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Is this Bridging, or Belting?

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Mr.stevenbradley
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The question is obvious, but I have another question!

The question concerns mainly the chorus and outro. "I'm not alright...I'm broken inside, broken inside. etc"

Is this sound POSSIBLE with healthy bridging? Or is the quality, timbre, and intensity only achievable through proper belting?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7cQkg1ZAZs

This is Matt Hammit from Sanctus Real. Nice guy, I got to meet him last summer.

Thanks for all your input!!

(Here's another version of the song. It may be easier to identify what he's doing.

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LISTENING TO THAT PASSAGE I'D SAY HE BRIDGED TO HEAD VOICE WITH RASP. BELTING IS BOTH A NATURAL ABILITY AND A VOCAL SKILL THAT USUALLY REQUIRES POWER AND SUSTENENCE. BELTING IS VERY OBVIOUS IN A SONG LIKE "HEAD GAMES" (FOREIGNER), "WHERE WOULD YOU BE" MARTINA MCBRIDE, AND A LOT OF CELENE DION SONGS. JUST WANT TO CAUTION YOU THAT IMPROPER BELTING CAN BE HARMFUL IF NOT USED PROPERLY. NOT EVERYONE IS BORN TO BELT. BOB

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Belting and bridging are two entirely different things and from the outset, makes no sense... , "some people are not born to belt"... really? Allow me to jump in here:

1). Ok, anyone can learn to belt, so thats not correct.

2). Belt is a vocal mode that is characterized by a speech=like or yell-like sound that any number of vocal styles. Or a loud sound with a bright, some what ringy quality that conveys the excitement of high emotional tension. I encourage you to read Lisa Popeil's blog on belting on the main site. http://www.themodernvocalist.com/profiles/blogs/how-to-belt-some-howto-and

Theater and Rockers tend to do a LOT of belting. (Belting and Twang are the most common vocal modes I work with at TVS given my large rocker clientele). At TVS, we further define belting as a vocal mode that resides only in the chest voice. Once a singer is bridged into the head voice, you certainly can "convey ... excitment of high emotional tension" in the head voice with thyroid tilts, and twangy configurations to amplify 2-4khz frequencies and gain some "cut"... HOWEVER, that configuration and its physiology is not consistent with belting vocal modes. Keeping it simple, belting at TVS is a high chest voice note with high energy and attack. So back to your question Steven...

If you sing a well balanced, well placed upper chest voice note in your chest voice, you are belting. Set your resonant track and then release on a high chest voice note... thats more or less a belt. But once you are bridged into your head voice, your modes change from belt configurations to twang/tilting configurations... consistent with what your learning at TVS.

Bridging is just the ability and art of being able to create a seamless, uninterrupted vocal tone from chest to head,,, from head to chest with no constriction or nasty extrinsic muscle engagement. So you see Steven, trying to compare belting to bridging makes no sense... its like trying to compare... using my painter analogy.... the color of blue with how to properly move your wrist when executing a nice brush stroke... it makes no sense... its the difference between form and function. Belting is function... bridging is form and its a form that has nothing to do with the function of belting.

When is your next session? You did a great job last time... lets keep up the progress.

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Robert, thank you very much for clarifying that. :)

I'm pretty sure I understand what you mean. I think my understanding of Belting could of been wrong from the beginning. I've always thought that Belting meant pulling your chest voice up where it is NOT supposed to go. Like you could somehow stretch your chest voice up above High 'C' while escaping the bridging process, in order to get a big sound. It would be the thing that untrained singers would gravitate towards, like Bono for example. I think I remember you telling me he was/is a belter. Like on the song "New Year's Day", hitting a male high 'C' on the line "Say it's, TRUE, it's true." Which just sounds totally awesome.

So belt is just a 'vocal mode', so to speak? So for example, hitting a E5 is physiologically impossible WITHOUT the bridging, adduction, etc, going on?

Belting is just the characteristic of it?

Can't wait to get back into the studio... I'll keep you posted.

-Steven-

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i think he is on the beltier side of the fence (would be interesting to hear if he could sing the same pitch at a lower volume and without the rock grit added) though i think its a good version of a belt.

it is possible to sing in a very similar way I.E. timbre (as in sounds like chest voice) and intensity with bridging but the quality would sound different. with bridging it would have less of a yelling, shouting like quality and sound a bit more like his lower tones but just up higher. not to say that one is neccersarily better than the other its just down to what quality you personally want to acchieve.

signs of a belt like quality are generally

more shouty, yelling type quality

spread/wide vowels

can only be produced with a loud volume

high larynx

LOTS of support

its really a matter of style choice. for instance he doest have to sing the chorus that way. if he sang it with a strong mixed voice it would still rock but just have a slightly different quality. either way would rock.

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Sweet guys! This is so cool that I can ask a question and get so many answers from all across the board. :)

I've recently discovered how to get fuller tones in the passagio area, and suddenly singing a song like this is completely possible!! Unlike before, where it would just sound squeezed and weird.

At first I suspected I'd stumbled on to the 'belt' mode, or something. But the crazy thing is that it takes normal (and sometimes below normal) air pressure to achieve the sounds. And on a one to ten scale, using a '1' or '2' in air pressure can achieve a powerful raspy/gritty sound. So strange, but fantastic. It's not even NEAR the 'lots of support' that Centerofuniverse describes.

And to Robert Lunte, I can't wait to come back into the studio and show you whats happened since last saturday. :)

TVS really works man, this is so sweet.

-Thanks-

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At first I suspected I'd stumbled on to the 'belt' mode, or something. But the crazy thing is that it takes normal (and sometimes below normal) air pressure to achieve the sounds. And on a one to ten scale, using a '1' or '2' in air pressure can achieve a powerful raspy/gritty sound. So strange, but fantastic. It's not even NEAR the 'lots of support' that Centerofuniverse describes.

Mr.stevenbradley: Congrats on your breakthrough. What did you think 'support' was? ;) Its about supplying just the right amount of breath energy, and (apparently) you formerly were using a bit too much. Now, you know what your 'zone' is for this, you will make very rapid progress.

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When I thought of the term "tons of support" I imagined sub-glottal pressure at near explosion point, releasing a sound that was only available in one flavor: LOUD! Something that wouldn't let anyone last too long vocally... :)

I sat down with the song "Feels like the first time" by Foreigner and was able to manage the Bb4 in the chorus very well. It was an amazing, surprising feeling.

After reading Robert's explanation about belting, something really clicked. It got me thinking, How much are people (like me) limited by our understanding of the voice and what goes on in there? It's another testament that right believing leads to right doing/living.

When I believed that I had to REACH for higher notes, then that's exactly what my body did: It clenched up, geared up and reached for the sky, only to fail miserably! :)

Now with simply understanding more truths about the voice, and training with that knowledge in mind, it has led to much progress.

If I KNOW that everything in my larynx relatively stays put, then I (with training) have the potential to hit Alessandro Del Vecchio type notes while I'm sitting down relaxing. On the other hand, if I'm convinced I can't do it, then I will prove myself right; and won't bother proving myself wrong. ;)

Ale, if you happen to read this, I love the newer video on your MySpace of you sitting at the keys... :) Amazing!!

-Steven-

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yes Mr.stevenbradley dont confuse too much pressure in the throat with support. support can be a wide topic but as Steven said in a sentence its about using the breathing mechanics to control the correct amount of air needed for any particular tone or volume.

singing a note with a loud volume whether it be one with a mixed/bridged quality or one with a belt quality will require more support. however i believe that belt type sounds often require more effort or physical conditioning than mixed or bridged ones (this is usually evidental by watching someone produce a belt type sound and the fact that a belt can only be produced loud )

by the way, i would say that Lou Gramm uses much more of a mixed or bridge type sound than a belted one though i also think he puts more "guts" into it than he needs to. for instance in the vid below when he sings the line "ive been waiting" it sounds quite squeezed and and you can see that its requiring more phyical effort too produce.

it is entirely possible to sing that line in a purely mixed or bridged way that requires no effort at all.

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Yeah, his young "that was yesterday" chokes me up these days in light of his illness. Even in those new videos though, he doesnt sound as much strained as wobbly and uncontrolled to me.

This is pretty good though, he's very tensed up though, even though he's got some sort of witches cackle thing going to relieve him (I think):

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Belting is almost a curse word for me :) This is because I have found it to be rarely interpreted correctly to mean strength of resonance. Instead, most people think belting is regurgitating vocal sound at somebody.

If done correctly, there will be no vocal strain experienced. Imho, never sing louder than your instrument can resonate. Centre's comment about needing more physical conditioning to make the sound known as "belting" I think is too the point. This conditioning can of course increase... but only comes from practice... using correct technique, not pushing sound.

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those notes would be very difficult if you were trying to achieve them in a pure chest voice coordination however if you start to use bridged/mixed coordinations they are not so hard. lou gramm does it with a bridged/mixed coordination but as we could see from the live vid he might have a tendency to put too much effort into the production.

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