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What is my voice type?

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I started singing a few months ago and haven't had any coaching or anything, just watched some youtube videos on technique and stuff. It seems voice type classification has more to do with weight and timbre than range. I've been told I was a bunch of different voice types by different people and I want more of a broader, unbiased opinion. I can't decide between a tenor, low tenor or baritenor (maybe even high baritone?). I haven't really found a style of singing to stick to either. I have recordings to make it easier.

Lowest recorded note: C2 (sounds a bit fryish in the mix but I've been able to sustain a fairly bassy sounding resonance around the same pitch)

At about 2:28

Highest recorded note: C5

at 4:25

I have a few other songs on there with highs lingering in the upper 4th octave and lows around E2 - C3. I've gone lower and higher not in recording but up above D5 and E5 it begins to start sounding very heady and I haven't found a song that I can sing comfortably up there.

My comfort range is F2 to F#4 any time of day including after warm ups.

Any suggestions will help.

Thanks.

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Your voice type is "goosenfrabe." (I get that word from the movie, "Anger Management.") Outside of opera, voice types are kind of useless.

"I walk the Line." That was not a C2. I think you scraped the bottom of your voice and croaked a G2. By some definitions, I am a high tenor and I have made a few notes lower than you, though really low in volume.

"Hey You" - I am not sure that was a true C5 and it was more of a skip in the voice.

However, listening to the weight of your voice, and I am not an expert and typing your voice is a hazardous guess, you are some kind of tenor, probably lyric. Too me, not enough weight to be helden and not enough solidity in the high end to be high tenor or leggiero. And it really won't matter unless you are studying opera.

But, from my estimation of what I admire in baritone voices, you are not baritone.

Also, about your high notes, you are pushing too hard. slow down the air speed. Think of a high note being low in the throat. It's counterintuitive but it will stabilize the larynx.

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The counter-question is how does it matter to you? What will you use your classification for? If I told you you were a tenor with a low extension how would that change anything?

Your recordings have a full three octave in range and for most microphone singing styles that's plenty. Not all notes are equally strong, but training can even that out. I would forget all about range and type and just work on quality - how can you make your voice sound its best? When you have a good G3 you can start working on making the rest of the voice fit that in terms of power and tone.

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Your C5 was flipping between falsetto and head voice,( most likely due to not modifying the vowel). Thats most likely what Ron meant. Sounds like the very top of your range and not quite usable. Classification does not matter in any situation, unless you are singing opera. A person can practice and change their classification, if they want. A lower tenor is what I would say. But, understand that if you have NOT trained and are going to start training, that could change.

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