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michael jackson and belting

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blaeez
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Hey there. I have a question about the vocal techniques that Michael Jackson is using his belting voice. I know it's pretty specific question but I can't seem to find anything on the internet commenting on it. In the song " Another Part of Me", especially during the chorus, his voice kind of rasps giving it the effect that he is shouting. In this live video, it is evident on the phrase " We're sounding out a major love" and also through most of the song.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNESMH-5e2U

Is he belting at all or just giving certain more words more power? Is he able to do this because was able to hit such high notes? Meaning that he gave it a little more power when hitting those and thus was able to produce a bit of rasp? Does this Have to do with his overall tone of singing/speaking voice? How do I produce a bit of rasp in an otherwise mostly smooth sounding tone tenor voice in a healthy way? I must find a way to sing in this style. I look forward to hearing your feedback.

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I don't know if there's a "healthy" way to produce the kind of rasp that he performs in this video. Bear in mind that if this concert was done on tour, you don't really know the context surrounding it. Maybe he wasn't in the best vocal shape at the time of the recording. Maybe this was towards the end of the concert when he was more vocally fatigued. He drops out a lot when he sings "You're just another part of me" and lets the background singers fill in. To me, it sounds like there is a grittiness that is not typical of his sound. I haven't taken the time to look at other live samples, but if you haven't done so already, it would be worth your time to look at other samples and compare.

In my mind, I wouldn't want to use this as a model, especially if I had a "mostly smooth sounding tone tenor voice." But that just depends on your goal and the genre of music that you like to/want to perform.

To answer the other part of your question, yes, it does seem like he's emphasizing certain words that lend themselves to raspiness. But IMHO, I don't think he's thinking about tone quality and purposefully choosing that sound. I think the tone is a byproduct of his musicianship, ability to perform, ability to get a reaction out of the audience, ability to entertain. I think that in those particular moments, his concern about tone takes a back seat to his concern about effect. And again, this live concert was most likely balanced with songs that are more "lyric" and pretty sounding. That's why he was such a great performer. Because he had the ability to take his audience on a musical journey that was complete and not simply one style.

If you are going to attempt this style, I think that it will be at the expense of some vocal health. But if you balance it out with better technique in other songs in your set, then it may be worth the expense. It just depends on your ultimate goal. If you want to preserve the clarity of your voice forever, then I wouldn't attempt to work it into your repertoire of vocal techniques. If you ultimately want to achieve a raspier sound as a kind of "signature," then by all means, go for it.

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The days when Michael belted his songs live... Amazing. I can't help with the technique question but guys check out the whole Wembley concert in 88 if you already haven't, not only is the concert itself amazing but you get to see and hear how Michael structured his set, songs etc, how he took breaks during the 1,5 hour concert (long instrumental parts etc), what songs he belted and where and so on. And what an energy he put into the show. Anyone who does something like this on tour time after time sure deserves to be called an athlete :)

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The days when Michael belted his songs live... Amazing. I can't help with the technique question but guys check out the whole Wembley concert in 88 if you already haven't, not only is the concert itself amazing but you get to see and hear how Michael structured his set, songs etc, how he took breaks during the 1,5 hour concert (long instrumental parts etc), what songs he belted and where and so on. And what an energy he put into the show. Anyone who does something like this on tour time after time sure deserves to be called an athlete :)

Thanks for the suggestion, I'm really digging it.

Another thing I noticed is quite a genius win-win move for him and his audience: putting in dramatic pauses to give himself a break but also make it part of the show.

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I don't know if there's a "healthy" way to produce the kind of rasp that he performs in this video.

If you are going to attempt this style, I think that it will be at the expense of some vocal health.

from what ive read there are safer ways to produce rasp, though its still not know whether these ways are truly completely healthy over time, but its much healthier in comparison to other methods.

interested to hear other comments on this.

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there is definitely a way to produce this kind of singing without injury. one thing you have to remember when you rasp out like that you have to go back and de-stress the folds...yes, you stressed them up a bit...but you go back and do some descending falsetto slides, lip bubbles, ng sirens, and light things to bring them some comfort and relaxation.....drink your water (every day) no yelling or loud talking (even worse).

airiness (friction) is your worst enemy......correct rasp is not airy and it's not throaty..

don't fear rasp! if you're going to do it, (and do it right) you have to commit to it...the tentative, guarded approach can do you more harm.

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"healthier" is the key word. You can do rasp and distortion "healthier" but, all other variables equal, a clean tone is always healthier than distorted. Distortion is never going to earn the title of "healthiest" phonation ever. However, within the practice of vocal distortion, there is a full spectrum from, damaging the voice immediately, to could be damaging only if done extensively for hours without rest, and everything in between.

If you notice how Michael Jackson looks like he's working so hard live is because he is doing some of the hardest things a singer could:

-articulating consonants aggressively

-distortion more often than not

-sophisticated, athletically intense dancing at the same time

and even more

I think it's pretty clear that MJ has found a healthiER way to distort otherwise his voice would be gone after the second song. However he knows that singing clean is healthiest and if you listen to his sessions with Seth Riggs he's training as clean as he can for that reason.

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One awesome example of a guy who has made his career based on killer distortion and still singing like Thor is Jorn Lande. I don't know how old is he, maybe in his forties, and his voice is better than ever.

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I think one of the most important things about maintaining health is having options, if you depend on just one coordination and for some reason, health related or not, you are not getting it to work well, you absolutely can not find yourself forced to use it in order to deliver the performance.

When it comes to distortion its specially true, if you are going to sing a repertoire and when you remove distortion it all sounds poor (I revised the word in respect for Adolph :P), you are placing yourself in a situation where either you go agressive, or you will perform poor (once more hehehe). The day being agressive does not feel that good... guess what will happen.

All in all its a really wise idea to manage the ammount of agressiveness you use, both for the sake of health as well as improving the difference it makes. If you keep at 100% of intensity 100% of the time, it gets old very fast.

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I think one of the most important things about maintaining health is having options, if you depend on just one coordination and for some reason, health related or not, you are not getting it to work well, you absolutely can not find yourself forced to use it in order to deliver the performance.

When it comes to distortion its specially true, if you are going to sing a repertoire and when you remove distortion it all sounds poor (I revised the word in respect for Adolph :P), you are placing yourself in a situation where either you go agressive, or you will perform poor (once more hehehe). The day being agressive does not feel that good... guess what will happen.

All in all its a really wise idea to manage the ammount of agressiveness you use, both for the sake of health as well as improving the difference it makes. If you keep at 100% of intensity 100% of the time, it gets old very fast.

Ha Ha.... It's really not about ME, Felipe. I'm not exactly what one may call a "Saint". But during the past few years, I received a number of complaints from many of the members that were offended by inappropriate language. Additionally, unkike other forums, we strive to maintain the integrity of this forum. Anyway, as I read your post, I doubt the word you preferred to use would have been offensive ! Besides, not once have I seen you violate the forum rules !!!

But to get back to the thread my friend, I agree with Phil..... "Fantastic post" :D

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Guys check out me singing "Bad" https://app.box.com/s/l1t9qpsdme18mkvdgmgg

I also posted this on my "Girls girls girls" thread on Review my singing -part. I think I'm getting a handle on some of this Jackson stuff, and my voice is a bit stronger than it has been before.

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Nice, Opaa. Your voice is centered in a place that makes that kind of singing more comfortable. The high "Bad"s sound like you are not bridging yet, so they sound shouty, in contrast to Michaels "bad"s that sound more controled. They are aggressive, but because of the intention and distortion. To me it sounds more like a heavy curbing with distortion, while you are singing the vowel a lot more open and it sounds more shouty.

Nothing wrong with that, I am just comparing qualities :) Hope it helps you.

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Sounds cool Opaa! Awesome MJ impression there hahaha.

This is kinda off topic but weren't you featured on KTVA video tutorial on youtube before? (How to Sing like Adam Lambert, Myles Kennedy) you sound really familiar. (I mean that in a completely non-creepy way lol :lol: ) I'm bringing it up because I just want to point out something. It sounded like there was a bit of vocal tract shifting around the "you know it" part. Try to sing that phrase with the vowels more contiguous closer to this"Yah Knah (quick w) eht. I'm just telling you this so you can keep a more relaxed/open throat.

Try to sing the phrase "Wait till I get through" like "Weht tell Ah geht thr- (quick)oh (quick) oo vowel)

:cool:If you're not the guy in the video, my bad, just completely ignore me lol.

Hope that helps/makes sense. :)

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Thanks for the tips again guys, I will try them out! Wabba yes it's me... :)

I don't completely want to hijack this thread so I'll continue posting my practices on Critique part of forum. Just did some raspy screams gonna post them, please check them out too.

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