Jump to content

How Much Energy To Give My Speaking Voice

Rate this topic


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone, my speaking voice is kind of low energy, quiet, and moderately monotone - sometimes nasally. Ofcourse, many of us don't just talk and bust out into singing like a Glee episode that is a skill some of us may wish to hone. Been having some good luck with the "pencil" method trying to read something and then removing the pencil having my voice "re-placed" or whatever making it significantly EASIER to produce.

Do you guys keep your speaking voices in check as part of a warm-up or a specific routine? Can someone share their experience with adjusting speaking voice to be more energetic, loud, or clear. Is there ANY benefit to this?

Although to advance the question even further, would you all not agree that good speaking has tons of inflections, change in loudness, even dynamic change of tone color and larynx position?

How do I manage this in an interesting way in order to ensure I can talk for very long without "wearing out" or struggling to speak louder for long periods and equally importantly transition into SINGING easier. This also seems like a support issue because it feels like speaking/singing have very different support values.

What exercises vocally are good and does reading materials out-loud help the process? Does anyone here use tongue twisters :lol:

- JayMC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay,

Right now if you start to remove nasalance from your spoken voice, it will start to round and become "noble", then you will mess up a good reference that, for now is working. And you will lose energy, that for now, is within what would be expected.

Articulate clearly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lool I'm having trouble following.

I will say this, I recently realised that my French speaking voice grinds down my voice quite harshly and that the English one is much healthier.

I think more twang-like elements are used in English, so I have been trying to integrate those elements into my French speaking voice, it has made my accent stronger but my voice seems to be getting healthier.

France is known for having alot of smokers (the french governement had a deal with a tobacco company and would give cigarettes to people during their obligatary military service), but even with that taken into account it is astonishing the amount of people that have really trashed their speaking voices and I don't think that it's just down to lifestyle.

It seems to me that many Americans have brighter voices than the British, you tend to hear them in a crowd when they visit Europe, they might have healthier habits...

That's my two cen........

Tuppence ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello everyone, my speaking voice is kind of low energy, quiet, and moderately monotone - sometimes nasally. Ofcourse, many of us don't just talk and bust out into singing like a Glee episode that is a skill some of us may wish to hone. Been having some good luck with the "pencil" method trying to read something and then removing the pencil having my voice "re-placed" or whatever making it significantly EASIER to produce.

Do you guys keep your speaking voices in check as part of a warm-up or a specific routine? Can someone share their experience with adjusting speaking voice to be more energetic, loud, or clear. Is there ANY benefit to this?

Although to advance the question even further, would you all not agree that good speaking has tons of inflections, change in loudness, even dynamic change of tone color and larynx position?

How do I manage this in an interesting way in order to ensure I can talk for very long without "wearing out" or struggling to speak louder for long periods and equally importantly transition into SINGING easier. This also seems like a support issue because it feels like speaking/singing have very different support values.

What exercises vocally are good and does reading materials out-loud help the process? Does anyone here use tongue twisters :lol:

- JayMC

By "pencil method" are you referring to the tone or resonance being above the pencil? That will keep you from speaking too low and give your voice better carrying power. Less of a chance to speak with too much air also.

You should use the same support and resonance ideas on speaking as you do in singing. Sometimes I sing-speak when I know I need to continue a conversation even though my voice is getting too dry and tired.

Some people like "Mel Tillis" or "James Earl Jones" Sing-Speak to keep control over studdering problems.

To sum up..... If you apply the techniques for singing to your speaking then yes your speaking voice will improve.

And yes speaking should be full of dynamics and inflections and energy. The lack of those things is why men have trouble with their singing in the first place. Low energy = low support = lack of cord closure = monotone, non energetic, boring, harmful speach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

jay,

listen to the speaking voices of singer's that sing on the hard side. there are videos of them all over yt. you'll find that the vast majority of them speak with some kind of inflection and they don't speak loudly at all. some even have a melodic tone to their speaking voice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I found the best solution on my own... although the pros have no need for this some of you may find this mildly entertaining and others will find it insanely useful :)

The magic happens for me at 4:55 and 7:30 and it truly highlights the benefit of an in-person vocal coach and the beauty of technique being applied correctly. In my opinion the clip is not staged but your opinions may differ, the whole clip is worth watching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^reminds me of spray-on hair by Ron Popeil. And if he gets them to go up or down one or two notes, that is not changing the voice to a different register or type. Just someone SJR booked because Cher or some other real celebrity was too busy,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found the best solution on my own... although the pros have no need for this some of you may find this mildly entertaining and others will find it insanely useful :)

The magic happens for me at 4:55 and 7:30 and it truly highlights the benefit of an in-person vocal coach and the beauty of technique being applied correctly. In my opinion the clip is not staged but your opinions may differ, the whole clip is worth watching.

Good call on the Dr. Cooper. We have mentioned before about the "Um, Hum" and "Uh, Oh" as being a good way to find the proper placement of the speaking voice.

I watched a few of the Videos on Dr. Coopers Youtube channel. He seems to repeat the same things on them. Mainly resonate in the mask and out of the throat, of course also use proper breathing. Use the hum to find that resonance and buzz.

If you will notice on Roberts videos he uses the hum on a lot of his exercises.

When I am speaking to other people I can tell that I am making all of the mistakes that Dr. Cooper points out and by the end of a few sentences my voice is dry and tired. So thank you for reminding me of this. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...