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Programming vocal routines

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Khassera
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Since I feel it doesn't really go into the context of the "20h to mastery" thread, I'll start a new one.

I'd like to hear peoples' opinions on vocal training and its routines.

The way I've approached vocal training in the past has been that I have a routine, just a single thing that doesn't really change. It's ranged from 15 to 30 minutes depending on the program, and when I've changed programs the routines have changed. During the workouts I've always focused on getting the tone to sound like the example, and by "progress" I mean getting closer to the sound I'm supposed to make with less tension or effort.

What I mean is I've basically taken a routine, say, a workout of

- Lip rolls to lip trills to brassy hums on different scales

into

- cord closure exercises

to

- different vowels and their modifications on straight a mixed scales

to

- warm down

This took about 15 minutes. I did it every day and noticed a pretty steady progress.

That was one program and its basic routine. I then moved to a more complex program with routines that spanned over more than one "lesson," so there wasn't a specific "daily routine" to work on. This is where I kinda dabbled and did everything at once.

Then I switched into a program that had me doing about 20 minutes of different vocal drills. A vocal workout, if you will. I did that almost every day and noticed a very fast progress since there wasn't really a whole crap ton of exercises to do. Better focus = better results. That's how its worked with all skill based things I've ever done from gymnastics to drawing to singing.

Now due to the allergy season whooping my ass I've switched to a routine that focuses on different areas of the voice, isolating many techniques and polishing them to make the end result better. Even though I have no "daily" routine besides a 10 minute warm up based mostly on humming and lip rolls, I've managed to really build my voice in areas I felt it was lacking.

So tl;rd:

What's your daily routine, or does it change? Do you have a weekly "vocal schedule" like in grade school? Tuesday's math, wednesday's history, friday's arts and crafts! Or do you have a daily routine you follow and work to get better at for the long term, switching whenever you feel you've milked the cycle dry?

I ask, because I want to hear opinions, and I'm building myself a weekly routine just for sh*ts and giggles. :)

EDIT: And yes, I sang even though I did the routines. So this thread is only for workout routines, not another "how much do you sing" -thread.

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Yes I have a regimented routine that I follow every day. And this routine changes over time. I'm estimating 45 minutes broken in two parts, with a break in-between. This routine comes before singing any songs. My routines are parts of programs that I've put into my iPhone so that I can do them wherever and whenever I want - in the car, at home, in any room that is conveinient.

A couple years ago it was various KTVA exercises and CVT exercises. Now it is a bunch of different video clips from Bristow's program and a bunch of Seth Riggs SLS exercises.

My routines always start with the semioccludeds like "ng", lip rolls, etc. The exercises always cover my entire range. And lots of work bridging in the passagio area with various vowels.

I add and subtract different exercises over time. And I change them up a little over time to add degrees of difficulty. Like the Bristow Octave sirens, Instead of a smooth continuous siren up and down, I go up and down faster and pause the low and high notes with vibrato.

I'm looking forward to Dante's vertical fold depth training video because I'm definitely going to incorporate that one.

I find that a consistent routine gives me more consistency when singing songs.

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I do 15 minutes of 5 tone lip trills and octave and a half lip trill arpeggios, then, the TVS foundation building stuff (30 minutes), then the TVS octave arpeggio headvoice workout (5 minutes to 10 minutes depending ), then SLS edge workout (5 minutes), then closure until I am tired - then warm down. All in all about an hour. Usually with no break. It seems like when I take a break, I lose the all the warm up stuff I did. Sometimes, I do this twice a day. Other times, I do it every other day. I seem to advance faster if I do things every other day, but when I skip a day, I feel guitly lol.

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it used to do a seriously regimented specific set of exercises, done almost every day.

from all different people's programs..but i would only do that one program.

now i do what i consider my "basics".....then i move on to what i want to improve.

but i always knock off what i consider the basics.

the day after a hard workout, if i feel like i overdid things, i'll take off a day......best for me.

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I do the workouts Phil gives me. Which one i do depends on a combination of 1. What he wants me to train most right now 2. What I need to sing today 3. How the workouts affect the other workouts if I'm doing two a day (order is important)

Mostly the same thing every day, but at times Phil has recommended I alternate with days of just head voice only training. I have to start doing that more, I tend not to because then I have to restrain myself from using full voice at all

So no I don't believe in weekly regimens. Destroys consistency as your voice will be different every day. Never made sense to me. So mostly a daily regimen here. Sometimes alternating in one different workout (e.g. pure head voice) on some days but not a different thing every day for a week. This isn't like gym where you have chest day leg day etc. Your voice has to be ready to go every day if you're doing any actual recording or performing, so its just necessary to keep daily consistency most of the time.

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So no I don't believe in weekly regimens. Destroys consistency as your voice will be different every day. Never made sense to me. So mostly a daily regimen here. Sometimes alternating in one different workout (e.g. pure head voice) on some days but not a different thing every day for a week. This isn't like gym where you have chest day leg day etc. Your voice has to be ready to go every day if you're doing any actual recording or performing, so its just necessary to keep daily consistency most of the time.

It would make sense, I guess. It's a muscle/coordination based skill, and requires a crap ton of finesse. If you change it up too often you might cover "all the bases" but you're probably going to have a slower progress. That's what I've found happens with me, at least.

So for me, I do a solid warm up of about 10-15 mins every morning with no exception. If I'm sick I do breathing exercises. After that I pick an area of the voice I wanna work on specifically (lately it's been head-dominant low mix) and run 4-6 exercises for that. To finish I run through a "technique set" of maybe 4-6 exercises with one scale each, so that takes about 20 mins at most. This last set of exercises kinda knits it all together and lets me track my progress very easily. Then I'm done. I just sing all throughout the day onto backing tracks.

This is me 5 days a week. Once a week I actually sit down and take a longer session, do a lot of lighter work, and I might sing more with an actual studio setup and monitoring, but the hour of "solid vocal work" (not counting in the singing onto backing tracks) is what I usually spend with a focus.

... I do lip bubbles, humming, lots of weird noises all throughout the day, though. Mainly because

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I don't have a daily drill or routine. The only thing I have to do is pledge allegiance to Satan to keeo the "folds of destiny."

\m/

Really, I am kind of a cross-trainer. I do different things each and every day and my voice does not fall into a routine. For me, I think, flexibility is the ultimate.

Or, I have some religious objection to a rigid structure of vocal practice. Which may explain a lot. :lol:

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