means to pretty much the same ends.

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I don't get this "loyalty" crap. Honestly, use whatever works and later revisit what at first doesn't. This if you're not actively taking one on one lessons. A good teacher will hear what you need to do to get your voice where you need to be, but with exercises it's all just different means to pretty much the same ends.

I like that you said it. good technique is good technique. There are a million ways to get cord closure, find headvoice ,extend your range,Etc. The thing is do you understand what it feels like? Not thinking you do and wondering why you still cant do the things you want. Not just spouting off a bunch of things you read about some anatomy and then still cant do what you want.

But actually understanding it and being able to give solid examples and help others.

you could use 0ne note going chromatic ,5 note scales, arpeggios, long scales, slides,sirens but if you dont actually really "get it" you will be lost.

So take the time to stay in a comfy range and try and actually feel the sensations,and resonances that are discussed and get a solid foundation or just keep going building your voice with no foundation and having to constantly feel stuck and frustrated..

I always put it out there if anyone that frequents this forum would like some help(no charge) just ask. there are no big secrets but you will have to put down your ego and book knowledge and do what is needed.

I love this forum "sometimes".:)

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Khaserra it's not about loyalty it's about commitment to an approach. It's not like you have to pick one teacher and method and treat it like a spouse. You just have to have a general path to follow - that has been carved by an expert. Or possibly a couple paths but just some sort of focus or direction. Not making up your own disorganized path where you selectively chose random information and try to mix it together into something better - it seems genius in theory but it always fails because it ends up being the inexperienced student trying to manage that mixture. Usually in order to do exercises correctly you have to do them in the way the coach who assigned them recommends or else you end up doing them wrong and wasting your time. The benefit is gone if the "how" of the exercise is tainted by the unqualified opinions of an inexperienced student trying to redesign it in a way that conflicts with the coach's instructions.

Sorry for the big words LOL but I hope that was articulate.

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